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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Bride bought me a bubble spa to ease my aching body after working on 164's, etc...

But darn heater never worked so ready for warranty caper BUT they want me to fund the to and from shipping to UT. At 80# that PO's me a bunch.

Today I pulled control unit out of spa and found p**s poor assembly and QA.

Heater ground wire attaching screw/nut loose and thermocouple mounting screws loose on heater element, too.

Tightened loose screws and rigged up a test cell in sun room of control unit outside of bladder with a plastic storage container to flow water in and out of unit pump and heater and got temp of water to rise to 104F.

Reassembled spa now need to move back to sun room, fill and double check heater.

I hope it works good because I have to pull tranny and do clutch and TO bearing change on my Ranger PU the parts hauler and I am sure my body will ache from that caper.

I hate it when you get a bad item and then have to pay to get warranty to work.
 

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At the same time there is a certain satisfaction in actually getting on and fixing something rather than fighting to get someone else to fix it. Well done. Kinda fits the context of that oil-change-rant thread, doesn't it...

I used to enjoy opening things without breaking those 'warranty void if removed' stickers. Actually I've always enjoyed taking things apart even when they are working, and trying to make them better...

I talked myself out of this with my brand-new Carello projector headlights (HID/Xenon) I got for my 156. I was going to take them apart before even trying them, but I reasoned that I am old and sensible now, they cost a four-figure sum, and there was no need to find out what was inside. After fitting the headlights some months later, I have found that one lens is misty and the other light has some loose optics somewhere - shimmers over bumps - see, I should have taken them apart after all. Now I have to remove the bumper again to get them out...

I suppose the rule I live by is, never buy anything that you wouldn't want to take apart ;)

-Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #5
At the same time there is a certain satisfaction in actually getting on and fixing something rather than fighting to get someone else to fix it. Well done. Kinda fits the context of that oil-change-rant thread, doesn't it...

I used to enjoy opening things without breaking those 'warranty void if removed' stickers. Actually I've always enjoyed taking things apart even when they are working, and trying to make them better...

-Alex
I tried that once as a kid on my bicycle and ended up with a free spinning pedal and chain but no transfer of power to rear wheel. Learned real quick all those clutch washers in rear hub needed to go back in a very special order.

Unwritten mental notes not always good enough. Actual written notes, pictures, tech manuals and tags, etc., very helpful.
 

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I tried that once as a kid on my bicycle and ended up with a free spinning pedal and chain but no transfer of power to rear wheel. Learned real quick all those clutch washers in rear hub needed to go back in a very special order.

Unwritten mental notes not always good enough. Actual written notes, pictures, tech manuals and tags, etc., very helpful.
Oh yes. When I was 16 I took apart an automatic transmission valve body with no prior information. Balls and springs went everywhere and it took another transmission disassembly before I could figure it out. Clutch pack was a similar story to your rear hub - it just didn't work until I'd tried assembling it a few different ways.

I remember as a 13-year-old trying to convince computer rental guy to lend me a third working Apple LaserWriter II so that I could get gear train and transfer wires installed correctly. Had started off with one dead printer and one working printer, then had two dead printers and needed a third. Rental guy was understandably not so keen but complied in the end and I got all three working. Financially very viable back then.

Alfa 164s are perhaps not so financially viable (now worth less than those laser printers were in 1992) but for me, the satisfaction of getting something working better is worth it.

I think my Mum possibly shaped who I am by her horrified reaction when I would always take things apart... walkman, R/C car, I was more interested by what was inside than in just using it as intended. If she hadn't reacted so strongly, I might not have bothered as a six-year-old and then where might I be today.

Now the ABS valve block is faulty in my Alfa 156... do I take it apart to try and fix it, or get another from a late-model car? I think probably the latter as this seems a rare fault (open circuit on solenoid inlet valve) and probably not fixable anyway - and besides, it is a safety device.

-Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have learned from some of my Mis-tooks. Thankfully far more than less. Still have alot to learn and probably will still make some more mistakes but that's the beauty of it - LEARNING.

Now you take the 164 everyday is a chance to learn something new and "exciting".
 

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Now you take the 164 everyday is a chance to learn something new and "exciting".
Might just learn to fix mine before the mechanic does. It's still in the shop and it's been about a month now. By the way, I did get the sparkplug wires I needed. I had a set made from other cables at a parts store, ones are a little longer than they should but they work. As I suspected that didn't fix it, #1 cylinder misfired and the new plugs soon got all covered in carbon, because it's running too rich. Co2 machine was broken so they couldn't tune the engine. Seems they've taken it to Alfa Romeo now.

Taking things apart? I love it. I once had this Kawasaki string trimmer with a faulty carburettor. The needle inside the constant level tank broke and I couldn't get a new carb for less than 75€. Solution: take a carb from a 50cc bike and fit it in the trimmer! It did drip some fuel to the ground, but it got so much torque the trimmer rolled up on the harness when I hit the throttle hard.

Of course my father didn't approve my work and said it was all nonsense. What to expect? :;)
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Hot tub sure makes me feel better after a manual labor day

Well, has been a bit since I fixed the hot tub heater but it sure works now. Not a fast heater but I finally filled it up last week directly from hot water heater about 6 times to get it full and keep the filter pump and heater on.

We have been using it nightly now and I can get it up to 102-104F so real toasty. Bubble machine part of it though injects ambient air to make bubbles so after about 15 minutes temp drops to 98F. Still pretty nice to soak and enjoy the bubbles.

I worked rotor tiller and hauled and unloaded compost and mulch for last three days so a hot tub comes in handy.

Oh I did drive my 164B to Men's bible study early this morning before switching over to truck and trailer work.
 

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Steve,

Just be careful with that inflatable spa because if something goes wrong there will be a heck of lot of water in your house.....glad to see you carried out the warranty repair yourself...done that before.....

At the same time there is a certain satisfaction in actually getting on and fixing something rather than fighting to get someone else to fix it.
Today I wasted great FL outdoors Alfa weather to install a new SEARS garage door opener which for some obscure reason comes with a ridiculous short three foot cord with 3 point plug on the end of it.
As if there will be an outlet somewhere on your garage rafters.....grrrrrrr.

Naturally the disclaimer in the instructions points at the local by-laws as to whether or not you need to wire directly or not.

It means one has to remove the cover, disconnect the short cable, pry out the inlet grommet to lead in the existing heavy duty grounded cable which of course does not fit easily.
Now I know why the SEARS Guy was trying to have me add the installation fee and insurance.


I told him my Wife would take care of everything.....
 

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It means one has to remove the cover, disconnect the short cable, pry out the inlet grommet to lead in the existing heavy duty grounded cable which of course does not fit easily.
Now I know why the SEARS Guy was trying to have me add the installation fee and insurance.
Next thing you know they'll be voiding your warranty because you opened up the cover and let out the "magic air" that keeps stuff like that from breaking down.

A socket on the ceiling is a great idea, I'm always weary of extension cords, both because they can be a electric but also a trip hazard. I'll put one in my garage and another on the cellar.
 
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