Alfa Romeo Forums banner

21 - 35 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,241 Posts
Congrats, Dirtycamel -- this looks like a good project.

You can get windshields in the USA at fairly reasonable prices from Pilkington Classics (give them a call to check availability -- it can take weeks to months until they have them in stock, probably depending on when or how often they can fill a container with orders from the factory in the UK).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
Adding more pictures. The crankshaft, sadly, is toast. And I found the rust I expected in the spare tire wheel well. Someone was creative and used a lid from a 55 gallon drum and welded it into the bottom, with some sheet metal tacked on the sides. I'll give them an A for creativity, but it's not exactly 1959 Alfa resto work.
 

Attachments

·
Push hard and live
Joined
·
8,932 Posts
Bob Fernald just told me about a shop in Tennessee that can often bring such a crank back via welding and chroming.

Write to Jim via "180out" to get connected to Bob.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,944 Posts
Bob Fernald just told me about a shop in Tennessee that can often bring such a crank back via welding and chroming.
If Taylor is here in California, a closer crankshaft specialist would be Sammy Hale in Novato. Hmm - a little web searching brings up a Yelp page saying that Hale's location at 16 Pamaron Way Ste G is closed; does that mean that the shop has relocated but is still open, or that Hale is no longer in business?

Jon Norman (510 525-9435) could recommend a northern California crankshaft specialist capable of working on Alfa 2000's.

I'm just trying to save Taylor some shipping expense; not trying to take business away from 180out's guy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
Yep, here in Sacramento, California. If there is anyone in the area, I would certainly welcome them to come by and take a look at the car and everything with it. The more information I can get, the better off I am.


Taylor
 

·
Push hard and live
Joined
·
8,932 Posts
Taylor,

I'm just over the hill in Carson City. Although I'm headed to Monterey in 13 days, I'll be overhead at about 10,000 feet.

As you move forward with your project, feel free to come over for a look at a complete car and one in process. It could happen I'll be over your way from time to time, but no plans at present.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
Taylor,

Now that you've got everything home and have had a good look at things I would strongly advise you to come up with how much you want to spend in total. Not how much you think things will cost piece by piece, but whats your "all in" budget. Even if you want to "just get the car running and driving, not restored" you're looking at a lot of dough at this point. I know, as my Spider is about to be awakened after a 40 year sleep and it was complete, pretty original and was rust free. All its needed was hydraulics and an engine rebuild (although its not on the road yet, so who knows if murphy is just around the corner). And it hasn't been cheap nor easy (sourcing things can be a pain, timewise and cost wise for even simple mechanical components). I'm not a dealer nor a flipper but a life long hobbyist that has dabbled across multiple marks, mostly from the late 50's and 60's. The mistake I've seen over and over is that a car arrives like yours and money starts to be spent on "obvious things" like reconditioning the crankshaft (or even sourcing a spare from somewhere), then other unrelated pieces...or heck, even just focused on things for your engine. Soon, you're into it for a couple of grand with very little to show and a whole bunch more to go.....as in tens of thou. Literally with these cars in the condition you find yours it jumps into those numbers pretty quick even if you're doing most of your own wrenching. There is ALOT to do with your car - from the pics virtually everything is going to need some serious attention (although your interior looks pretty good!). So, if you do jump in headfirst, and I'm not suggesting you don't, make sure your prepared to drop $20/30K and if your going for a nut/bolt restoration, double that. The good news is that this forum is very helpful offering knowledgeable advice, support and sometimes spares. These cars are pretty simple - most things bolt off/on in a pretty straightforward way. Best of luck
 

·
Push hard and live
Joined
·
8,932 Posts
I must politely disagree with Dan.

The car you show in your pictures will require $20k - $40k just to drive around, and not nearly restored.

The car is my thread needs much less than yours, and I'm expecting to spend $50k - $80k on a best-in-show restoration.

If you have rust in your sills, expect to spend at least $5k - $10k on just the metal work of the body. THEN paint. Chrome work? $5k - $10k. Engine. $8k. Interior $5k (minimum). Wheels and tires, $1,500. Top, $1,000. Paint $10k - $20k. Clutch $300-$500 Exhaust $1k - $2k. Rubber components $3k - 4k.

I described a scenario to a fellow Touring owner yesterday.

If you start with a $10k project, and put $30k into it, you end up with a $25k car. If you start with a $10k car, and put $80k into it, you end up with a $120k car.

Please don't be pound foolish, or worse, make the basic car worse by doing middling work that will have to be undone to redo it correctly.

Yes, it's your car. We'll all be happy to see you driving around in it. Just remember that a $20k budget may end up as a $10k loss, whereas a big budget should end up profitably.


Taylor,

Now that you've got everything home and have had a good look at things I would strongly advise you to come up with how much you want to spend in total. Not how much you think things will cost piece by piece, but whats your "all in" budget. Even if you want to "just get the car running and driving, not restored" you're looking at a lot of dough at this point. I know, as my Spider is about to be awakened after a 40 year sleep and it was complete, pretty original and was rust free. All its needed was hydraulics and an engine rebuild (although its not on the road yet, so who knows if murphy is just around the corner). And it hasn't been cheap nor easy (sourcing things can be a pain, timewise and cost wise for even simple mechanical components). I'm not a dealer nor a flipper but a life long hobbyist that has dabbled across multiple marks, mostly from the late 50's and 60's. The mistake I've seen over and over is that a car arrives like yours and money starts to be spent on "obvious things" like reconditioning the crankshaft (or even sourcing a spare from somewhere), then other unrelated pieces...or heck, even just focused on things for your engine. Soon, you're into it for a couple of grand with very little to show and a whole bunch more to go.....as in tens of thou. Literally with these cars in the condition you find yours it jumps into those numbers pretty quick even if you're doing most of your own wrenching. There is ALOT to do with your car - from the pics virtually everything is going to need some serious attention (although your interior looks pretty good!). So, if you do jump in headfirst, and I'm not suggesting you don't, make sure your prepared to drop $20/30K and if your going for a nut/bolt restoration, double that. The good news is that this forum is very helpful offering knowledgeable advice, support and sometimes spares. These cars are pretty simple - most things bolt off/on in a pretty straightforward way. Best of luck
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,944 Posts
make sure your prepared to drop $20/30K and if your going for a nut/bolt restoration, double that.
DPeterson3 said:
I must politely disagree with Dan.

The car you show in your pictures will require $20k - $40k just to drive around, and not nearly restored....I'm expecting to spend $50k - $80k on a best-in-show restoration.
Don: Is it Dan's numbers that you politely disagree with? Because it isn't obvious how your and Dan's estimates differ.

Dan and Don seem to agree on the budget for a "driver quality" restoration: "$20/30K" versus "$20k - $40k"

Dan says $40 - $60K for a "nut/bolt restoration"; it isn't 100% clear to me what a "nut/bolt restoration" is, but I'm guessing that it is something short of perfection.

Don says $50k - $80k for a "best-in-show restoration", which does sound like perfection, or something close. Those numbers make sense to me; no-holds-barred restorations are expensive, even assuming a lot of owner-supplied labor.

I liked Dan's advice to lay out a complete, realistic budget before addressing things like the rusted crankshaft. And if Taylor isn't prepared to spend at least that amount, he shouldn't spend anything.

And I liked Don's advice to decide upfront if this is a labor of love / just-for-fun endeavor, or if it needs to be a money-maker. If the latter, the investment will need to be much larger. I.e., it takes money to make money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
Honestly, at no time was this ever to be a money maker. Heck, I never really thought about restoring it to be honest. I've always been a Model A, 1939 Ford, 57 Chevy guy, as that was my dad, my uncle, my grandfather, etc. I remember sitting inside the engine compartment of my dad's 72 Chevy C-10 pick up with a 427, while he was swapping out a cam. I was 5 at the time. I just couldn't stand seeing a very cool car sitting in a barn wasting away, and, when given the chance, I brought it home. Even after unloading it from the trailer, getting it up on jack stands, looking at what is needed, I realized that this car, as much fun as it would be, is way above my abilities or budget. With a family of 5 kids, it's just not a practical project for me. I have to admit, the thought of polishing up the intake plenum and putting a pair of carbs on it is pretty sexy sounding, but it's just not reality for me. I think the best thing I can do is take a solid inventory of everything I have, take a ton of pictures and put it up for sale, so that someone that has some extra Alfa love to spread around can enjoy it.

To me, the car hobby is all about the love and feelings you have for the cars, the smile you get when you turn the key and you hear the engine warming up, the thumbs up you get when other people drive by and you KNOW they just wish they were the ones driving that car. So hopefully, I can find someone that can turn this project into what it deserves or should be. Then I can take the funds and get another 39 Ford and enjoy that with my family.

As I inventory things, I'll keep posting pictures of what I find. I have some questions on the carbs, as I believe I have two pairs of them, one seems to much older than the other pair. I'll try to get more pics up this week. Thanks for all the advice, I really appreciate the help.

Taylor
 

·
Push hard and live
Joined
·
8,932 Posts
Taylor,

Probably wise.

I spent at, or more, than $100k on my previous 102, and paid $14k for the project. I'm expecting less this time only because the car I just bought appears to be very nearly rust free. That assessment could change, much, much, for the worse.

The $100k car appeared quite good when I bought it. The rust in the sills was not nearly as bad as some I've seen. The bodywork and paint alone on that car was a little over $43,000.

So, when I suggest $50 - $80, the range would be for a good "driver", or full resto, depending upon where you start. Your car, in my opinion, is likely to be well over $50k for something you'd enjoy being seen in. Getting the engine to run, brakes to stop, and turn signals to flash doesn't really make a car a "driver" in my opinion.
 
21 - 35 of 35 Posts
Top