Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
818 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This picture appeared on a web site called the Jalopy Journal in a section called 'racing from 1894--1944'. My one time long ago knowledge of the early racing cars is long since fogged over but I'm thinking that this is a 'P' series. The picture is said to be from 1932 and the car is #33 between the two Bugattis.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,409 Posts
I found the picture in here, with the following description:

"Avus 1932
#32 von Morgen (Bugatti 51139)
#33 Caracciola (Alfa Romeo)
#46 Divo (Bugatti 54210)
#36 Willams (Bugatti 51)"

According to this Wikipedia page, the race in Berlin, Germany, took place on 22 May 1932. This page also contains the picture below which must have been taken right after the one shown above. In the foreground is the 7.1 litre Mercedes SSKL #41, driven by von Brauchitsch, who won the race in by passing Caracciola's Alfa in the last lap after an almost legendary battle for the lead that lasted more than half the race. The race report here says "While Caracciola in the nimble Alfa Romeo always gained an advantage in the corners, the bulky Mercedes-Benz made up the lost time on the straights." -- the two straights were 9.5 km (almost 6 miles) long.



This pictures above and below were taken by photographer Georg Pahl, available from the German Federal Image Archive (Bundesarchiv). Note the different color of the radiator shroud in the picture below, which shows Caracciola in front of the Alfa (this may be a different car according to the race report here, which says Caracciola tried a red car and a white car in training, so it's possible the car that entered the race was a hybrid of both cars). Interestingly, the archive has no pictures showing the Alfa after the race started.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,807 Posts
Wonderful photos. There is footage of the actual race early in this video. Imagine the sound of all those fabulous engines. It must have been amazing to be there.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
818 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Great video and I agree about the lack of audio. A lot of things got my attention, too many to list here, but the two that stand out are 1. how hard the drivers had to work, and 2. how fast the mechanic bailed out after the gigantic spin.

Thanks for posting this feature. The story keeps getting better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
491 Posts
Worth mentioning that the AVUS practically is (or rather was, as it is part of the Autobahn leading into Berlin today) two straights and two curves at the end , a true top speed course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,409 Posts
Sometimes, my heart breaks a little bit when stuff that should be given to a museum and become a public good (or should go in the public domain because of its historical significance) is sold off at auction. Have a look at the Ladenburg auction selling documents from Rudolf Caracciola estate, especially Lots 1077-1103 with correspondence about Alfa Romeo's 1932-33 racing seasons.

The picture below is Lot 1077, with Alfa Romeo's driver contract for the 1932 Grand Prix Monaco and Mille Miglia (issued in 2 languages, Italian and German).

 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top