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I have the blts removed except for the two bolts on the rear passenger side corner. Tey appear to be blocked by the CV joint. Is there away to get to them without removing the CV joint? Terry
 

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I have the blts removed except for the two bolts on the rear passenger side corner. Tey appear to be blocked by the CV joint. Is there away to get to them without removing the CV joint? Terry
Not likely - unless you have some very unusual tools! Need to detach passenger side half shaft and then pull intermediate shaft out to get better access. But before that drain tranny fluid first.
 

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Wonder if it is possible to loosen the axle mount attached to block and see if there would be enough movement to get to the two bolts. Terry
 

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Perhaps! But I don't think the intermediate shaft can be moved sideway much since it goes straight in the differential for at least a couple of inches. Also, you need to figure out how to support the engine - well, sooner or later you have to do that because you cannot put anything under the oil pan (you'll either have to jack up the engine at the crank pulley or use a hoist from the top).

I'd say bite the bullet and take out the intermediate shaft. It is not that difficult to do. You'll MOST likely need to do that anyway when you try to take the oil pan down. Believe me, it'll be another fun puzzle :)! The oil pump pickup tube will be there to prevent dropping the oil pan easily :mad:! Well, some people goes in there and detach the pick up tube but that's not easy IMO. Now, the good news is you DON'T have to do that :):):)! What you need to do is to raise the engine (at the crank pulley side) a couple of inches and perhaps lower the subframe a little. This will allow you to SHIFT and ROTATE the oil pan. The oil pan will clear and come down AFTER you rotate it for, say, about 270 degrees.
 

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Wonder if it is possible to loosen the axle mount attached to block and see if there would be enough movement to get to the two bolts. Terry
You can loosen the CV joint(no need to remove it unless you feel the need), move it to the side, remove 3 bolts holding intermediate shaft in and slide shaft out of transmission (some fluid will leak), then you can move intermediate shaft support and mount off to access bolts . Intermediate shaft is not hard to remove. IMO remove as much as possible to make the job easier.
 

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Digging up this old thread to ask some follow-up questions... Any idea if the later (shallow) oil pan is any easier (or more difficult) to remove? Perhaps it might be possible to remove without lifting the engine and/or dropping the subframe?

I'd like to be prepared to do a junkyard removal should I ever come across a later one. And yes, I realize I'd also need to get the oil pickup and front cover, and so removal of the crank pulley would be part of the process.
 

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Process pretty much the same as front of pan still the same and still close to subframe side rail.
 

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Okay, thanks Steve. Any thoughts on possible "junkyard terrorist" tactics that might make the job quicker/easier? I submit as an example... :D
Doesn't like anything has been done to make job any easier than if whole engine was there.
 

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Sorry, I wasn't clear Steve. That was an example of a "junkyard terrorist tactic" - in that case, making the rear head much more easily removable. Obviously not a strategy which can be used on a car you intend to drive again!
You were clear but to get pan and front cover off that engine requires pretty much the same thing as doing it regular way.

If chassis up on stands already disconnect outer tie rod end, remove three lower ball joint bolts, four lower strut bolts, three intermediate axle bearing bolts in rear engine mount, disconnect or cut brake hose, disconnect ABS cable inner fender area (cut if you must). Pull out brake caliper, rotor, axle spindle, outer axle assembly with IM axle attached to outer axle.

Remove nuts off front and rear engine mounts. Jack up engine under pan then find a way with hoist or something under water pump pulley etc to hold engine up.

Now to get front pulley nut off you will need to lock something in crankshaft journal if you don't have hi torque battery powered impact gun with 41mm (1 5/8") socket.

Remove a/c compressor and front engine mount bracket to access front pan bolts.

May have to remove lower flywheel cover to get to rear pan bolts can't remember. Also move have to remove rear engine mount bracket to get to two back bolts.

Once you get pan bolts out lower pan and if needed disconnect oil pick up tube from oil pump (2 allen head on pump and two on main bearing cap).
 

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That picture made me smile. I once left a junkyard 164 looking almost exactly the same, and had a wheelbarrow full of parts for a very reasonable sum.

Make sure, before you start going through the effort, to inspect the oil pan for damage. Many times, during the junkyard "prep" process, a hole is punched through the pan to drain the oil, rather than just undoing a plug. Probability of a broken/cracked pan from forklift use is also high.

With a dissassembled engine bay like this, it may be easier to bring a helper, disconnect the struts, remove the steering shaft from the rack, remove the few bolts holding the subframe on, then drop (let gravity do its thing) the whole subframe and engine. With care, you could drag the whole thing from under the car with a helper, flip the thing upside down, and work on the pan from above. Much more enjoyable than crawling around under a junkyard car in the mud.
 

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Jack up engine under pan then find a way with hoist or something under water pump pulley etc to hold engine up.
This was the step I was concerned about as they typically remove the jacks before putting the cars out in the yard and the hoists, if available, are time consuming to wheel out.

Alternate strategy? Block the transmission up, disconnect the struts and three mounts, and drop the sub-frame. The dog-bone mount would hold it up on the other side so it's just sorta hanging in the wind.
 

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Now to get front pulley nut off you will need to lock something in crankshaft journal if you don't have hi torque battery powered impact gun with 41mm (1 5/8") socket.
I do have a cordless Dewalt impact gun, but it's limited to ~300 lb/ft, and often that's not enough for something like this. What has worked better for me is stuffing a clipped ignition lead (in lieu of rope) down one of the cylinders and then use my breaker bar to free the nut.
 

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Make sure, before you start going through the effort, to inspect the oil pan for damage. Many times, during the junkyard "prep" process, a hole is punched through the pan to drain the oil, rather than just undoing a plug. Probability of a broken/cracked pan from forklift use is also high.
Good point - certainly this would be step 1. Typically it's the automatic transmissions where they pierce the pans to drain them. Hopefully they wouldn't even try that with a cast AL pan!

With a dissassembled engine bay like this, it may be easier to bring a helper, disconnect the struts, remove the steering shaft from the rack, remove the few bolts holding the subframe on, then drop (let gravity do its thing) the whole subframe and engine.
That does seem to be the most common method of pulling a FWD engine in the junkyard, as evidenced by the discarded sub-frames you often find laying around. As you suggest, it's probably only viable if you bring a friend to the dance. :D
 

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My 7-year bump on this thread... Wondering if the oil pan on the 24V engines is exactly the same as the late 12V. i.e. Could I remove an oil pan from a 24V engine and bolt it onto an early 12V engine?
 

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You need a shorter oil pump pick up tube and a later front cover around crank shaft for bolt pattern to match later pan. I posted pictures in an old thread on BB showing the differences. I may even have a good spare early pan. If you are a purist the oil level sensors are different lengths, too.
 
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