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I completed a head gasket replacement a few weeks ago to fix leaking oil and coolant. But I still have a small oil leak which is dripping from around the bottom of the A/C compressor; I get a puddle about the size of a few quarters overnight. I did a hot torque on the cylinder head, but haven't done the followup cold retorque yet since I haven't driven 1000 miles.

In trying to find the source of the leak, I sprayed everywhere I could reach with purple power cleaner and rinsed it off. After a week of driving, I noticed the top of the sump is coated with fresh oil and there is oil coating the general area of the pictures below. The lower radiator hose is also coated with oil.

I verified the OVS hoses are connected. Where should I be looking for the source of the leak?
 

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Front crank pulley seal? Not unusual.
 

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I think you got that one right Mr. Raymond. Don't wait a 1000 miles do the retorque --- after you have had it to running temp then wait till it is stone motherless cold (next day) I've not had a fail 3 heads 2 different motors. Hope this helps
 

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I agree with Gordon. Looks like front crank seal to me.

As for oil leaks, I have battled a few myself.

Absolutely invaluable is the leak detector kit I bought at my local parts place.

Dye for your oil and a UV light.

This will show you where the leak is coming from and as importantly, where its not coming from quickly.

Wouldnt look for the source of an oil leak without it.

BTW, if it is the front crank seal, be sure to put a lick of oil around the part of the seal that touches the crank or you will be changing it out again in a month or two.

Good luck,

Vin
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks everyone. I will do the cold retorque as suggested and check the crankshaft seal. The leak detector kit sounds pretty cool.
 

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retorque --- after you have had it to running temp then wait till it is stone motherless cold (next day)
There are some experienced engine builders on the board that recommend hot re-torque.
 

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You might want to check the right front bolt ( facing the engine) that goes up through the timing cover into the head. These can drip oil if no sealed. Good luck.
 

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I recently got the uv light and dye and I've got to say it's the best thing since sliced bresd. For real! I would think if it was the front seal it would have been leaking before the headgasket repair. If it's leaking around the headgasket a prime suspect is usually a crushed o ring or a piece of debris on the new gasket. If everything wasn't cleaned and cleaned again and I'm not saying it wasn't that could be it.
 

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I completed a head gasket replacement a few weeks ago to fix leaking oil and coolant. But I still have a small oil leak which is dripping from around the bottom of the A/C compressor; I get a puddle about the size of a few quarters overnight. I did a hot torque on the cylinder head, but haven't done the followup cold retorque yet since I haven't driven 1000 miles.

In trying to find the source of the leak, I sprayed everywhere I could reach with purple power cleaner and rinsed it off. After a week of driving, I noticed the top of the sump is coated with fresh oil and there is oil coating the general area of the pictures below. The lower radiator hose is also coated with oil.

I verified the OVS hoses are connected. Where should I be looking for the source of the leak?
conventional wisdom is that you re torque cast iron heads hot and aluminum heads cold. the presumption is that since you you did the initial torque sequence cold . then what you are trying to do is reclaim the lost preload as the gasket seats. because al heads have a high rate of thermal expansion, the logic is that the preload HOT is increased anyway so when you try to retorque hot, what you get is a system telling you everything is ok because the torque number is already abnormally high because the head is effectively taller than it was cold, but as soon as it cools off its back to being " loose" . these motors are especially susceptable to hg problems because of the sleeves being iron and the oring underneith and the thick head gaskets etc etc and when richard says use bigger numbers, he is absolutely correct... i would do them cold immediatly after first running/ cooling off cycle and then i would do it a couple more times after i ran it pretty hard until i pulled it up to the final higher number richard suggests
( and that i use) without any further give. i would suggest that retorquing hot is simply not correct procedure for an al head if the object of the excercise is to get the studs prealoaded correctly for a fully seated and compressed gasket. doing it hot is not going to achieve that unless you have some derived number tha allows for the dimensionally different head...
 

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As for the leaking oil, IRC there is an O-ring for the distributor. And there is a right way (& thus wrong) way to install that O-ring. And I don't recall the right way - O-ring into block first then distributor or O-ring onto distributor then together into block...?
 

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BTW, if it is the front crank seal, be sure to put a lick of oil around the part of the seal that touches the crank or you will be changing it out again in a month or two.

Good luck,

Vin
Right- soooooo important- I learned the hard way years ago. Also aplies to camshaft seals, although other cars- just a tip.
 

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My procedure passed down from those I consider experts is the firsr crank to be done with the radiator cap loose, drive the car, get it heat soaked and re torque hot. I've done quite a few and they are always a bit loose. Then after 20 or so miles re torque cold. Never had one fail, knock on wood. I was thinking of the oil gallery O rings. I really couldn't get oriented with the photos.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just to finish out the thread, I found significant oil buildup around the base of the distributor and around the crankshaft front seal. Time to learn a few more repairs.

I replaced the distributor o ring using Vintre's guidance to place the o ring in the housing before sliding the distributor on it. I didn't use any sealant. It was very quick to replace.

For the crankshaft nut, I removed the radiator and borrowed a 36 mm socket from Autozone. I had to remove the A/C pulley to get to the crankshaft nut and I removed the radiator fan to make more room. I used a mirror to verify I did not have a lock washer on the nut. Later when I got the nut off, I saw there is a lock washer, but someone broke off the locking flap. I decided to use the starter bump trick to take off the nut. I have a 1/2 inch impact wrench, but I would have to remove the A/C condenser to make enough room for it.

I disconnected the wire to the coil and removed the fuel pump fuse. Then I braced a breaker bar against the ground on the driver side and attached it to the socket on the crankshaft nut. I had my daughter bump the starter about 10 times with no luck. I took off the socket and used a mirror to look at the nut. It was missing!!! I looked in the socket and it was there. It probably came off on the first starter bump

My crankshaft pulley shaft had some very shallow grooves so I installed a Speedi Sleeve that I read about on the forum. I removed the crankshaft seal using a seal removal tool I got from Amazon. It was tough since there isn't much room to use the tool with the A/C condenser in the way. I tried using a long screwdriver, but again the A/C condenser was in the way.

I inserted the seal using a piece of plywood with a hole cut out for the crankshaft and tightened it with the crankshaft washer and nut. Thanks for Vintre for documenting this trick.

While I had everything apart, I used degreaser and pressure washed all the oil buildup. Hopefully I took care of the oil leaks, but if not I should be able to see the source. I'm seriously thinking of getting a UV oil leak detector kit.

Thanks to all the folks who posted their experiences with removing crankshaft nuts and seals. I'm amazed how generous folks are with their time to show us newbies how to do our own repairs.
 

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Thanks for the update. Hopefully it will be a success.

Another couple of tips for when you are searching for the sources of oil leaks. 1) talcum powder. Once the engine is clean, dust some talcum powder around any suspect areas. That can help reveal where the oil might be leaking. B) a piece of clean white paper. Hold it near suspect areas. (be careful of moving parts like fan belts & fan blades!) It can reveal the very fine spray of oily mists that otherwise are hard to see.
 

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Glad you got it sorted.

Also, happy you didnt use the sealant. If I had to go back, I wouldnt have used sealant there. I will go back and revise my thread for future users.

I have a bit of an issue with oil leaks! :helpsmilie::p

I can not recommend the UV leak kit enough. Its around $30 but really invaluable to me when looking for leaks. Im no pro, so I need all the help I can get.

Congrats again.

Vin
 
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