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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

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"I fell into a burnin' ring of fire"

I don't always make the best decisions in life, but I'm confident in saying that I would never apply flame decals around a car like that. :frown2:
 

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Hope my LS never ends up like that! Maybe I could sell him my spare upper support?
 

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Bodywise, it doesn't look to be in bad condition. What the drivetrain is like, who knows.

BTW, did notice the Jeepster in the picture background. Both my father and Barb's father had one of those. Actually, my father had one of the original design, one of the later early 50's design, and then one of the much later 70's? design with the automatic w/Hurst shifter and V engine.

All of them were absolutely terrible cars, total death traps.

I remember the first time we took that last one out into the wilds of Eastern Oregon, and a rear leaf spring hanger broke away from the frame rail, while just on paved roads. It had been very poorly welded, with almost no bead, and had just broken off. Local farmer welded it back up again for $20.

Had to laugh in a sad way, because my father had always said that my Alfas would fall apart within a few thousand miles, being Eyetalian junk, of course. I didn't rub it in, esp when the Sprint GT had 260k miles on it when I sold it.

Alas, he never did have a decent car as I was growing up. The 67 Olds 442 was junky, lots of stuff not working right, terrible handling, the Buick was a huge boat with more chrome on the inside than out, the Caddie kept losing seals in the tranny and the rear axle. the only cars he really liked were the Mazda 5 door 626 and the Merkur. He really liked that Merkur, as even with the automatic (20 less hp?), it ran very well, was solid, had lots of goodies, and handled pretty well. Plus, he could drive it downtown, being not that big a car.

As for myself, I stuck with Alfas, and haven't looked back in all these years.
 

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If anyone is seriously interested in the car, a dedicated Alfa repair shop is 10 minutes away. I'm sure they would either know the car or check it out for a few bucks.

Alfa Auto Clinic
526 Merrick Rd,
Baldwin, NY 11510
Near the intersection of Merrick Rd and Loft Ave
(516) 623-0199
 

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Rule #1....Don't buy a Northeastern Car, or one subjected to salt anywhere.
Hmmm, I live in NY. I've never bought table salt, just scrap it up off the roads at the end of the season and put it in a shaker. Kids don't know. Wife makes believe she doesn't know. Anyway, I'm on my 4th 164 and I've never, ever had an issue with rust or corrosion on mechanicals, chassis, or body. Lucky?
 

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I've lived Toronto and New Brunswick for 30 years and worked on cars driven in salt. Since then, I've lived in Wyoming, Florida and WA state and worked on cars I've owned in those areas. Since living in WA, I've even owned a 164 that spent some of it's life in Wisconsin (salt). More modern cars (164) coming from salty areas may look ok from the outside, but my experience is working on them is hell compared to non salty cars. Everything you do on a salty car is a struggle. Bolts are rusted and either have to be soaked on penetrating oil for days, or they break. Things are difficult to get apart, etc, etc. Cars from non salty areas are so much easier to work on. Salty area 164 owners on the BB have reported rust around the gas fill door, front of the rear wheel well arches, etc. One guy was looking for a rear cross member member due to rust. Alfisto Steve bought one of those cars. Have you seen the rehab pics? Doubt if he'll do that again:)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yep my BB2 the 164S was a challenge and lucky for me reassembly was not reverse of disassembly.

I have owned two other northern 164s. One from PA still running in town here and another one from MA Rexcars daughter now has. Neither one of those two was as bad underneather as BB2 was.
 

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One area of rust on S's I've discovered, because I had bought a used set of S struts from back east, was the bottom of the front struts where the sheet metal that holds the bolts going to the hub wraps around the shock tube. Rust can occur between that wrapped around sheet metal and the tube, causing a swelling and eventually a hole to open up in the sheet metal.

I think that if it is not too bad, it will be structurally ok, but I could see it getting much worse and causing the strut to fail at the bottom.

The struts I bought were supposed to have only about 60k miles on them, but both front ones have some rust in that location, one being much worse than the other, complete with a little rust at the top of the shaft, the other having none. I think the guy slipped me one off a much higher mileage car.
 

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The beers taste really good after 6 hour rear lower strut bolt removal. So we got that to look forward to!

My Alfa was in rough shape. Tough service life. My mustang could be a CA car. Garaged and never driven in salt for 16 years or so that we've had it. My 02 GTI was really clean underneath after 9 years and 120k of daily driving. Both of my folks 99 Fords are in good shape. The Crown Vic a bit better than the Explorer. My in laws 09 Golf is in worse shape than all the others mentioned. All depends on how they were used and maintained.

There comes a point where they're gonna rust to death, or they go into semi retirement like my 164 and you can string them along for a while. For my next one, I would branch out a bit and check friendlier environments.
 

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what"s rust? ciao jc
 

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Discussion Starter #14
what"s rust? ciao jc
I understand it comes in a can labeled PB-Blaster or at least that PB liquid is same color.
 

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Back in College days in Eastern Canada, I patched rusted holes in the floor and trunk with roofing cement and burlap bag. Not much structural support, but it kept the water out and was cheap. We had a 1959 Mercedes 220S. One day when Sharon was opening the passenger door, it sagged down 4 inches. The door post has completely rusted away from the body. I had to fabricate a bracket and weld it to the frame to bolt the lower door hinge to. Ahhhh, those were the days:)
 

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Yeah, sounds like a real ton of fun, lol.
 

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Richard2

I grew up in Wyoming and it is actually a good place for cars. They don't salt the roads but use sand instead. All the cars have pitted windshields and paint, but tend to be free of tinworm due to the dry climate. Same holds true for Colorado.
 

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Wyoming also has freeways with 2-3 inch deep potholes in the paving. Hit one of those at 80 mph out in the middle of nowhere, and bent a nice new wheel. Thought it was going to take the suspension off. The semis which use those cross state freeways just tear the roads up, and the state doesn't fix them. Never going back, ever.
 

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But...but.. he underlined SPORT! that makes it ok, right? hmm, that support bracket looks awfully familiar.. wonder if any stop signs disappeared the night before that repair was affected. It's been there repeatedly and the only thing that has changed is the picture quality continues to decline as you see everything BUT the car's condition. They sand the roads here in Potato-rim as well. Sadly they use lava rock which doesn't grind consistently meaning not only do you wind up getting free media blasting over the winter, but randomly you also get a broken windshield with a nice sized lava rock is hurled at your windshield by a lumbering pickup. Given Gargantua has had just about everything else in the front end replaced, I should consider myself fortunate she wont be back on the road until they've had a chance to remove the detritus of winter.
 

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We lived in Cheyenne for 7 years and loved it. At one point we had 2 Toyoto Landcruiser diesels and bought a book called 8,000 Miles of Wyoming Dirt. It detailed some of the best back roads in the state. I bought my 1st Alfa while living there, hunted and fished, and yes, had the windshield sand blasted:), even experienced cold winters and snow with no salt on the roads. It's a great state. We had a lot of fun.
 
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