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so I am going to be painting my duetto in the comming months, more than likely with a base coat/clear urethane. but I am curious, does anyone know what type of paint these cars were painted with from the factory? was it an acrylic lacquer or nitro lacquer?
 

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At the time they were shot with synthetic enamel single stage paint. The two most common suppliers (as far as I've seen to date) were Glasurit and Sikkens. To this day, those are still the two best paint companies out there. Good luck with the project and post some pictures.
 

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Yo Akitaman, Would you happen to know offhand how far back the factory used synthetic enamel? Both Pininfarina and Bertone? For example would a 61 Giulietta Sprint also be enamel? How about a 57 Giulietta spider? thanks, Steve
 

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The two most common suppliers (as far as I've seen to date) were Glasurit and Sikkens.
My car was done with Sikkens 12 yrs ago. Looks like it was shot yesterday.:)
 

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Peter
You've been out in that Texas sun too long!:D

pcelenta
At the risk of being stoned by the crowd, I am going to disagree with akitaman.:eek: 750/101 Giuliettas, Giulias and Duetto's and many other model ALFAs up till the early 1970's were painted with DUCO Montecatini nitrocellulose lacquer. This was a DuPont product commonly used as an automotive finish since the 1920's. DUCO was the type or formula name; just as Centari or Imron is used today.
Montecatini was an Italian paint manufacturer in which DuPont had an interest. It was also conveniently located in Milan.

Duetto paint label:
 

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Okay let me add to this. The earliest cars were hand rubbed with a varnish. The people who did this for a living, didn't live long. The earliest a car would have had anything other than hand rubbed varnish is 1923. In 1923 a brush applied lacquer was starting to be used. By 1926 a few colors were optional. Green, Ruby Reds (some what dark red), and Blue and of course Black and white. By 1928 all car companies were using Lacquers. These lacquers did not last in sunlight very long. No UV protection in the design. By the mid 50's George Barris ( the famous hot rod builder) developed a formula that made the paint last. This was premiered at the Oakland road show in 1958. In a heavy flake orange car. This is the first of the two stage paints. But by this time Nitrocellulose Lacquer became more common. Nitrocellulose lacquer is still out there today (just called lacquer). Lacquer when compared to enamel is way better. It's stronger, holds its shine better and last longer. From a car manufactures prospective enamel was more ideal. It's cheaper, and more importantly, it dries faster. Much faster. Lacquer will take upwards of 24 hours to dry. Enamel takes just a few hours. Longer dry time more chance for a problem to occur.
With all that said, in the 60's a car could have been painted with either. late 60's more likely to be enamel. Early 60's lacquer.
 

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Touch up paint is normally enamel. But any good auto paint store that sells Glasurit, Sikkens or Spies Hecker will have the paint code in the archives (color library) and can make you as little as a half pint.
 

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.... At the risk of being stoned by the crowd, I am going to disagree with akitaman.:eek: 750/101 Giuliettas, Giulias and Duetto's and many other model ALFAs up till the early 1970's were painted with DUCO Montecatini nitrocellulose lacquer. This was a DuPont product commonly used as an automotive finish since the 1920's. DUCO was the type or formula name; just as Centari or Imron is used today.
Montecatini was an Italian paint manufacturer in which DuPont had an interest. ...
GTD: Thanks for making this post a few years ago. My Duetto is about to be painted, and I have bee getting grief from the paint vendors over the label on my trunk lid - which is EXACTLY like yours.

That said, I am still on the hunt for an appropriate replacement from Glasurit and Sikkens. Can anyone provide a code?

- Michael
 

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Matching ALFA paint codes

Michael
If you are concerned about loosing the DUCO paint decal ... don't be; user459 has reproduced accurate duplicates. :) Contact Mr. Rushbrook for a decal.

If you're attempting to achieve an exact color match by referencing an extinct paint code ... don't waste your time. ALFA used multiple paint codes and names over the years for what appears as the same color paint. :eek:
While we can postulate on forums such as this about their reasons for doing so ... we can't accurately supply numbers or paint formulas which produce exact color matches to original (40 to 50 year old) paint.

I'd suggest choosing an area on your Duetto with original undisturbed paint such as the trunk floor between the gas tank and spare tire well (in the area of the Pininfarina chassis numbers) or behind the door cards. Avoid using areas which were exposed to sunlight and the outside elements (such as the glove-box door) as well as painted but unpolished areas such as the inside of the gas fill flap.
Compare this area with samples sourced from a paint supply shop or wholesaler. Most shops will mix up a sample for free. Use color chips as a starting point and find a color match that suits you.

OR

You can ignore all I've written and refer to the following vintage color charts ... then select Bianco Pininfarina 008 as the perfect match.

BUT...

Before you go running to your paint supplier for a bucket of this; be aware of that fine print: "kann nicht gemischt werden"
Translation: cannot be mixed

This is a polite way of saying that Pininfarina White was whatever Pininfarina mixed up and sprayed that day ... and therefore not capable of being accurately duplicated. ;)
 

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Perfect description !!

I used that exact process when painting my '66 and it turned out the same as original.
Also, note that for touch ups Rustolium white is the same color ! AKA refrigerator white ;^)
Randy
 

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GTD:

Excellent post for my use, and certainly a good reference for the forum. Those paint cards are nice time capsules. My understanding is close to yours - Farina White is arbitrary and capricious.

The attached photo shows my paint code, identical to the one of the above. The area was protected during the media blast and primer coats, with my expectation that it would continue to be displayed inside the trunk after the repaint.

Sikkens's on-line code machine did produce a formula for Bianco Farina, as AR201, applicable 1966-1967, color map 493B2, formula CPU 9*03*45.00. I am going to have a go at that on Monday with the shop.

- Michael
 

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