Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I would appreciate some help.
I am in the process of installing a new clutch in my 67 Duetto. This vehicle has a mechanical linkage clutch and a floor mounted peddle box.
I have the Centerline General service manual and it is helpful but does not cover things in enough detail for me.

Which service manual should I buy that will help me work on this particular car?

I have viewed most of the previous threads on tranny removal and I am confused. Is it logical for me to think that I can change the clutch without pulling the engine on this car?
I presently have the car resting up on stands. The driveshaft and the crossmembers are disconnected. The rear tranny mount is removed. However now the rear clutch actuation lever hangs beneath the tranny and must be removed. It appears to be retained to the cross shaft with a pinch bolt - so I removed the nut from the end of the pinch bolt but the bolt or pin will not budge. Do I just need to force that pin out?
Or do I have to remove the complete lower peddle box to get that lever out of my way?
I realize that if the peddle box has to come out then the whole exhaust must come out?
I can see ( sort of ) that the starter will be my next challenge.
Am I going about this whole job wrong?
It is a good thing that I am retrired and that I have all winter to get this done.
Any advice will be appreciated.
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
You've got the same problem I have had in the past putting a clutch in. No worries, just some more time and aggrevation.

First, you can take the gearbox and bellhousing off of the back of the motor with the engine in the bay, but you'll likely need to take the exhaust off at the headers first (I did without checking to see if I could do it with the exhaust on, so I may be wrong about that). Once everything is disconnected, the motor and gearbox will want to sag down at the rear. If you have loosened all the bolts attaching the bellhousing to the engine (including that dadgum special starter bolt), it will pull loose if you pull straight back on the box. Make sure you are not going to punch a hole in your radiator when the motor rocks back, and consider a block of wood between the head and the firewall to save you throttle linkage. Also, be careful when you wrestle the box loose from the motor, as you'll be surprised how heavy 50 pounds feels when it comes loose. Also, you will likely booger your pilot bushing, so you'll want to think about a new one. After doing it both ways, I will always remove the motor and gearbox first, and do the repairs on my stand. Either way works, but the motor-out method was easier in the long run for me.

As to the lever, if you search Pinch Bolt, you'll probably find my thread asking the same question. Answer: It should come out if you tap it with a drift (be careful not to booger the threads on the nut side), but mine did not. I was afraid I would damage my pedal box if I hit it any more. I eventually just took the pedal box down (thus, having to disconnect the brake master) so I could get the box off. I also took the opportunity to "press" the tapered bolt out with a two-jaw puller so I could put the brakes back together and still get the box back in. It's a pain, but I just could not get my bolt to come out.

Also, consider the popular rear main seal and flywheel reconditioning debates while you're in there. Some replace the seal and get the flywheel resurfaced, and some don't. Sounds like either way is OK if it is OK with you.

As to manuals, the reprint of the factory service manual worked pretty well for me. Also, the parts diagrams in the reprint parts manual really help a lot. Like instructions to a puzzle.

Best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks OCaF,
18 short years ago I installed a whole new exhaust system on this car. Fortunately, I used stainless steal fasteners in the whole system so taking it off was easy. Upon careful inspectionThe peddle box needed some attention because one of the shafts was bent - so taking it all apart was a good idea. The brake lines to the master cylinder were rusted and twisted off during removal so they need to be updated as well. Now as long as the brake fluid is half drained out I will rebuild the wheel cylinders as well. I did that 18 short years ago as well.
I will eventually get to dropping that tranny.
Thanks for the advice and encouragement - I now have enough work to last easily till Xmas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
Excellent. I had exactly the same experience (with the brake lines, etc.). Funny how these projects start to develop a life of their own. That's what makes these older Alfas so much fun, especially when you have plenty of time and no deadlines to meet.

Enjoy!
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top