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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I'm finally getting around to replacing my heater blower fan and pulling the dash out of my 82 Spider. I'm going to replace the bulbs while I'm back there (and foil line /chrome paint the inside of the instruments).

I've checked all my documentation and I can't seem to find a list of bulbs that are used back there. (my skills at reading electrical diagrams are as good as my Mandarin). I'd like to order them from a local shop (Toronto) if possible, but will go to Internatonal Auto Parts if I need to.

Anyone help me out with part numbers /wattages/which ones go where? Thanks in advance,

Woody
 

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They're conventional bulbs as found on any parts counter shelf.

Generally Sylvania #37


Occasionally Sylvania #53


And for the turn signal indicator, lighter, climate control levers and heater fan switch, #2721


Double check to be sure of course, or just take the different ones you pull to the store with you. No need to pay a fortune for what's available locally.
 

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I did the same thing. You can find all the bulbs you need at International Auto Parts
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks to you both for the help. Tifosi, the images are a huge help.
 

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On a related note, does anyone know where to get proper sockets/bases for the 2271/37 wedge type lights?

The bulbs are easy to find, but I've had no luck at local hardware/auto stores or online for the bases. Some DPO discarded several of the sockets in my console (brake/exhaust/etc) and I'd love to hook them back up since the wiring appears fine.
 

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Dash Removal

Woody, if you're able while doing the removal, pics and details would be a hit. I'm preparing to do the same with my 84 and in particular, time involved and what you did with the turn signal light and how would be very interesting.

Thanks,
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'll have my camera ready and document the process. I've got a couple extra pairs of hands which 'should' help reduce the time.
 

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Dash Removal

I'll have my camera ready and document the process. I've got a couple extra pairs of hands which 'should' help reduce the time.
Hi Woody,

Pics, lots of pics will be great.

I am thinking of doing the same with my '91 due to a crack.

I don't think there is much of a difference other than mine having A/C.

Looking forward to the thread.

Vin
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It's a good question. I've just consulted by 1982 car disc, and of course, shows no detail at all for the dash I have (just the later S3 style interiors). Anybody got details on removing the dash of an S2 or, since the dashes are so similar, is it the same?

Thanks all.
 

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The dashes themselves aren't really the problem as they are basically the same AFA shape and mounting method.

It's the instrumentation, ducting and console switch placement/harnessing that's the primary difference. (well, that and the monopod cluster is attached the dash by a different means than pods)

EG: S2 and S3 dual pod have gauges where a monopod has AC ducts.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Finally!!

Who Hoo! A year later and I finally got at this project. I’ve decided to remove the dash, centre console etc from my 1982 Spider to accomplish the following.

a) Replace my never operating heater blower motor.
b) Improve brightness of instruments lights (as per Willie’s post) http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/spider-1966-up/7524-brighter-instrument-lights-my-solution.html)
c) Replace water drainage hoses
d) Fix horn (as per John M) http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/electrical/32277-internal-steering-wheel-horn-short.html
e) Clean everything!

Added since I opened up the dash

a) Fix internal supports for the centre console (broken by PO)
b) Paint centre console -- For this I need your input. It’s discoloured and I would like to brighten it up…but matching colour with the original dash (in great shape) is tough.

I’m going to break this post into sections with estimated time to accomplish, how it was accomplished and what was involved. Here is the before picture. If you want me to take pictures of anything else, or have advice, please let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
1. Remove Steering Wheel ( 15 minutes, but if the wheel is stuck…this can take hours)

This is covered elsewhere and since I had removed the steering wheel only a couple of years ago to replace the stock assembly, it was quite easy. I removed the centre cap, pulled out the rubber insulator plug, removed the nut holding the steering wheel in place, and it came off easily.

In one picture, you can see I disconnected the horn wire previously. A mechanic tried to remove the steering wheel for me previously and failed. In doing so, he bent something in the horn mechanism / steering wheel assembly and the horn now sounds on turns. John M has a great solution to this but my horn assembly is a little different. I’ll be fixing this after I reassemble everything else and will fll in the solution here when I find it.

Four screws are located on the underside of the column covers. Remove these and the covers separate easily. The bottom cover is still attached by the dimmer switch and wire, while the top one is wedged under the instrument pods. It can be removed now with effort or after the pods are removed. **The column stock switch assembly can be removed as well if you think you might catch on it while working. They can be delicate and are expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
2. Instrument Pod Removal. (ninety minutes)

The front pods covers (black) are easy to remove. There are two bolts located on the bottom side of each pod. They are easily reached with a wrench and removed. The covers come with little effort.

Removing the gauges is a bit more work. Screws are located on the left and right edges of each back pod. They hold the gauges in place and, for the speedometer, provide a grounding spot.

To remove the tachometer
a) Remove the two securing screws
b) Tilting the left edge of the gauge into the pod you can see three lights and three wires (pink, black and white)
c) Remove the bulb receptacles by pulling gently on them. They can be twisted left and right if needed to loosen. At this point I used tape and a sharpy to mark where each bulb came from.
d) The tach’s input wires are secured by nuts to screw posts protruding from the back. The pink and white wires have an insulating washer separating them from the back of the gauge, where the black is secured directly to the back of the tach.
e) Remove the nuts and washers and the tach easily comes out of the pod. I wrote on the back of the tach which wires go where.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Instruments Continued

Removing the speedometer is a little more difficult, but not much.

a) Remove the two securing screws (the one on the right also provides a ground and should be cleaned before reassembling)

b) The speedometer is also held in place by the speedo cable. I was able to feed some in through the firewall to give enough slack to turn the gauge’s left edge into the pod. At this point you can see a) the speedo cable attachment, b) three lights (two for illumination, one for the battery light) and c) a ground cable.

c) Remove the speedo cable by loosening the collar on the cable. This may be wired in to prevent tampering with the odometer. Since I don’t plan on selling Lolita, I didn’t worry about breaking this. Once removed, the three lights can be extracted by gently pulling and /or lightly twisting them. Again I marked the wires and the back of the gauge.

The final sight isn’t very attractive. I taped up the wires to keep them out of the way.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
3.3. Centre Console (two hours, including stereo removal)

Before attacking the centre console, I recommend having the following close at hand. Green painter’s tape, sharpie marker, zip lock bags (small and large) and a camera. Mark and bag everything as you go. Take pictures to facilitate reassembly.

a) Remove the gear shift knob. On mine, there were three hex screws that needed to be loosened, and the knob pulled off.

b) On my spider there were eight screws that needed to be removed. Two at the front, bottom. Two at the front, sides. Two at the top, sides. And two on the driver’s side, one beside where the driver’s foot sits, the other on the driver’s side closer to the front.

c) Remove the two screws securing the heater controls to the console. Gentle with the plastic insert as they can be brittle.

At this time, the top console piece can be lifted up from the bottom. All of the switches, lights, controls and the clock (and, in this case, iPhone dock) are still attached. I progressively worked from the bottom
to the top removing and labeling each wire bundle with the sharpy and tape. (The tape isn’t shown in the pictures because I was originally just writing on the wires/harnesses).

Next, remove the bolt securing the side piece to the floor. At this time the side piece can be removed.

I found that a support had been broken by the PO and will fabricate a fix now that I have it out of the car. (In the photos one is of the intact side, the other without the proper support.

At this point my phone / camera ran out of batteries. Not bad timing though, as the next step is stereo removal. This is different for each car.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
4. Gauge removal. (45 minutes)

The set of three gauges now need to be disconnected. All gauges have three wire connectors, the centre one on each is the ground. The other two have insulator washers.

The fuel gauge has two lights (illumination and low fuel).
The electrical connectors can be removed by gently pulling on them. The bulb assemblies can also be removed with gentle pulling and / or slight twisting.

I made a diagram recording the location of all wires as labeling the wires was difficult.

At this time, you can also remove the wire from the glove compartment light. It’s a pink wire and attaches to the left side of the light. The right side is the ground and does not need to be removed.

**The interior of the glove can be removed to facilitated access to the gauges, I found I didn’t need to do this.

I'll cover the removal of the gauges from the dash in a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
5. Dash removal (20 minutes)

Using an excellent post by Flamebero (http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/spider-1966-up/169494-dash-removal.html), locating the mounting bolts for the dash was surprisingly easy.

a) Loosen the wing nuts at the centre points of the dash. These are relatively easy to reach, but may be a little seized. It took me a while to get them loosened.

b) Remove the bolts located at the front corners of the dash. The driver’s side bolt is used as a ground for four or five wires. This should be cleaned before reassembly.

c) I recommend removing the bottom screw from the interior windshield trim on both sides. The dash fits snuggly and could catch on them on removal…ripping the dash.

d) Disconnect the vent hoses from the vent outlets by gently turning and pulling on the hoses.

At this time, the dash can be removed by pulling up and forward, revealing the following (the foot is mine and was not behind the dash)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
6. Heater blower motor replacement (two hours)

I didn’t want to remove the heater core, so using ghnl’s post (http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/spider-1966-up/132059-s3-heater-fan-r-r-drain-holes.html)

a. I removed the four bolts securing the fan and vent assembly to the heater

b. Disconnected the controller cable and two electrical connections (high speed and low speed).

c. Moved the carpet as much as possible.

d. Slid/pried/wedged the bottom assembly out to the side.

The motor was totally seized and was more rust that motor. While it might be repairable, I had a working one on hand. I removed the fan/motor assembly by depressing the rubber tabs and disconnecting the electrical connections to the housing.

At this point, reverse the procedure to reinstall everything. Reinstalling the back bolts is a pain in the butt. It may help to enlist smaller hands to help.

NOTE: test the fan before reinstalling.
 
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