Alfa Romeo Forums banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Administrator
'66 Sprint GT, '67 Duetto, '70 BMW 2800CS
Joined
·
12,927 Posts
In addition to the threads that Steve suggests, here's one that I started last summer when my fan motor died: http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/164-168-1991-1995/167193-cooling-fan-substitute.html

Diagnosing my dead motor was pretty easy - the fan blades were difficult to spin by hand - clearly the rear bearing had all of its lubricant cooked out by the front header, and the motor was binding up. Your problem could be something else (temp sensor, wiring, relays), so by all means to through the troubleshooting guide that Steve posted.

I chose to install an aftermarket fan, rather than repair my motor. Purists hated that strategy, but I figured that if the original motor only lasted 19 years / 120,000 miles, then I should try something different.

There's also a wealth of information on 164 clutches here on the BB. As a 164 owner, I predict that you will soon get very good with the BB's search function! In addition to the BB, another great 164 resource is at: http://www.digest.net/alfa/FAQ/164/notes0.htm
 

·
Administrator
'66 Sprint GT, '67 Duetto, '70 BMW 2800CS
Joined
·
12,927 Posts
could you point me toward the best place to buy things like resistors and temp switches for this car? thanks!
By "temp switch" I assume you mean the thing that screws into the radiator, and tells the relays & fan motor when to come on. There is a discussion at: http://www.digest.net/alfa/FAQ/164/notes_07.htm#sender that suggests substituting a Volkswagen Golf switch for the Alfa part. The VW switch is less expensive, more readily available, and switches on at lower temperatures. I found one at my local German import car parts supplier (Mesa Performance in Costa Mesa, Ca.). You have to cut the wires off your Alfa switch, and crimp on connectors that attach to the terminals on the VW switch - pretty simple.

Note that these switches really contain two separate switches: one for low temperature and another for high temperature. The first turns on the fan through that resistor, producing low speed operation. Then if the coolant temperature continues to rise, the second switch turns on the other relay that bypasses the resistor, producing high speed.

Note also that that connector on the fan motor, behind the head shield, is another possible failure point. The plastic the connector is made from tends to melt, producing an intermittant connection.

Dunno where you would find a replacement resistor. Not sure if they are available new. APE might be a source for used ones.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top