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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Rod length adjustment is important. Expanded too long, and the return port in the master cylinder will never be exposed. Too short and you'll never get the "throw" that you need.

Did you eventually get out the bottom bolt on the master? The original bolt is an Allen-head, not a hex head.
Yes, new master, slave, and flex line are fully installed and fully bled.

I'm going to order a new clutch pivot today. When I install it, I'll reset the master rod to spec.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Yup, pulled up on the clutch and it popped back into place. But now it collapses again whenever pressed.

I just ordered the aftermarket pivot and pin from John Ortakales.

I also reset the master cylinder control rod to spec of 134mm.

To be continued next weekend....
 

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FYI, You don't need to go through a gallon of fluid .. especially on the clutch.. The Brake master neither if you can figure out a way to seal all three reservoir caps to hold pressure. .. On the power bleeder I don't use fluid in the tank of the bleeder.. just the reservoir and and pressure from the empty power bleeder tank.. much less drama and the Power bleeder folks approve.
 

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My trajectory mirrors yours. Lots of brake fluid, lots of bleeding (knuckles, then master, then slave) and lots of swearing -- only to find the biggest hassle was going to become the pivot pin. Oh, good times await you! It's not complex, it's not rocket surgery, but holy mother of annoying, the pin is tops.

Follow the threads here. The John Ortakes pin (and shaft) are a solid investment. Once you get the old crap out, then putting the new one into place isn't that difficult. All in, the project only took me 3 light years. #1, get that pedal box as pulled away from the firewall as you can possibly imagine. If your Master is fully disconnected, you'll make life much easier.

Bang. Pound. Punch, Pop. it'll come out. ALSO, before you start the install you your new pin, buy some fishing line.

Starting here Broken Clutch Pivot my journey begins a few posts down the thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
FYI, You don't need to go through a gallon of fluid .. especially on the clutch.. The Brake master neither if you can figure out a way to seal all three reservoir caps to hold pressure. .. On the power bleeder I don't use fluid in the tank of the bleeder.. just the reservoir and and pressure from the empty power bleeder tank.. much less drama and the Power bleeder folks approve.
Well, yeah, I suppose I used imprecise language. That gallon was the cumulative volume of many attempts over two days to try and get some decent throw on the slave actuator. Tried it every way except standing on my head, although I reckon standing on my head may come in handy when I'm trying to dig that pivot out of the footwell. 😁
 

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"So my theory is that the weld on the pivot was already on the way out (see prior adjustment to master rod), and then when the master died my mashing on the clutch pedal with all my might finished it off.

Does this theory make sense for my current symptoms?"


Yes-- you got it right, Brad. The clutch pivot arm was apparently breaking loose, and the PO left it for the next guy-- lucky you!
BTW rotate the slave cylinder so the bleed fitting is at 12 0'clock, and then pressure bleed until you get solid stream of fluid. I sometimes bleed that circuit progressively, starting at the master cylinder outlet fitting, then to the hose fitting, then out to the slave-- with good results. You're smart to replace that short hose with the stainless braided one, also. You'll never have to fiddle with it again cuz it will not delaminate on the ID, and plug up the flow. I feel that this is what causes the backpressure and contributes to weld failure on the pivot arms.

Back to the pivot arm R & R, it's obvious you've done a lot of wrenching, and it will serve you well with this Spider! To replace the pivot arm, you remove the pedal box off the firewall. There's a ton of discussion here on the BB on this job, and it's not terrible to do. The tubing on the master cylinder will bend just enough so you can pull the pedal box away without disconnecting the brake lines-- just go easy with them. The clutch pedal is fixed to the shaft inside the box with a tapered pin, and a locknut on it. It has to go back in like it came out, with the flat against the shaft slot. But you'll see all that, no problem. A bit of silicone around the edge of the pedal box when you reinstall it. The correct distance between the clevis pin and the end of the piston rod at the M/C is about 5.25 inches, IIRC. Lube the clevis pin when you're done.

You might want to get a copy of "The Alfa Owner's Bible", by the late Pat Braden. Pat was an authority and gladly shared muchissimo information in detail on Alfa 105/115 series maintenance. Very enjoyable reading, and lots of insight into the brilliant engineering of these cars.

Welcome, as they say, to "the asylum"! :LOL: :LOL:
 
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Thank you for that good advice, alfaloco. Best wishes to you in Lexington. I'm a Kentucky boy and went to school for many years at UK. I miss it.

I'm on the fence about whether to disconnect the clutch and brake master cylinders prior to tackling the pivot shaft.

Lord knows, the clutch doesn't need any more bleeding, but flushing the brakes is definitely on my baselining to-do list. I'm weighing the benefit of making the pivot easier, versus the risk of having a harder time flushing the brakes after air is introduced into the system.

What do y'all think?
 

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For some reason the clutch is always more vexing...bleeding.. I haven't tried it but gravity bleeding on the clutch might help.. I have experts who swear by the method .. not at it...on brakes... and it works well. It might take a 6 pack to do but it does work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I was replacing my fuel sender gasket and saw that the strainer sock on the bottom of the fuel pump was missing. I searched around, but none of the auto parts stores listed any part compatible with the Alfa. Not wanting to dilly-dally waiting for a sock strainer to be shipped to me, I persevered in my search. Turns out the Bosch 68001 fits perfectly, and it's carried in stock at NAPA. The part also fits a ton of late 80's/early 90's GM cars and trucks, so it is a fairly ubiquitous part.
 

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Thank you for that good advice, alfaloco. Best wishes to you in Lexington. I'm a Kentucky boy and went to school for many years at UK. I miss it.

I'm on the fence about whether to disconnect the clutch and brake master cylinders prior to tackling the pivot shaft.

Lord knows, the clutch doesn't need any more bleeding, but flushing the brakes is definitely on my baselining to-do list. I'm weighing the benefit of making the pivot easier, versus the risk of having a harder time flushing the brakes after air is introduced into the system.

What do y'all think?
With a Motive Power pressure bleeder, you're miles ahead if you need to bleed the bubbles. I might suggest you crack the fittings loose at the M/C's, to allow the tubing to swivel around a bit, but not so much as to introduce air. Then snug them up when you get the pedal box moved forward. Once you're ready to mount the box again, loosen the fitting nuts and bring the M/C's back into position. That can reduce the twist on the tubing-- and maybe prevent damage.
I know you're looking at a gazillion parts to order about now, but believe me if you get Speed Bleeders on the brake calipers and the slave cylinder, with your MP pressure bleeder, getting the bubbles out is a piece of cake. One person bleeding, truly.
 
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Rod length adjustment is important. Expanded too long, and the return port in the master cylinder will never be exposed. Too short and you'll never get the "throw" that you need.

Did you eventually get out the bottom bolt on the master? The original bolt is an Allen-head, not a hex head.
On the master cylinder R & R job, both the GTV 6 and the Spider, I found my favorite tool down in the footwell was a 1/4" drive ratchet with extension, and a ball-end hex socket bit. Plus a pillow across the door sill...:rolleyes:
 

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Always been a Toyota guy and have gotten comfortable doing all 3 banana or easier jobs by myself.

Decided I needed a project, something with curves, Italian flair, and a nasty exhaust note.
I found an 87 Graduate for a decent price, it test drove well enough, and the deal was done.

Now, I hope this isn't an omen, but I had no sooner pulled out of the POs garage to drive it home when the clutch master cylinder decided to puke fluid. I drove it home without a working clutch, parked it in the garage, and prepared myself for the inevitable disapproving looks from my wife.

The car has surprisingly little rust, the engine is smooth and quiet, and the top is pristine. She needs a few things though. Okay, a lot of things...
Re the oil/grease underbody…check that your olio filler cap has a proper gasket.

I finally realized mine did not and for years oil was leaking out and running down the engine and coating the underbody.

I bought a sheet of cork and fabricated a gasket and not zero oil leak.

GLWTP
 

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Some of the issues
  • leaks oil from about 8 different places
  • tires are 16 years old (spare is 23 years old)
  • clutch issue noted previously, which I'm fixing today
  • driver seat vinyl is ripped (can't find replacements online for this year and color)
  • washer nozzles broken off and reservoir cap busted
  • carpet looks like poop
  • gas smell in trunk, ordered a new sender gasket
  • battery unsecured
  • lug wrench long gone
  • spare wheel needs a repaint
  • door checks look like death
  • driver inside door handle is a little sticky
  • driver rear axle seal leak
  • front shock lower nut missing
  • Cracked #4 exhaust manifold tube
  • On-center steering is very vague
  • I'm assuming it will need a ton of other things once I get into it
EDIT - Poked around under the car some more today. Guibo is fairly new, as are the motor mounts. Driveshaft has enough slung grease to suggest someone had been servicing the u-joints at some point. Ball joints, wheel bearings, tie rods all feel tight. Definitely a lot of transmission fluid from up high where the shifter enters. No rust on the brake lines. Hoses are not original. Had a leak from the brake master cylinder at some point (paint gone), but does not appear to be current. Haven't cracked open the brakes yet.

Opened the driver door and a small piece of plastic fell out. Traced it to the corner of the door buffer, and when I touched what remained of the buffer still attached to the door, it crumbled into 7 pieces. Wow. I guess I'll throw a couple of those into my next parts order.

It's funny going from one car make to another, how differently the engineering is. I ran into this with a previous Porsche. The Germans design things so differently than Toyota does, and boy those Italians take it a step further. I've already broken a couple things on the car trying to remove them, since I was expecting them to come apart the Toyota way. I gotta slow down and look before any more ham-handed disassembly.

I look forward to getting this car up to snuff with the help of this forum. I know I'll need lots of help :)
Greg, I have a black vinyl seat cover with the correct sheen to it, bought from Classic Alfa in the U.K.. I only needed the paggenger side, & if you want it, $25 +shipping. It is brand new & the cover fit my '86 Graduate better than new.

Chief Bre 9
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Greg, I have a black vinyl seat cover with the correct sheen to it, bought from Classic Alfa in the U.K.. I only needed the paggenger side, & if you want it, $25 +shipping. It is brand new & the cover fit my '86 Graduate better than new.

Chief Bre 9
Chief, that is an extremely kind offer, and I thank you. If it were only tan, I'd be ecstatic. Black won't do me much good though.

Of course, if I had posted pictures of my car, you would've known what color my seats are. I'm waiting to get it off the jack stands and into the sunlight for a proper photo. Hopefully this weekend. :)
 

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install a long clear vinel hose to the slave cly.. nipple on the top side// clear vinel hose at least 36 inches.. route the hose from the nipple up thru the engine/ body shell, so i is above the engine.. then insert the other end of the hose in a clear water bottle 1/2 filled with brake fuild.. this way the hose will be above the master cly.. then crack the bleeder open.. and watch the ' tiny bubbles, in the brake fuild, rise to the top, and into the bottle.. and keep the master filled..i never understood why people like to lay under the car,, uncomfortable trying this job.. my was is soo easy. and no chance of getting air back into the system... after all the bubbles air out,, close the bleed nipple
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Finally, some good news.. This thing has been up on jack stands for 2 weeks, and every time I touch it, I find something broken. Well, today I got that clutch pivot swapped out, and holy cow, the clutch works now! Forward progress!

I'm going to swap the tranny fluid while it's still up on stands, and then I'm going to take it for a little drive. Maybe I'll go buy some tires.
 
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