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I'm loving my 82. It's the last year of having clean lines and the first year of the Bosch EFI. Average crank time is about .5 seconds before she fires and purrs like a kitten whether it's 40 degrees or 90 degrees.

However.

It's got big ugly black bumpers. The EFI detracts some from overall "alfa character" as well as limits cam choice and while i don't need a 200hp spider, i'd sure like 50 more ponies over my current est 100.

So. If God forbid something horrific happened to your spider and you were back to square one... What year would be your first choice?
 

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You really don't want a 135mph spider, trust me on this one. I regret getting rid of my 85 spider that really had some things going for it over the better looking 73.

I think an 82 is just fine! Keep it stock and do a few repairs now and then. I also had a gtv6, and I suggest the spider is the one to keep, though many may disagree.
 

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Grasshopper....Tazio say one of each. When searching for that arachnid companion one must choose her like you would your female companion...

A duetto for looks, value, and collectability....might throw a 1750 Kamm in there as well....this is the trailer queen.......she is hot and smart enough to not let you get passed first base.

A series 2 Kamm....any year...retrofitted with the stainless bumpers for racing.....this one sitting on hoosiers......the athletic tom boy in reality who likes to play hard with the boys and will let you go all the way!

A series 3 for a daily driver.....she is probably a little rough but she gets me there....This is the party gal. She is probably not the best looking of the bunch but she'll please you with a home run or two!

A series 4 for modern collectable and nice weekend cruiser......this one is really nice and great for the occasional Alfa event...a real looker this prom queen is but she is packing some pounds.....just imagine how hot she'd be if she was lighter. :D:D:D

Now if you are asking which is best to modify for performance....well what you have is. A kamm tail spider....retrofitted with the stainless bumpers is a sharp looking car and won't leave you with a bunch of regret down the road for doing some modifications beneath the hood. They are lighter than the ones that followed. You can get rid of whatever injection/carbs are on there and do whatever you want. You'll need to make changes anyway to meet that goal.

Best Regards,
John M
 

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John - that was brilliant piece of literary genius.

I say series 2 spiders RULE...although round tails sure look sweet!

It is difficult to pick just one....
 

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I'm loving my 82. It's the last year of having clean lines and the first year of the Bosch EFI. Average crank time is about .5 seconds before she fires and purrs like a kitten whether it's 40 degrees or 90 degrees.

So. If God forbid something horrific happened to your spider and you were back to square one... What year would be your first choice?
I suppose the one (or more, gents) you got, we all like our Spider.
Mine, 1750Veloce 1970 Kamm, euro specs - she is old, sporty and reliable (touch wood).
Erik
 

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I've had 3 spiders, and all have had their charms.

My first was a Silver '87 Quad. I loved the bordello interior, the hardtop and ice-cold A/C (yes, it's possible. Don't let anyone tell you the Spider A/C isn't effective) let me drive it year-round, and the handling was honest and direct. That was the car that taught me how to double-clutch, and the meaning of drop-throttle oversteer. Too heavy and slow, though, by any measure, and it was a bit pricy to maintain with the 100+ mile a day commute I had at the time. I still think S3s are the best "everyday" Alfa.

Next was my '74, purchased as a shabby driver and now in pretty nice shape. I don't like to think about how much I've put into it - paint, wheels, tires, full engine rebuild, clutch, Weber conversion, some suspension work (with more to do), some interior cleanup (with more to do), new driver's side floor, and a fairly long laundry list of other minor things to do. This is the "Real Italian Sports Car" of the bunch. I might overdid it a bit with the engine work, but she rocks and rolls, makes all the right moves, and sounds unbelievable doing it. More high maintenance than the '87, for sure, but worth it.

The '81 was a throw in with another car deal. Dell-orto carb conversion, and a nice (if a bit shabby) driver. I owned this at the same time as the '74, and the personalities are very different. The 4.10 rear end and less ferociously built motor made it a much more sedate cruiser. Even though this was the "bad" year for Spiders - due to the Spica more than anything else - driving that car reminded me of the basic goodness of the Spider platform. Bottom line, I don't think you can go wrong with any of these cars. Just take care of yours, and appreciate it for what it is.

-Jason
 

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I wouldn't care....it only had to be a spider....:D:D:D
 

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My preference is for the series 2 cars, 1750 for revs, 2000 for a bit more grunt, and for me they perfected the shape in those years.

kinetics
 

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I'd vote for the 101 Giulia Spider. Some years ago Road & Track rated the Giulia Spider as one of the ten greatest sports cars of all time.
 

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The comments here are very accurate!

John M hit the nail on the head regarding which are best. Their is a Spider for everyone, it really depends on what you are looking for in a Sports car.

My list?

For a collector and Sunday driver? - Any Roundtail

For a restoration and future show car? - a 1971 1750

For a fast street and track car? - any Series 2A (Chrome Bumpers)

For a budget conscious buyer? - Series 2B (Rubber Bumpers - not 80 or 81)

For a daily driver? - Series 3 (except 1982 and 1990 because of their transitional natures, these are more collectible)

For a nice cruiser with all the trimmings? - a Series 4

For your significant other, Mom, Sister or Daughter (if she is not sports car friendly) - a Series 4 automatic

They are all good and I would be happy to own any of them.
 

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I'm loving my 82. It's the last year of having clean lines and the first year of the Bosch EFI. Average crank time is about .5 seconds before she fires and purrs like a kitten whether it's 40 degrees or 90 degrees.

However.

It's got big ugly black bumpers. The EFI detracts some from overall "alfa character" as well as limits cam choice and while i don't need a 200hp spider, i'd sure like 50 more ponies over my current est 100.

So. If God forbid something horrific happened to your spider and you were back to square one... What year would be your first choice?
The one in your garage.

Here's mine:
 

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The most desirable spider is...

...the one you don't currently own.
 

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The one in your garage.

Here's mine:
Why didn't you bring that puppy to the convention? Or did you and I missed it?

Best Regards,
John M
 

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Why didn't you bring that puppy to the convention? Or did you and I missed it?

Best Regards,
John M
This year, I had multiple people attending, and also my daughter was driving in the Autocross. Hence the Class H dominating <grin> Berlina!

I'm hoping to bring the Spider to Chicago next year for a certain Spider challenge, although if that doesn't happen I heard rumor there may be a Berlina challenge!

bs
 

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...
So. If God forbid something horrific happened to your spider and you were back to square one... What year would be your first choice?
I know I could have answered the question without having to prove it, but I guess there is no doubt, since I went through this already. :rolleyes: A few years back I spun out my ’84 Spider while driving in an ice storm. The very next day I created a spread sheet which I titled “The Perfect ‘84”. :D It took me 18 months to source everything :eek: and only after I had everything we started the work, and 9 months later, “Raquel” was on the road. :) In the meantime, I drove my ’74 and ’87 Spiders. I love them both, and proof of that is that every year I say I need to downsize and sell the ’87, but can never bring myself to do so. In fact I like all Spiders, and enjoy looking at the different flavors and personal touches that owners bestow on their pride and joy. When I see something unusual I get excited and look it over like a little kid seeing one for the very first time.

Without a doubt however, the black and brown ’84 is where my most desirable Spider starts. Here’s why. It has a nice balance of vintage cosmetics and modern mechanics, and it is a comfortable car. Its interior has the classic deep wood steering wheel and the dual pod set-up (tachometer and speedometer) in front of the driver, with the three gauges (fuel, oil, temperature) in the upper center dash. That is vintage, classic Alfa, to a tee. Then, the leather seats add a level of luxury, but at the same time they are not too large, retaining a sports car look. The loop carpet, with its’ unique speckled pattern, add to its’ distinction. It has nice vintage features like interior chrome handles, and imitation wood and chrome strips on the rear deck, with four chrome door handles for attaching luggage straps. At the same time, it has power windows, power remote mirrors, a digital clock, and a great working A/C. (A/Cs were a factory option, but many Spiders came with them.) The A/C vents are nicely positioned on either extreme of the upper dash, and also on either side of the middle console. Then, there’s the interior light perfectly positioned overhead in the rearview mirror, making it very functional, particularly for a convertible vehicle. Another cool feature is the Campagnolo “Daytona” (5-star) wheels, which weigh only 12 lbs. each! Last, in ’84 the Italian factory only made one version of the Spider: the Spider Veloce. It’s a great model in its own right.

I say that this is where my most desirable Spider starts, because I decide a long time ago what was my definition of the “ultimate Spider”. For me, there are three criteria: it must be a concours level car, it must have significant performance, and it must be driven. The cosmetic department is pretty clear: it’s a true labor of love to keep a car that is used in great condition. The only change I did to mine was to fit her with a Quadrifoglio spoiler kit. (I happen to think that the Quad shape has the edge over all other shapes, but still prefer the interior of the earlier series cars.) As an added bonus, this allows me to drive the car without worrying too much about the original lower panels. I only remove the spoilers if the car is to be shown at the national convention concours. The next topic is my favorite: performance. The stock set-up is adequate, but not great, so my upgrades where done over many years, but today they add up to a very capable Spider. Here’s what has been done, taking into account period correct and Alfa factory options: upper adjustable control arms, Ward and Deane springs, chassis stiffener, polyurethane bushings throughout (including motor mounts), heavier rear sway bar, slotted cross drilled rotors, steel braided brake lines, performance brake MC, engine cooling plate, engine windage tray, trap doors in the oil pan, engine oil cooler (in the correct factory option position), Borgo 10:1 pistons, headers (as spec’d by the Factory Performance Catalog), ported and polished head (Sperry Stage V), 12 mm C&B camshafts, and free flow cat.

Finally, this Spider is driven. I average about 8k mi. per year, and while I am trying to reduce that, it’s been a loosing battle for years. A memorable drive for me will always be this past August’s AROC convention in Detroit. My wife accompanied me for the first time, and it was also the first time that “Raquel” pulled its newly fitted 4 foot trailer with the racing wheel/tires, jack, tools, and the legal roll bar. That was a real long time dream that came true, and it was possible because of the great guidance and support that the AROC members have always given me. :)

Best regards,
 

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If I lost my car, I'd be happy with another '71. It's a unique year. I have no experience with the two-liter, but I'm enjoying the 1750, I like the stainless bumpers and the bumper-mounted tag lights in back. I like the rather Spartan interior; it feels like an extension of the exterior, in that it seems designed with the knowledge that the top will be down often and it very well might get wet inside, so rubber mats and vinyl upholstery are required. I even like the quirky metal loop Klippan seat belts, although I'd love to get a three-point version. The car really suits me. One day I'll get the body work done right and maybe go back to the original color (the PO painted it silver over the original green).
 

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Farace,

Someways I still regret selling my 71 spider, I always thought that the seatbelt loop (Klippan) was cool :D

I agree, rain what rain, rubber mat and vinyl seats, just wipe it up.

The roudtail has leather and carpet, I refer to it as my instant gratification car, I bought it mostly finished.

But I would find it hard to choose between the 1969 & the 1971.

I guess I agree with some of the others, they are 2 different cars, with a common background, and thats one of the things thats really great about all of them.

George
 

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I'll start by saying I didn't want an Alfa at all, let alone a Spider. I had just got rid of a 1965 Mustang fastback and wanted something more challenging, a real car. I was looking at all the standard British classic tin - E-Types & Astons, and considered Austin Healeys and Sunbeam Tigers, but I saw a 1969 Roundtail Spider 1750 Veloce in a car show room and was immediately taken with its looks and impressed with the technical specification. The test drive pretty much sold it there and then.

I didn't buy that particular car but I investigated the whole Spider range and decided that the 1750 Roundtail had it all for me. Rare and exotic but also affordable compared to the others marques I was contemplating. It was stylish and classy, before the abrupt, if necessary, surgery of the Kamn tail. And in European form had a purity that was lost in the US, and later, variants with fuel injection, lack of headlamp cowls and those curious bumpers.

Look what you get for a 60's car: all alloy twin cam engine, 5 speed gearbox, all round disc brakes, wishbone front suspension and complex geometry rear suspension (albeit using a solid rear axle). None of which changed in the life of the car - why not pick the best looking one?

I've since updated my 1968 Spider with better suspension and will be looking to give the engine some attention in the future. The later cars may be somewhat more drivable and have modern conveniences but you can't beat taking 10 minutes fine tuning a pair of Weber DCOEs and then spending an hour or so testing the results.

I'll think I'll be keeping it for a while yet.
 
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