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Here is an interesting "non-Alfa" that may just have had an Alfa Romeo connection when it was built? It may be that others have already learned more about the true origins and I would enjoy learning more about it as well. It would be nice to move the car to its correct location in my files ... if it needs to be moved. At the moment, I've left it under the "Volpini" heading as this is the name that it has carried for more than forty years ... at least. So, if you know something, as in ... ANYTHING ..., please share what you know, even if it seems like a "silly nothing".

The car in question is badged as a "Volpini" and is pictured in an Italian automotive encyclopedia ("Milleruote") as an example of a Volpini. There is a "Volpini-Arzani" nose badge and one of the instruments (at least) has "Volpini-Milano" as part of the graphics/artwork. Aside from that, I can only make guesses. I have seen no official paperwork associated with the car.

The chassis number is "0211463" and the more astute admirers of vintage Alfa Romeo cars will recognize that this number seems amazingly similar to a number that would have been assigned to an early Alfa Romeo 6C1500. In fact, a consecutively numbered Alfa Romeo (0211462) is known today! You can find references to it elsewhere on the AlfaBB. But, this is presuming that the number "0211463" is more than a mere numerical coincidence. It is, after all, just a number! However, an added detail is that the number is stamped in the chassis in two locations with a double-line font style that is quite typical of the stampings seen on a good number of Alfa Romeo 6C engines!

The chassis is a unique design so far as I know. It's main structure is constructed largely of rectangular tubing that runs in what seems to be a single piece from the front suspension in a "hoop" configuration around the engine and ****pit and back to the front on the other side. Think of the shape of the "omega" symbol (“Ω”) and then attach another closed "hoop" between the bottom ends of the symbol onto which the front suspension hangs. The front "arch" structure that is welded to the "hoop" is from a Fiat 500 "Topolino" that is heavily modified with all sorts of welding having taken place in order to stiffen it up and make it fit ... and perhaps disguise its origins. While working on the car briefly in 1997, I did a bit of detective work on my own time and determined that the chassis number of the donor Fiat was "Fiat 500*022085*".

The wheelbase of this car is roughly 2220mm - 2225mm.

The front suspension is composed of a pair of Fiat 1100 A/B/E lower A-arms and a pair of Fiat 500 lower A-arms moved to the top with Fiat (500 or 1100?) uprights in between. Coil springs and Luvax dampers are part of the arrangement.

The steering box may be Lancia but I am not certain of this. It has a number stamping "9214". I may add some photos later when I have time to dig them out and scan them.

The rear suspension is "live axle" on coil springs with upper & lower trailing arms which are made from stacked leaves and a short Panhard rod for lateral location.

The Fiat 1100S engine (N. 500334) fitted is clearly not the original as the mounting is an obvious adaptation. The engine block casting is dated 16 May 1949 and this is from relatively late in the series with the engine number "500334" having had its origins most likely in 1949 or 1950, perhaps most likely in a Pinin Farina "1100ES" version of the 1100S. The engine is fitted with an Abarth manifold that is marked "C" which is believed to be a racing ("corsa") version of three similar manifolds that were marketed by Abarth. The carburetors are Weber 32DRNP2 and appear to date from approximately 1952 but this estimation is based on too little data to be truly meaningful.

The Borrani 60-spoke wheels (15" x 3.00") are on 42mm hubs and have 60 spokes each. They are not dated and they are not typical of the sort of wheels used by most "name" builders who were constructing cars for racing use during the late 1940s and erly 1950s.

Only two of the Borrani hub-adapters appear to be numbered and they appear to date most likely from 1950 or 1951. The car could certainly have had earlier origins on different hubs but this may be a clue to "when" the car was built or converted to the (mostly) current configuration? The body also appears as if it could have come easily from this time period.

Returning to the engine mounts, I have not yet forced myself to go measure the mount points of the Alfa Romeo 6C1500 N. 0211462 but I have to say that, conceptually and spatially, they look quite similar. Part of the reason for making this posting is to try to force myself to go and check. I took dimensions from the "Volpini" but have not looked them up yet. I am hoping to do my checking "without prejudice".

Photos attached here show the car at what was supposed to be an event held during the 1960's. It could very well be from the 1970's? The second and third images show the car when I first saw it in 1988 at the Mille Miglia. The owner was Jack Armstrong, an American Olympic athlete who you might remember from his appearance on "Wheaties" cereal boxes, I think of the 1960's. The last photo shows the car in an advertisement from 1992.
 

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VOLPINI

Goodmorning all,
I'm looking for any info of the Volpini name. It was active in the late 40s in Milan. I'm trying to locate any heir or "expert" about the name.

It built some F-Juniors and some sport barchettas.

Furthermore: I'm looking for "rich" photo archives of the Mille Miglia. I already tested Sorlini and Mille Miglia Museum but I didn't succeed in finding adequate solutions for my research.

Hope any of you will be able to help me.

Best regards
 

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I'm looking for "rich" photo archives of the Mille Miglia. I already tested Sorlini and Mille Miglia Museum but I didn't succeed in finding adequate solutions for my research.
Why not?
Because there weren't Volpinis enough or at all? You found two of the largest archives about that argument....
I suggest you to make an inside out research: first the cars and then the races.
 

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There is already a thread on Volpini (see here). I'll ask mods to merge them.
 

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Volpini

Do a google search, they made sports cars, Formula 3 and Formula Jr cars in the 50s60s, I thought the name sounded familar, I played with FJ cars "very unsuccessfully" in the late 50s early 60s and found a lot of information on Stangulini and Volpini FJ cars at that time through Road and Track and other Sports car magazines. They both used fiat 600 brakes, suspension and 1100 Fiat engines, but were always out of my price range at the time, and probably are even today.

Good luck finding what you are looking for. OFRACER
 

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Discussion Starter #7
"alveng"

La sua richiesta e' troppo vaga (anzi troppo ampia) per sapere cosa posso offrire per assisterla. Lei sta cercando notizie delle vetture Volpini o di altro? Una vettura specifica?

John
 

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I owned and raced this car in the early 90’s. Raced at Laguna Seca, Sears Point in vintage races. It was a crowd pleaser.
 
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