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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, first post so please be gentle with me!
I have just bought my first Alfa - a 1971 1750 GTV Mk2. It was a South African car that came back tot he UK about 12 months ago. I believe it was restored in South Africa a while back and when it was rebuilt they were not to careful with putting the wiring back together:frown2:

The list of things that does not work is longer than the list of things that does; the external lights all work but that is about it.....

There are no wires going to any of the warning lights and none of the switches on the centre console work. The horn is connected up to the brake test button! The fuel gauge is erratic (kind of expected), the temp gauge overeads (checked with pyrometer), and the Oil pressure gauge is also pretty random (locked solid at approx 3 bar no matter what temp or revs).

My main question is what is my best option repair the existing loom or buy a brand new one and start again? The car is a project anyway - I am planning on doing the Alfaholics Fast Road Suspension and replacing the brakes this winter.
Any advice gratefully recieved - I am thinking that if I spend my time fixing the existing wiring I will still have 40+ year old wiring but I don't know how possible it would be to put a new one in without major disassembly?
 

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Nice looking GTV! Welcome to the forum.

I entirely redid my loom reusing the existing wiring where it looked good, selectively upgrading certain wires and adding fuses where they really should have been. I replaced every single terminal and upgraded to a modern ATC style fuse box and added some relays. Not a terribly expensive thing to do and extremely rewarding. There are stellar wiring diagrams available from "papajam" on this forum. If your harness is in worse shape you can remake it in entirety, hop over to rossanos thread french blue restoration and look for his pics.

I did my work when the car was stripped to bare metal, but aside from some interior accessories, the wiring is not horribly buried. For a car like yours with some dodgy signs i think you'd be wise to really get in there and make it right.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks r-mm
I guess my quandrary is whether or not to purchase an entirely new loom like this:

Alfaholics Wiring Looms

Or just to start with what I have got and attempt to repair bit by bit?

Could you post a picture of your new fuse box, mine has 11 (I think there should only be 10?) individual blade fuses in the rough area of the fuses!

Cheers
Phil
 

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Hey Phil

I used a combination of negative bussed and individually fused blocks from this company https://www.bluesea.com/products/5025/ST_Blade_Fuse_Block_-_6_Circuits_with_Negative_Bus_and_Cover to replace the "bullet" style fuses. I have yet to mount the new fuse boxes to the chassis.

You can see my thread here: http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/gt-1963-1977/383129-anyone-update-their-fuse-block-2.html

Its a tough call on the pre-made harness. Alfaholics has a great reputation, fast shipping, I've bought from them many times but mostly spares not their own production items. You could easily spend that much or much more doing it yourself, with special tools, heat shrink tubing, wiring, connectors etc - the advantage being you have the chance to learn and to revise the factory's wiring if and where you please. You can still do that to a lesser extent with a pre-made loom, ie add headlight relays etc. I did mine "by hand" because I wanted a winter project and like this sort of work. If you just want to make it right, go for the Alfaholics.

Maybe if you post some pictures the crew here on AlfaBB could advise whether it looks like a total disaster or a reasonable fixer upper. But either way I'd plan on disassembling the car far enough that you have inimpeded access to the entirety of the loom. And take MILLIONS of pics along the way - always tricky to remember routing.
 

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Are you talking connectors missing, or connectors not connected, or connectors not connector to the correct component or some of each?

If more than a few wires have been snipped then a new loom is a real consideration. The appeal of the Alfaholic loam is that is no doubt made to factory spec.

They reason for assembling your own is that you get the correct length wires for the relays you will want to add to the headlamp and starter circuit. And you can uprate the wire in gauge and insulation (gxl wire is almost essential in the engine compartment). Having now finished three looms I can say that the cost of the Alfaholic looms is price competitive. As r-mm mentioned if you make your own loom there could be a outlay for the proper tools.

I've recently been using the Hella 8 way and 4 way axial ATC fuse blocks with great success in GTVs. r-mm first mentioned them in his above reference thread.

My objection to the Blue Sea Systems blocks that r-mm references is that they are large and bulky and I have never been able to find space under the dash to mount them. To use them also requires a complete redesign of the wire loom. I have used them on my water crafts however. I've also gone the route of adapting a fuse and relay block from a later model Alfa. But that again using it required a complete redesign of the wire loom.
 

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My objection to the blue Sea Systems blocks that r-mm references is that they are large and bulky and I have never been able to find space under the dash to mount them. I have used them on my water crafts however. I've also gone the route of adapting a fuse and relay block from later model Alfa. That required a complete redesign of the wire loom.
I should clarify that my car is not together, was not when I decided to use these fuse blocks and I'm sure I have some thinking to do in order to get them to fit. I know the engine bay box won't be a problem but the under dash box may require some creativity.

My only problem with the Hella boxes was figuring out how to do the ganged hot terminals. I didn't like the idea of adding a bus and I also didn't want to crimp multiple wires together like the factory did - seemed to be swimming upstream. The bluesea has a nice jumper system.

But we digress! Yes, the Alfaholics loom is almost certainly a good deal when you take everything into account. They have a great rep for their own production items but you might shoot max banks an email to get the details on his loom. "Max @ Alfaholics" max.banks [ at ] alfaholics [dot] com I'm sure he'd be happy to elaborate.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the inputs guys - all useful stuff. I am erring towards biting the bullet and buying a new loom. It will be a bit of a journey of discovery as I have not tried anything like this before.
When you say disassembling the car far enough to enable unimpeded access I assume we are talking about taking the dashboard out completely? Do you need to remove the front windscreen to enable this? Taking the dashboard out would also allow me to replace the currently non-existent heater ducts.
On a seperate but related note, what is the advantage of using the relays? Does it allow you to route power direct from the battery to high load items (headlights, starter motor?), and where is a good place to find a bit more info out on what people have done in the past?
 

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I think you're on the right track. Yes I'd presume removing the dash and no I don't think any glass has to come out.

You have it right on relays as well. Do a search on this forum for "headlight relay" and you'll find a lot of threads that show wiring and reasoning behind these decisions. If you can pull out the wiring diagram for a newer (not brand new, you'll probably have a heart attack looking at that) car you'll see how a modern vehicle protects its circuits and switches with relays.

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=headlight relays site:alfabb.com
 

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Definitely no glass needs to come out to remove the dash. There are a number of threads on this subject in the forum.

If you start with the premise that every questions about the new-to-you Alfa has probably been asked and answered on this forum over the last 12 years by the 500 or so active members then you are well on you way to an easy ownership. The relatively recently installed Google search has been helpful. But please do not hesitate to ask questions, or to relate your story about your car. Member's problems and the how they solve them are the backbone of this forum. And we always love to hear about potentially unique or unusual solutions the PO employed.

For instance, user r-mm has done a beautiful job chronicling his discoveries and ideas.

Back to the subject at hand: getting the loom to the rear tail lamps and whatnot requires that you remove a sill plate, just a few screws hold it in place. [edit: need to also remove the rear seat, they just lift out, and the quarter panel card, held in place by three or four screws; the loom tail to the rear routes over the rear wheel arch, tucked under the vinyl covering the arch.] The loom tail that goes forward to the engine compartment is run through a single hole in the bulk head. And at least on the GTV 2000's the wires running to the center console is route behind the heater.

When installing a new loom I start by making the connections to the fuse block, which is detached from the car then lay the loom's tails out, one to the back of the car, one to the front, two to the instrument cluster, ignition switch, glove box light, and one to the center console. It has always proven to be a straightforward operations.

Also it is worthwhile to pay attention to the routing of the loom; watch out for places where sheet metal edges or roughish surfaces can cut or wear away a wire's insulation. I, for instance, have seen copper wire exposed by the continual rubbing of an insulated wire that was pinched by the edge a sill plate. It took around five years and maybe eight thousand miles of driving but it did eventually happened. The owner's fuel gauge went wonky and we traced the problem to this fault. I mention this because what you wrote earlier makes me think that it is possible that the restorers of your car might not have been all that careful about installing the loom per the preferred factory routing.

Bob
 
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