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I wanted to quickly take an old 1300cc Giulia TI engine apart, the block was meant to be used as the basis for my Giulietta Sprint project. I was always wondering why people were discussing the difficulties and methods to remove a cylinder head, it always appeared easy to me. Not this time. The head was stuck badly.

I skipped the rope method, no way it would work here, and went straight to lots of oil, WD40 and then took out the Alfa head removal tool A.2.0451. With lots of effort over a few days I managed to lift the head by maybe 5mm, going backwards and forwards multiple times.

Finally, shortly befor giving up completely and about to dump the whole unit I employed the Prety Big Hammer method. And this worked, with many really big blows. Incredible how hard this was and also I was surprised how many hits the head took before it started cracking. The block is saved at least.


PBH.jpg
 

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I wonder why you did not try the 'rope method'. IME, the rope stuffed into two cylinders (1 & 4) plus the leverage you can then apply via the crankshaft is significant. However the fact the Alfa tool only got you 5 mm does seem to make the rope method less likely to work.

And, BTW, I guess I am obligated to inform you that WD40 doesn't work well for this purpose. A proper penetrating oil (PB Blaster, Kroil or a 50/50 mix of acetone and ATF) is more likely to do something useful. Even then, it often takes a few days or a week of soaking to be effective.
 

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I used penetrating oil as well, see above, lots of it over several days. No way the rope would have done the trick. You cannot imagine how much force was required to get this head off.
 

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I have never had penetrating oil of any kind help. Two Alfa tools is the best method I've found. The corrosion in the head can form into the threads of the stud, acting like a lock. If you can move it 5mm, could you stand to pound it back down, move it up again, sort of like filing the corrosion off? I realize once you make any progress you don't want to give it up.

Sometimes you have to go a mm at a time. I had a 2000 Berlina from Arizona, hard water and no antifreeze, took me a week with two tools. I didn't break either one though I have on other engines. Good luck.

Andrew
 

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one old trick I learned years ago is to use the PB blaster liberally, and every day or so go out and hit the top of the studs with an air hammer for a couple of seconds (with a dull or better yet rounded off tool in the hammer). This transmits both low and high freq vibrations down the study length and tends to break up corrosion. Its worked well for me over the years,
 

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Sometimes they never come off. 65Sprint related his weeks long saga where he was able to separate them an inch or so but no more. He finally decided to sacrifice the block and save the head and he cut through the studs one at a time with a cutoff wheel. Most of the pieces then came out of the head fairly easily but he had to pound a couple of them out with a lump hammer.
 

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Ed provides a pretty accurate account of that attempted head removal saga. Ed, Gordon Raymond, and others provided some great ides and guidance but I still lost the battle. A machine shop drilled out the last stud remaining in the head. I could not move it with a three pound hammer.
 

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Yep. I have a 1750 sitting in the rain next to my garage, never did get the head off. Broke two factory tools on it, used a sledge and block to use the piston/rod combo as a driver from below. Nope!
Andrew
 
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