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Ahhh….but wasn’t it one of our own who has described how to adjust the rear brakes/park brake from the driver’s seat?
They may be sick of repeating themselves, of course…
An OZ- based member IIRC.
 

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I rebuilt the calipers and clutch a couple of years ago, it was now time to replace synchros, seals, yoke and shaft. Given the couple of thousand miles I put on the Jalapeno (76 Alfetta GT) every year, it should last a while. At least that is what I conveyed to the misses.

Adjusting brakes from drivers seat? Is that a thing or more like a story about a Bunyip? :)
 

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‘Adjusting brakes from drivers seat? Is that a thing or more like a story about a Bunyip? :)
I didn’t dream it, but read it here. The gist was ‘do this, and the brakes self-adjust’. Found it:

Aggie57: “In addition to all the good advice in that old Alfa Digest thread, worth noting that the rear caliper pistons have a self adjusting system in them. Often people spend hours under the car endlessly adjusting them manually when they can achieve the same result by sitting in the car with the foot brake firmly applied and vigorously pumping the handbrake lever up and down.”

Here’s a different take, but also helpful (from Gubi):
“Useful tip: after setting the rear pad clearances, leave the parking brake cable loose and pump the brakes a couple dozen times. Then adjust the cable to just take up the slack. This lets the self adjusters in the pistons do their job so the clearances are correct and the handbrake works in the right number of clicks. I can't take credit for that one: I found it searching some other site a while back. But I tried it today and it does really seem to help in getting the parking brake to work properly first try.”

Didn’t ever have to adjust mine…worked perfectly…so never tested this/these methods.
Oh yeah, Bunyips are real…
 

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replace them with what exactly..you have my full attention since ive got a fetta a gtv6 and well the lloyd as well as the g-sprint on the gtv6 chassis
Just about any Japanese disc brake that includes hand brake actuation ... or FIAT 124/125 calipers (which I have used and they work well). Yes there will be some engineering to mount them, but then the only time you will ever have to touch the rear calipers is to change pads.

Even if I owned a mint Sud or Alfetta/GTV6 I would bin those calipers. They have been replaced with better moderner designs
Pete
 

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Just about any Japanese disc brake that includes hand brake actuation ... or FIAT 124/125 calipers (which I have used and they work well). Yes there will be some engineering to mount them, but then the only time you will ever have to touch the rear calipers is to change pads.

Even if I owned a mint Sud or Alfetta/GTV6 I would bin those calipers. They have been replaced with better moderner designs
Pete
i need to clearly sit down and have a chat with you then.....as ive rebuilt enough sets of the OE ones enough times to be sick of them....and would love something that works as good or better thats less.....tempermental
the set on my gtv6 are sticking again, the set in my lloyd are fine, and the set in the 76 havnt been used in a very long time but i checked the pedal and such and they still seem free....im all for improving
 

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SINGLE piston brakes, Pete? Pshaw. Maybe on a Panda, but we Milano owners are above such feeble things! ;)

Anyway, assuming they're not seized or something I always found the 75/Milano rear brakes to work fine, and I daily drove that car for ten years. I think the biggest problem is that most people just don't adjust them right.

It's not very hard, you just need to know how to do it and there's a few little tricks to it. The tip I found that Ranz reposted above helps a lot. I also suspect the system likes to trap a little air back there, and felt like they generally benefited from a second rebleed after a few miles if air had been introduced into the lines.

Beyond that, if you adjust them properly to start with then the pistons and parking brake will self-adjust properly: you shouldn't need to touch them again until you need new pads.
 

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SINGLE piston brakes, Pete? Pshaw. Maybe on a Panda, but we Milano owners are above such feeble things! ;)

Anyway, assuming they're not seized or something I always found the 75/Milano rear brakes to work fine, and I daily drove that car for ten years. I think the biggest problem is that most people just don't adjust them right.

It's not very hard, you just need to know how to do it and there's a few little tricks to it. The tip I found that Ranz reposted above helps a lot. I also suspect the system likes to trap a little air back there, and felt like they generally benefited from a second rebleed after a few miles if air had been introduced into the lines.

Beyond that, if you adjust them properly to start with then the pistons and parking brake will self-adjust properly: you shouldn't need to touch them again until you need new pads.
Well I don't like them. Had them on my Sud and used to drive me crazy trying to pass the handbrake test every 6 months for the safety inspection.

99% of modern cars have single piston sliding calipers, and IMO anything is better than the Sud/Alfetta/GTV6 calipers, even a rope that you tie to a tree as a handbrake. I accept that it was early in the disc braked handbrake days, but IMO, like single cam v6 timing belts, should never have made it to a production car [Maybe have a park brake drum next to the transaxle and disc brakes out with the wheels]
Pete
 

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105 calipers bolt straight on.
And cut a hole in the floor and when you need to park, poke a crowbar down through the hole to lock an axle :D

Being serious now. Could you make a 105 series backing plate attach to the transaxle and caliper mounting point, and then have the handbrake shoes inside the rear disc, etc. Perfect solution using Alfa parts and a double piston caliper ... nah, just use a better caliper
Pete
 

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Not sure. I thought so as long as they are able to be locked into position. I would imagine any modification to the brakes is going to require an engineer certificate if you want to be road legal.
I was going to fit one on my race car. I can't believe its not a requirement for a race car to have a handbrake. Quiet frankly I think its bloody stupid. Right now there is a guy from the historics in hospital with 14 broken ribs two punctured lungs and broken bones in his feet because his brakes failed. I don't understand the logic in not wanting some kind of supplemental brake at least slow you down a little before you stove into a wall.

Personally I don't have a problem with the original rear calipers.

Anyway I just thought shortlife might like to know there is a bolt on solution.
 

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Yes that is a simple bolt on solution. And yes I thought a handbrake was mandatory for a race car ... but thinking about it I have never seen one on a Formula Ford. Makes the 53 year old me nervous thinking about it, but then a balance bar and separate front and rear circuits should mean a full brake failure is impossible ...

Pete
 

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Well, Pete, if Aggie57’s stand-on-the-brake-pedal-and-pump-the-handbrake-lever method worked for the GTVs, maybe it worked on Suds too…might have saved you and many others (including me, I had a Sud too) a lot of angst. Gotta believe Aggie57 wasn’t making it up.
 

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Yep, that was me talking about adjusting the rear brakes. It does work, and if you pull a rear caliper apart right down to the internal parts of the pistons you can see why. That’s where the automatic adjustment mechanism is, I don’t have an image in front of me but as I recall it relies on being located inside the piston by an internal circlip and my theory was that this can be dislodged leading to the self-adjustment not being able to work as designed.

Either way, I’ve owned a number of Alfetta’s and did several 100,000 miles in them. This technique always served me well, had more trouble trying to set them manually. No idea re. Sud brakes though, sorry.

For our American friends, Bunyips don’t exist any more. They used to but got wiped out by Drop Bears. Nasty little things known to congregate in a place just south of Sydney, ‘Can’ something.
 
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