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Discussion Starter #1
Even if that Stepnose shell continues to look as solid as it appears there is a long and expensive road ahead before she would ever turn a wheel under her own power should I pursue it.

The shell comes with a donor GTV, but is it a '68 I believe and who knows how mess about it has been.

I know the engines and brakes changed over the years, what other key differences should I be aware of? Stepnose trim is going to be difficult and/or expensive to track down I suppose...

Thanks!
 

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I know the engines and brakes changed over the years, what other key differences should I be aware of? Stepnose trim is going to be difficult and/or expensive to track down I suppose...
It would take pages and pages to list what is the same - and what is different - between a '67 and a '69. And if you rely on some stranger from the BB to create that list, who knows what omissions will exist? If you really want to know, get the parts manuals for both models, and see which part numbers differ.

But before getting into that level of detail, why don't you tell us what your objective is: to build a 100 point, 100% correct 10536, or to just get a running car on the road? If the former, you have a long, expensive road ahead and it would be better to start with a complete 10536. If the latter (and the donor shell is fairly complete) then you're pretty much there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It would take pages and pages to list what is the same - and what is different - between a '67 and a '69. And if you rely on some stranger from the BB to create that list, who knows what omissions will exist? If you really want to know, get the parts manuals for both models, and see which part numbers differ.
You aren't exactly some stranger, you are Jay, all knowing and wise in such matters. Kidding aside I totally understand your point and would do exactly that if this actually happens, but seemed worth asked for the big ticket items.


But before getting into that level of detail, why don't you tell us what your objective is: to build a 100 point, 100% correct 10536, or to just get a running car on the road? If the former, you have a long, expensive road ahead and it would be better to start with a complete 10536. If the latter (and the donor shell is fairly complete) then you're pretty much there.
See - very wise question Jay. Don't think a 100 point car would be possible this side of $60,000 which simply isn't in the cards (my cards anyway). So, if anything happens, it would be the later with emphasis paid on getting the body rust free and keeping it that way then actually driving the darn thing. I'd be opportunistic about doing an on-going search for the correct bits over the rest of my natural life.
 

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Hi! I have had some experience with 105s. When I was rebuilding the blue car in my profile pic, was able to get a rusty '71 GTV to provide some trim items. This could be an economical way to get about 80% of the mechanicals and a lot of the body trim. Glass, doors, stainless trim around windows all fit.
What I didn't use, I sold and recovered most of the cost of the rusty car.
 

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The shell can also be the basis for a very nice and correct vintage race car with much a less involved parts search. Randy Pene' recently did this with one he found. The finished vintage racer sold for quite a bit. I wished at the time I had the funds to buy that one.
Still a "driver", unlikely to ever become "junk" again, and allowed to look great going very very fast.
Perfect vintage race cars, are as treasured as restored versions of the same car by those that own them. I've had mine almost 50 years.
Just a thought, and my opinion. The race prep work must be done to a very high, and period correct standard.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi! I have had some experience with 105s. When I was rebuilding the blue car in my profile pic, was able to get a rusty '71 GTV to provide some trim items. This could be an economical way to get about 80% of the mechanicals and a lot of the body trim. Glass, doors, stainless trim around windows all fit.
What I didn't use, I sold and recovered most of the cost of the rusty car.
Hi - thanks for the note. That would be the plan, and it appears I can secure the donor car with glass and seats and stainless as part of 2-for-1 deal. It has a drivetrain but until proven otherwise I am assuming that is scrap.

Thanks for the tip.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The shell can also be the basis for a very nice and correct vintage race car with much a less involved parts search. Randy Pene' recently did this with one he found. The finished vintage racer sold for quite a bit. I wished at the time I had the funds to buy that one.
Still a "driver", unlikely to ever become "junk" again, and allowed to look great going very very fast.
Perfect vintage race cars, are as treasured as restored versions of the same car by those that own them. I've had mine almost 50 years.
Just a thought, and my opinion. The race prep work must be done to a very high, and period correct standard.
Hi Gordon - interesting idea. If this happens I'd want to use her on the road rather than race so not sure this is the path for me. That said it is a clever idea and the current body condition would make it a TON easier to go that path. Doing that right and tracking down all the bits would still be pretty "spendy" however, no? I know what friends have spent on bad races cars, I can only imagine what building a good one costs!
 

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Alfa drivetrains are rebuilable. I would get the lot and then check all of the parts. Quite a few of these have been brought back to good drivers for not too much money. Just spend wisely. IE, no "race" parts !
 

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I drive my vintage racers on the street, club events and track. Fortunately, in this type of build, you have options. An example would be the replacement of my GTA 5:12 semi locked differential, with a 4:56 2L assembly with the aluminum housing slightly re-cut externally to resemble the GTA unit.
Below some examples of track & street cars. The 500TRC was sold some years ago. The GTB and Ausca Spider are currently in my garages. Note the TRC in the SNOW. I was younger and more hardy in those days!
 

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I'll take a stab at this:

The front suspensions are almost entirely interchangeable, with the exception of the "dog bones", ie, the lower A-arm pivot shaft, with early cars using 2 bolts to attach to the body and later cars using 4 bolts. However, the other components will swap from a 2-bolt car to a 4-bolt car and visa- versa.

Some parts are possibly more desirable than others. For instance, the spindle (steering knuckle) from a 2L car is taller than the spindle from an early 105 and yields a more GTA-like steering geometry. Calipers won't swap, though, so if you switch to a 2L spindle you'll have to use 2L ATE calipers.

Rear axle assemblies can be swapped car-to-car, but early Dunlop rear ends won't accept later ATE calipers, and visa-versa. Handbrake cables are unique to each.

Springs and shocks, ball joints and bushings, etc. are generally physically the same for the 105 and 115 cars, though factory spring rates can vary.

Brake master cylinders are probably not interchangeable, as there were several configurations used through the years.

Engines and transmissions can be swapped around, but you may lose originality in the process, if that's important.

Many body panels and parts will interchange -door handles, windows and doors, trunk lids, etc. - though there's an obvious difference between a step-nose hood and a smooth nose hood.

More trim items are showing up on the after market though it's not inexpensive stuff. Reproductions grills for instance, are easy to source, as are tail lights.

This BB is a great resource, though we don't have all the wisdom conveniently organized: search and even use Google, which quite often refers you back here.

Have fun!

Chuck

(2L spindle with 2L ATE calipers on 2-bolt "dog bone" on my '65GT ))
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks Chuck.

Any easy way to tell an ATE vs Dunlap car without taking the wheels off?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I drive my vintage racers on the street, club events and track. Fortunately, in this type of build, you have options. An example would be the replacement of my GTA 5:12 semi locked differential, with a 4:56 2L assembly with the aluminum housing slightly re-cut externally to resemble the GTA unit.
Below some examples of track & street cars. The 500TRC was sold some years ago. The GTB and Ausca Spider are currently in my garages. Note the TRC in the SNOW. I was younger and more hardy in those days!
I would have lived a full life if I was 1/10 as cool as all of that.
 

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The front Dunlops are "lumpier" than the ATEs, older looking, if you will, with an obvious external hard pipe wrapping from inside to outside, easy to see without removing a wheel.

The rears are pretty funky, no mistaking them! Again, easy to spot with wheels on.

Alfa went to ATEs all around pretty early on, so the '69 will have them, but an early step-nose would have the Dunlops all around (unless someone already converted it). There are hours of conversation here about the pros and cons of each system, but if originality is your goal, opinions don't much matter. Function and cost of parts, well, that's another matter.

Keep in mind that there are 4 different front spindles and 2 different sized front ATE calipers out there in addition to the Dunlops, and they don't all interchange. But there are some good threads on that, when the time comes.

Chuck
 

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Don't think a 100 point car would be possible this side of $60,000 which simply isn't in the cards...
OK, good - glad you are realistic about this. As others have written, most trim and mechanical parts will interchange between Alfa GT's. So if you have a complete donor car lined up, especially one as early as a '68, you should have most of your problems solved.

One part that is unique to the stepnose, and also somewhat tough to source, will be the center and outer grilles. One of the photos in your other thread on this subject (why are there two, separate threads?) shows a dash in the shell, so that's good. Tail lights are missing, but new parts are available there.

Your early shell may have gear-driven window mechanisms, while later cars used cables. Dunno if the gear mechanisms are missing from the shell - or the window glass. That may require some parts scrounging.
 
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