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Discussion Starter #1
Last night, curious to see if there were any new photos or stories about my favorite Alfa, I entered “Alfa Romeo 1900C SS” in to my search engine and found a very strange photo. At first I wondered if it might be my car, although I knew it was very low probability. My car had Giulietta “eyebrows” installed very early in its life, following a respray that was likely necessitated by front end damage. I have photos of my car with that Giulietta trim over the front air intakes, and have never seen another 1900 with that trim. It seems impossible that Touring would have ever built a Tipo IV Super Sprint with that trim, but what’s more curious is the grill inside the intakes.

Does anyone know this car? I found it on Supercars.net, but the photo is fairly widely distributed on the internet.

Thoughts?
1676744


-tj
 

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Looks pretty familiar to me, except for the strange side marker lights. I wonder how many gray-white ones were made? Is that the Alfa factory in the background?
 

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The building in the background seems to be the Alfa Romeo office building that is now part of the shopping center in Arese (not the building with the museum). This would date the picture to quite a bit later than 1962.

 

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Alfa Romeo 2000 Touring Spider from January 1959
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Looks pretty familiar to me, except for the strange side marker lights. I wonder how many gray-white ones were made? Is that the Alfa factory in the background?
The side marker lights are from a European model AR 2000 Touring Spider. Many European countries demand these days side marker lights to make (keep) your car road legal. The very same goes for a side mirror on the driver side. Neither 1900's nor 2000 models had side mirrors originally (to the best of my knowledge).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here’s a photo of my car in New York in 1964. Thanks to John DeBoer, I know that the last recorded Italian owner of my car was in 1959. Coincidentally, that owner, Piero Predelli, lived in Milan, and the car was registered there.

If it were not for the very strange “inserts” in the intakes (side grills) and the fact that the rocker trim strip seems to be thicker than what I believe to be the “factory part” (and indeed the strips that came with my car) I’d wager rather strongly that this is indeed 10321. It just seems unlikely that two white Tipo IVs would end up looking so similar.

Items that support the argument that this car is indeed 10321:

-Giulietta “eyebrows” installed over air intakes
-2000 style marker lights
-color
-Lucas front marker/turn signal lights (I don’t believe they’re original but my car came with this style of light)
-timing (my car came to North America after 1959 and before 1964) The photo seems to be post 1962
-Milanese based owner which could coincide with the timing of the photo.

Items that support the argument that this car is NOT 10321
-the inserts in the air intakes seem to mean that no “center wing” was present. My car’s intakes had that center wing.
-the thickness of the rocker trim strip


1676763


-tj
 

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Alfa Romeo 2000 Touring Spider from January 1959
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There is also the lacking inside mirror, the black versus wooden Nardi steering wheel and the antenna...... Ruedi wrote in a post a few months ago that Touring produced Alfa Romeo 2000 Spiders in batches. In contrast to the 2000, which was more 'factory produced', the 1900 CSS was still hand-made according to Touring's supperleggara production method. Still, is it possible that Touring produced also 1900 in badges and that one (some?) of the badges had the Giulietta eyebrows?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I don't see, definitively that the car is lacking an inside mirror or that the steering wheel is the black plastic version. I did notice the antenna of course, and figured that it could have been installed by the new North American owner.

As to your second point, I suppose anything is possible but from a design perspective it seems unlikely to me as the Giulietta eyebrows look horrible on the shape. And those "inserts" are the most peculiar thing I've ever seen.

-tj


There is also the lacking inside mirror, the black versus wooden Nardi steering wheel and the antenna...... Ruedi wrote in a post a few months ago that Touring produced Alfa Romeo 2000 Spiders in batches. In contrast to the 2000, which was more 'factory produced', the 1900 CSS was still hand-made according to Touring's supperleggara production method. Still, is it possible that Touring produced also 1900 in badges and that one (some?) of the badges had the Giulietta eyebrows?
 

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Still, is it possible that Touring produced also 1900 in badges and that one (some?) of the badges had the Giulietta eyebrows?
I don't have Giovanni Bianchi Anderloni's "Carrozzeria Touring" book handy. I vaguely recall he may have described 1900 production as being up to a dozen car bodies being built concurrently.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I don't doubt this at all, but I still don't believe that Touring would have installed the Giulietta eyebrows. I've sent an email to Giovanni to ask for his opinion on the matter and will share what I learn.

-tj

I don't have Giovanni Bianchi Anderloni's "Carrozzeria Touring" book handy. I vaguely recall he may have described 1900 production as being up to a dozen car bodies being built concurrently.
 

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The picture from Supercars for sure ran a bell, and I confirm that the car in question, at the same spot but under another angle, is illustrated p. 89 in the book Museo Storico Alfa Romeo, edited by Alfa in 1981.

The picture is thus in the Alfa archive, as the location suggests, and many other cars from the museum were photographed in a very similar style either at the exact same spot (2600 De Luxe p. 97) or in the neighborhood. This suggests that the car is/was either at the museum, or with a very close collector. That set of pictures predates the 1981 book date by some years, I think they were published on other Alfa prints, I would say they should be around the opening of the museum, 1976. It could be checked further if the car can be spotted on pictures of the museum collection back in the 70/80s.

The actual conditions of the car on the pictures fit an updated car that has had some use, and some trim may have been replaced by unoriginal items over time. The Giulietta (or 2000 Touring) indicators are probably an update from 1959, when the new road code mandated turning lights.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you for this and the previous information. With this, as well as other input we can safely say that this car is not 10321. Peter Marshall has said, with some authority, that the car in the photo is actually 10092, which is one of two Tipo IVs at the Museo. The most interesting detail of this one being the trim that completely encircles the intakes, a feature I think I’ve only seen on one other, and that is the black and white publicity photo from Alfa. I wonder if the car in that photo is actually the white one above. The 10092 seems to indicate it’s a fairly early Tipo IV.


-tj


The technical office building seen in the background was finished in 1974, so that the picture can be dated between 1974 and 1980 maximum.
 
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