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Discussion Starter #1
Now that I've got mine back from the shop, I can fix the little things I had to since I've bought it and that is:

- replacing the fuel tank lid relay (I took the one that was there to make sure the one on the fuel pump was good);
- bolting the rear speaker covers tight, they rattle a bit once and then;
- fixing the switches for the rear windows on the console;
- get a new pipe for the turbo;
- replace oil filter just to be sure;
- fix the dipstick warning light;
- see if I can put rear seatbelts on it (weren't mandatory on the rear seats in 1988 but it has got all the fixing points).

And that's it for now. I've fixed a lot of things in it but I'm most satisfied with it. I had to fix a lot more stuff on the VW Passat my dad passed on to my brother. These days I don't want anything with a V and a W in it. You just wouldn't imagine all the trouble it gave us.

So, what's next for you? Have your to-do lists anything in common with mine?
 

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I am sure almost every 164 owner has at least one item in common with yours listed.....
I probably have all of your list and a lot more....currently rebuilding a 164.

The inside dash work is done having replaced stepper motor.
All the stuff behind the firewall has been replaced or serviced.
All nice and clean in there and at last I know what goes on in those dark depths.
 

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Dipstick warning light - I've got one of those to sort out (on someone else's 164). If my FIAT/Lancia experience is anything to go by, I don't think the sensor will be very repairable. It has a coil of wire that forms a tiny heating element wound around an even-tinier bimetallic strip; the heating causes a pair of contacts to open as the bimetallic strip bends (then, the warning light comes on).

If the engine oil is around the level of the strip, the oil conducts the heat away, so the strip doesn't bend and the contacts don't open. Light stays off.

Trouble is, the heating wire is in-series with the contacts, so if the heating wire breaks, the warning light will be on. Still, worth a try cleaning the contacts (if they are dirty, the light will be on). If you decide to bypass the sensor, don't short the wires together - use a 12 ohm resistor. The control unit supplies current to the heating element; if it is a short-circuit, current will be excessive.

I'm actually surprised the sensor ever works at all; seems a knife-edge piece of design and construction and would have been more reliable if it had used three wires rather than two. The control unit powers and 'reads' the sensor only when the key first goes on; the state is 'latched' after that, needs key-off and key-on to put the warning light out. Under certain hot-engine conditions you can get a warning that may be false and even the handbook says words to that effect. If this device were on an aircraft, there would be many grounded/delayed flights. At least, like the other warnings, it is a 'fail safe' arrangement - more likely to give a false warning than not to give a real warning.

But, it really did work once by alerting me to an actual low oil level when restarting after a long journey towing a trailer. The light came on, I checked the level, and it was below the lower hole on the dipstick. I topped up and the light didn't come on again. Amazing. These sort of anecdotes make it worth all the fiddling around to get warning lights operational. Maybe.


No rear seat belts - interesting! I thought all 164s would have come with those. Definitely all 164s sold in the US, Australia, the UK, and NZ anyway. Sure you'll find some in a later 164 and bolt the reels into the rear shelf, buckles under the rear seat.

Rear speakers - you'll have the earlier 6x4" type mounted in flimsy plastic housings at the sides (post-'90 cars have the 6x9" speakers bolted into the shelf). I find self-adhesive black felt (from a craft shop, made in Italy even) is helpful to line the edges of the housings as original (and prevent squeaks against the shelf). Go carefully removing the plastic press-studs exposed once you remove the seat back. I was a bit gung-ho and snapped off part of the speaker housing. Those forked trim-removal tools really help.

Rear window switches - again, the early type with the large, ribbed rocker top and arrows rather than 'window' icon - have fun polishing the contacts (fine sandpaper, metal polish), see pictures below, and even more fun getting the switch together. I find it best to squeeze the housing with a large pair of grips so that the sides bow out. Then you can push the rocker back in without the rocker tipping to one side and the switch contacts slipping sideways and jamming.

-Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've fixed one oil issue yesterday: erratic pressure readings. First thing as I bought the car, I changed the oil (there was hardly any left because the plug wasn't tightened properly and the damage it had suggested someone didn't care enough to buy a 12mm Allen to take the plug off). But then the pressure was never steady and the oil pressure light would even come on if the car was idling below 1000 rpm. Bought a new filter, topped up the oil and now it's usually around 1bar idling and 4 when I'm going fast. I've heard the low oil pressure is a common issue... Maybe I'll change to something thicker than 10W40.

The rattles in the speakers were easy to fix. Some hot melt glue and screws and they're pretty tight now, there's hardly a single rattle in my car and I'm very pleased with it. This city has the most horrible road building standards. Cobbled streets are all wavy and the few streets with tarmac in the centre are full of holes, patches and cuts. I get shaken all the time, so, I've always got to go at a snail's pace. I'll admit the Citroen is more convenient in that matter: it can go at any speed in any road, no matter how many holes it's got.

Anyway, now I've got another electric gremlin, but I'll deal with that in a new topic.
 
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