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I recently purchased a 1987 Milano Gold at auction. It had been sitting since 2004. I got the rear brakes unstuck and replaced the water pump and timing belt. I'm waiting to get all the vacuum lines in. It currently fires up, but dies almost immediately. I also picked up a 3.0 engine at the same auction that I will be going through to make sure it's in good shape. I may end up doing a 3.0 swap, but I want to get the car back on the road first.

I have plenty of experience with various British, German, American, and Japanese vehicles. This is my first foray in to the Italian automotive scene, and I am looking forward to it. I have read a lot of posts on here already, and I just wanted to thank everyone for this resource. When I feel that I am stuck, I'm glad to know this forum exists, and it looks like it is still quite active.
 

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Thank ya. I have actually read quite a bit of your site, and I downloaded the service manuals have linked. I also found Greg at HiPerformanceStore's website. Turns out, he is only a few miles south of me. I'm also in Sapulpa. I had no idea his shop existed until I bought the car.

Do you have any suggestions for waking a Milano that's been down for 15+ years aside from what I've already tackled (belts, fuel pump, vacuum hoses)?
 

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Similar questions have been asked before on the forum so you should search for those to get some more ideas. Whatever fuel that is in it has gone bad, hopefully not gumming up your injectors. If it has then Greg used to have a service to clean them, not sure if he does any more. I'd check the fuel pressure (recent thread on that) and do a compression test to see where you are at. Vacuum leaks are always a problem on cars that haven't been touched in some time, Greg also used to have silicone hose kits that I've used in the past and work well although a little pricey.
 

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1984 GTV6, 1973 Berlina, 1987 Milano
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Welcome!

When you drain out the old gas I would try to replace as many old fuel injection hoses as you can. I recently bought a GTV6 parts car cheap because on the first drive after getting it running again a fuel line split and burned everything in the engine compartment.

Most of the fuel line is 8mm or 5/16".

Also check the rubber brake hoses as well.

Cleaning up old electric connections is always a good idea as well.

Don't press the throttle pedal while trying to start it, you can sometimes get a backfire and pop off the intake.

Post up some photos, the Gold trim level is one of my favorites. We race a Milano in Lemons.

Sent from my GM1917 using Tapatalk
 

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When you drain out the old gas I would try to replace as many old fuel injection hoses as you can.
I agree. If the Milano is the same as the GTV6 the short hoses between the fuel rail and the injectors is an odd size - 7.5mmID. 1/4" is too small and 5/16" is too big. Note that the shop manual advises one to use a soldering iron (they translate it as a 'welder') to melt through the old hoses for removal. This avoids the nicks a knife might make in the hose barbs. Yes, it is safe to use the soldering iron to melt through the old hoses - just don't light a cigarette while you're doing it!


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Good point, checking those injector hoses should be done first, if they leak you could start a fire. Centerline Alfa should have the 7.5mm hose. Another fire related thing to check is the heater fan location under the dash where the resistors are. That can fill up with leaves and then the resistors can ignite them.
 
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