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My engine was completely rebuilt 25 years ago. I switched to synthetic oil after the burn-in period. I started with Agip 10W60, then switched to Redline 10W50, Valvoline VR1 10W60, and eventually, in the last years, Valvoline VR1 5W50. I have no oil leaks or consumption, and there is no visible camshaft wear, despite the fact that the car has covered 110K km since the rebuild and is equipped with a high-lifted camshaft and a stronger valve spring.

This is only my personal, limited experience.
 

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Andylary: I was thinking along the line of the synthetic oil not allowing
the rings and piston wall "breaking in" properly.
I know this, but I was hopping a few pros would jump in here to help
for all those newbies planing to do their first rebuild...
To me, your choices are great but the why is just as important...
 

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I'm no metalurgist, nor do I have thousands of hours on an engine dyno or hundreds of test engines built and disassembled for inspection. But, I have read from many that our old-design Alfa engines benefit from a conventional oil break-in period. After that, synthetic oil is great. Since I only put a few thousand miles a year on my Alfa engines, (I have several) and I like to change the oil at least once every two years, I choose the lesser expensive conventional.
 

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Many available reliable engine oils and individual preferences based experience. This post originally posted by JockR may be as equally important as selecting the optimum oil.
 

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Richard Jemison
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New "Build" does not change the clearances in the engine. They are far "looser" than engines of the last 20 years.

Synthetic oil Molecules are a fraction of the size of Petroleum oils and rely on additives to prevent scuffing.
All the cam manufacturers warn against using synthetics in "solid lifter" engines. Guess what? That`s
all Alfa uses in our cars.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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Synthetic oil Molecules are a fraction of the size of Petroleum oils and rely on additives to prevent scuffing.
All the cam manufacturers warn against using synthetics in "solid lifter" engines. Guess what? That`s
all Alfa uses in our cars.
Richard, I'm afraid you really have no idea what you're talking about here. None of that is true even for the original Group IV synthetics. And as I explained above, "synthetic" on the bottle doesn't mean anything specific these days anyway. You're just repeating 40 year old myths.

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Anyway, if anyone is worried about their motor oil, send a sample to Blackstone. If you're getting excessive metals wear it'll show up in the analysis. If the metals look good then nothing is being scuffed or damaged and the oil is protecting fine.
 

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Richard Jemison
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Richard, I'm afraid you really have no idea what you're talking about here.

Gubi, I know exactly what I speak about here on the BB. You seem only spew your opinions.

Have you bothered to look at the warnings on using Synthetics on solid lifter cams? Do some research.

Here`s some info on Synthetics that you must have missed:


"Semi- or full-synthetic oils are required for most newer cars, but it is vital that the automaker's recommendations be followed, or accelerated engine wear and other problems could result," Technical Services Manager for AAA tells Machinery Lubrication.

"Synthetic oil is a lubricant made up of artificially made chemical compounds; these compounds are made by breaking down and then rebuilding petroleum molecules. Under a microscope, a drop of synthetic oil shows millions of molecules all nearly the same size and structure. Conversely, mineral or conventional oil is made using refined crude oil. A drop of conventional oil under a microscope shows millions of molecules all with different shapes, sizes and structures.

It is possible that some formulations of conventional mineral oils may exhibit superior performance on certain properties".
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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"More uniform" doesn't mean smaller, and "possible" isn't data. And all motor oils rely on additives to help prevent scuffing: I think you're conflating the ZDDP reduction in API SN oils with synthetics somehow, and the two are not linked.

Anyway, I know I'm not going to change your mind. I post this stuff so others can hopefully look into it, learn things, and not fall for outdated tales. There have been a LOT of changes in this stuff over the past 40 years.
 

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Richard Jemison
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Gubi, You are just spewing your opinions. Tales they are not!
You post guite a lot, but I haven`t seen any that had much USEFUL info.
So I`m now going to block your post.
 

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I run my 88 and 93 normally and feel comfortable using what is recommended- part sint. The synthetic keeps the seals from drying out since it sticks and the crude helps with old fashioned performance. That is all.
 

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I’ll go rogue and tell ya what I use — whatever I can find that’s cheap - with a small bit of additive- I trawl Craigslist and Facebook marketplace, looking for motor oil. Find it pretty often - someone cleaning their garage, a case of Pennz oil 20-50 for free. Date code 15 years ago. 3 cases Kendall racing oil ( now called Brad Penn) - 30 bucks. Date code 20 years ago. Another case of Castrol 20-50 for free, gotta be at least 15 years old. Two 5qt Mobil 1 10-40 for $10. I check for homogeneity ( ie no separation) then I use it. Everyone clutch your pearls!!!!
 

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Any motor oil that complies with current API regulations is at least a blend of group II base oil (Dino juice) and group III (Hydrotreated, aka some form of synthetic). Motor oil strictly based on group II would be pretty hard to find these days.
 

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@ goats. Very resourceful of you.
I've picked up a few cases of oil that's been sitting.
Motor oil doesn't break down.
Mother Earth spent millions of years making it.
What's another 10 or 15 years?
 

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Another ditty about oil, heard years ago, is that it never loses its ‘oiliness‘ - it just gets dirty and the additives degrade, so is recycled by cleaning and refreshing additives.
 

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@ goats. Very resourceful of you.
I've picked up a few cases of oil that's been sitting.
Motor oil doesn't break down.
Mother Earth spent millions of years making it.
What's another 10 or 15 years?
But be careful. The additives can separate out and settle to the bottom of the bottle.
 
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Another ditty about oil, heard years ago, is that it never loses its ‘oiliness‘ - it just gets dirty and the additives degrade, so is recycled by cleaning and refreshing additives.
Not quite right. Some base oil molecules break down, reducing viscosity. Then under excessive heat, some more molecules oxidize, which means they stick up together, making the oil sludgy. No, both phenomena don't balance each other.

Proper recycling involves re-refining.
 
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