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Apparently the interior is the US market trim - original and even rarer. I actually think far cooler than the heavy leather interior. I have seem one spider with the same interior .
For all I know, the notion that this is supposed to be a US market interior is incorrect (note the fact that the seller's description says "1st delivery: Italy" and the Euro/metric instruments). All 102 Sprints I've seen had this combination of cloth (color always "grigio fantasia") and surrounding trim in "artificial leather", available in "blu Venezia", "blu pavone", and "beige" (although I've never seen one in beige).
 

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Ruedi
In your opinion this looks correct for a 2000 sprint? Any production numbers for 2.0 Sprints?
Thanks.
I should also note that the leather interior on my grigio 2600 is original. The dash pad and knee bolster as well.
Headliner too. I just redid the italian wool carpets using the original's as templates and binding my own pieces.
I gave the originals to Mike at World Uph for a better price on the bulk carpet. So if you need a carpet set for your 2600 Sprint, they have the best ones.
This car was last owned by the late Luccio Boscolo from Padova IT/Washington St. USA
 

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Ruedi
In your opinion this looks correct for a 2000 sprint? Any production numbers for 2.0 Sprints?
Thanks.
Assessing 102 Sprints (and early 2600 Sprints) is tricky because of several changes and/or variations that happened during production.

Let's start with production numbers: I think Fusi's list for 1960-61 is probably the most reliable source (see this thread), but it doesn't tell the whole story, which I do not (yet) pretend to know. I'm convinced that Fusi's list contains at least 1 significant error: He lists 2 chassis number ranges for 102 Sprints in 1961, one in the old numbering style AR 10205.xxxxx, the other as 10205.106xxx, which actually was stamped in the new numbering style "AR 106xxx" (without the preceding AR*10205* -- please note that a similar number change happened to 102 Spiders, changing from AR10204.xxxxx to "AR 102xxx", and Giulietta TI G.d 10109 and Giulietta SS 10120 cars). In my opinion, the total number of 102 Sprints produced is probably near the last three digits of the highest chassis number (AR 106660) in Fusi's list. If I ever get access to the Alfa archive again, I certainly will dedicate a significant amount of time to researching 102 Sprints and shedding light on some of these confusing numbers -- there might be some hand-written notes in the ledgers that could provide some insights.

I mentioned elsewhere that there seem to be 2 distinct body styles of 102 Sprints, with respect to how panels were stamped, most easily noticeable in the difference of the engine hood and trunk lid support structure (either a tubular frame or pressed steel profiles -- those with tubular frames possibly having alloy skins). These differences may or may not correlate with the numbering style (e.g. AR 10205 cars having tubular frames, AR 106xxx cars having pressed steel profiles) but I would not bet on that -- it may just be that from a specific date forward, the new numbering scheme may have been used on both body types. I would need to see more cars to get more statistical evidence to be sure.

Fusi lists only 185 cars with AR 10205.xxxxx chassis numbers, but creating and abandoning sheet metal stamps for such little numbers does not make sense to me -- I presume there must have been a minimum run of 500 to 1,000 units coming off these presses, hence the above-mentioned difference in body styles was carried forward into the first series of 2600 Sprint. And, to be clear, I'm not talking about what is generally referred to as Sprint/Spider S1 and S2 introduced in 1964, but an earlier difference within the Sprint S1 series. At some point in time, a collection of Bertone body numbers stamped in the engine compartment of 102 and 106 Sprints may give us more insights about the production quantities. FWIW, it is possible that Bertone may have had 2 production lines in 2 different plants for these cars, as part of Bertone's transition from Corso Peschiera to Grugliasco and ramping up for larger production volume.

Now, some comments on the car shown at the beginning of this thread: The engine compartment shows some features I have seen in cars with AR 10205 numbers (but as stated above, this numbering may have been driven by production date rather than body style). I think the seats and door panels are original. I'm not sure about the carpet (especially the area around the shift stick) is original, but I give it the benefit of the doubt right now. It could be one of the variations I alluded to above, and there was a change listed in parts catalog amendment #002-685 that affects the carpet area around the shift stick (and what that change exactly looked like, I'm not sure as of yet). The rubber floor mats for sure are not original -- original rubber mats I've seen (only 1 set so far) look VERY different (as a side note, it may be worth mentioning that the parts catalog doesn't show any rubber mats at all, but they are listed in amendment #002-685). The dashboard shows an extra switch next to the steering column, and an extra switch (battery main power switch?) and an extra instrument below the dashboard -- not original, and certainly a cosmetic boo-boo that isn't easy to correct without sacrificing more originality. Note also that the seams of the vinyl dashboard cover are coming apart near the instrument cluster (which is usually a normal function of age). Note also that there are no pictures of the roof liner, which may be stained and/or falling apart in some areas due to condensation that normally happens under the roof. Then, of course, is the added brake booster, which may have messed significantly with the intake manifold: It is possible that the water jacket was drilled through for getting vacuum from the intake runners (i.e. no more coolant in the intake manifold), which may lead to cold start issues and/or poor engine performance in cold weather.

That being said, I think it's an OK car. There are some good points, and some questionable ones. Overall, the car gives me an impression of having lived a mostly unmolested life.
 

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Mille Grazie Ruedi...
I have noticed the difference in construction of the body panels you mentioned in your overview, my 2 cars 822269 and 823229
only 960 cars apart but completely different panel stampings and construction, both being S1 cars as you mention. There is a lot to digest here and again many thanks for sharing your knowledge. I will reach out to the seller for more information, and undercarriage
photo's
Ric
 

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Ric,

I can't quote him exactly, but Jay N has often remarked that the Sprint production numbers may be significantly fictionalized. His opinion - based upon what research I don't know - is that the claimed run of around 700 cars may have been what was intended, but that the sales results may have resulted in a great many of them being finished as 2600s.

Just passing on his comments, and no claim of veracity.
 

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Thanks Don, That makes sense. I like the idea of the 2.0 in the big sprint. I would ask you for the hot rod mods that you implemented on your first Touring car build if this comes together.
so far no response from the seller.
Grazie
 

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Hi all.
I just read the thread and saw the servo brake. I have the same one mounted in my spider and the vacuum takes it from the intake manifold in the part next to the distributor.
 

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Good morning all. I am interested in repainting in the original shade of "Blu Pavone", but can't seem to find a modern code to replicate the color. Can anyone help me with a code or formula for this intense non-metallic blue, please?

I also would like the modern code for Grigio Biacca or Bianco Spino (same color?). Can anyone help me with the info needed to simply go to a PPG or other auto paint shop and have them mix up the colors for me here in the USA>

Thanks!!!
 

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Good morning all. I am interested in repainting in the original shade of "Blu Pavone", but can't seem to find a modern code to replicate the color. Can anyone help me with a code or formula for this intense non-metallic blue, please?

I also would like the modern code for Grigio Biacca or Bianco Spino (same color?). Can anyone help me with the info needed to simply go to a PPG or other auto paint shop and have them mix up the colors for me here in the USA>

Thanks!!!
Welcome to AlfaBB. These questions are not about 102 Sprint, so I'll ask the mods to move it to another thread.

I've only ever seen once a reference to Blu Pavone (in a 2001 magazine article, i.e. not from an official source), listing it as being available between 1951 and 1953 (which would mean it may have been used on early 1900 or 6C 2500 Freccia d'Oro) -- but without paint code. I've never seen a formula for mixing it, either.

Grigio Biacca and Bianco Spino are not the same color and even within each color, there were several variations over time. You can find more information about these two paints on the Glasurit Color Online web site although it may take some time to get used to how to navigate this site.
Grigio Biacca (AR-702), aka Gray and Light Grey, was available between about 1950 and 1970.
Bianco Spino (AR-013), aka White, Ice White, Pearl, Chalk, Hawthorn, Ermine White, Pearl White, was available between about 1960 and 1981.
 

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I see it was also available on the 1966 2600 Sprint. Here is a picture off of the Internet showing the Blu Pavone peeking out in the engine bay. Can anyone help with a code? Fiat also had a blu pavone, code 483, but I have no way of knowing if it is the same blue.
 

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I see it was also available on the 1966 2600 Sprint. Here is a picture off of the Internet showing the Blu Pavone peeking out in the engine bay. Can anyone help with a code? Fiat also had a blu pavone, code 483, but I have no way of knowing if it is the same blue.
Blu Pavone certainly was not a 2600 Sprint standard color -- hence, no paint code available.
The color in the picture you posted is most likely Bluette (AR-327).
 

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It is folly to think a paint code will result in the color you expect. It just does not reliably work that way.

If you wish to match a color, you must find an example and have it computer matched. If you cannot find an example, you find a artist at paint mixing and work with them until you see what you like.
 
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