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Discussion Starter #1
This is the 2nd time in 2 years or less that my 164B has fried a N41 relay for the ask and rear parking lights. Last time I had a 10a fuse in instead of the required 7.5. This time the correct fuse was installed. Is this the kind of thing that happens when they fail, or is mine out of the ordinary?
 

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This is the 2nd time in 2 years or less that my 164B has fried a N41 relay for the ask and rear parking lights. Last time I had a 10a fuse in instead of the required 7.5. This time the correct fuse was installed. Is this the kind of thing that happens when they fail, or is mine out of the ordinary?
Check solder joints very very carefully. A possible problem is a cracked or loose joint which could be causing the failure. Use a magnifying glass to really see the issue. I have fixed many similar relays by cleaning and resoldering the joints.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I can see 1, maybe 2 failed solder joints. I don't think I can turn down my propane torch low enough to solder them:)
 

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if you want to send to me

I'll solder em back up and return to you if you can;t find someone local;
 

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Discussion Starter #6
PIC of N41

Another pic of N41
 

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Just go to your nearest Radio Shack, buy a cheap small electronics soldering iron (I've got one that is 15W/30W) and do the job. Easy to do. There should be enough solder at the joints to reconnect everything. All you need to do is just reheat the connections until the solder just melts. Just don't overheat of course.

You could send one to me, and I can do it if you don't feel brave enough. I've fixed at least one of these, and I've built many a Heathkit. Most people these days don't know what these were, lol. In fact, I'm still using an AR-29 receiver next to the computer for talk radio while on the computer.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Unfortunately, I'm old enough to know Heathkit. I built a Knight kit once.
 

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Oh Heathkits

I built a VOM when I was about 11 or 12, and a color dot and bar generator for adjusting TV yokes/guns when I was 13. I still have the VOM and will see if I can find it and post a photo up! Actually had modified a pair of WM-5 amplifiers way back in the day and subsequently sold em to another stereophile!

AND I still have not only my pencil iron, but the HONKIN 150 watt/300 watt WELLER soldering gun I've had since I was about 10. Still works great but less and less things suitable for 'welding' with that big boy!

Heathkits -- what great products.
 

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Why do the older Ungar and Weller irons seems better? Heat is heat right?
Getting too old. Heathkit catalog were my favorite when I was a kid.
Jim
 

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All you spoiled rich kids bought HeathKits. I could only afford a Knight Kit:) It actually worked after a little trouble shooting. Then my parents liked it so well they had a cabinet built for it and put it in the living room. So much for having it in my bedroom:(
 

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I dont know Knight Kit

what kind of stuff did they have? What were they like?
 

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I was after a sound system, so that's what I was looking for. They may have carried other stuff, not sure. I thought the kit was good. The instructions were quite detailed. Of course, a step down from HeathKit:)
 

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Yah, have one of the pistol Wellers, two temps with dual lights. You are correct, very heavy duty. A little overkill for electronics and my train layout wiring.

What I really liked about the Heathkit stuff is that you got the greatest assembly manual which you could use to not only build the unit, but also calibrate and troubleshoot, and fix it if a component went out. And, the circuit diagrams and boards are shown. Really cool stuff. Modern kids, with all their inane texting, etc, just don't what they are missing. Many of them have to be shown where the key goes. These kits, along with the old full house Gilbert Chem sets (yes, you could blow the house up, and gas yourself big time), Erector sets, etc, were how we learned how things worked and how to design neat stuff.

Sorry for the wandering, but hey, this stuff has always helped in understanding how to fix Alfas, among everything else.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I got an older sears solder iron at a garage sale. It is also massive. Too big for fine circuit
boards, but heats up fast and has lots of heat. I dropped it on the floor, shattered the case, glues it back together. It never missed a beat.
Del you left out LOGO and Lincoln Logs:)
 

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No, I was more an Erector set man myself, although I did have Lincoln Logs as well. Loved those nuts and bolts, since I was raised on them, my father being a licensed airframe and engine mechanic as well as managing B-17 and B-29 lines during the war.

Also had a set of plastic "bricks" (forgot the name) that you could make a house with, complete with window frames, doors, etc. Long gone of course. Way earlier and better than Lego in my book in detail.
 

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I remember those as well:)
 

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I did run across Velleman electronics kits. Not large, but still fun. I used one as a variable timer for letting the fan run on for a while after I shut the engine off.
 
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