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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What can anyone tell me about adapting a modern ignition system to a gtv6? What are the advantages/disadvantages? Any answers will help. Thanks.
 

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There won't be any performance advantages on a stock engine. If it's a programmable system which would usually be a part of an entire engine management system it will have the advantage of being tuneable to match hotter cams or whatever mods you have done.

If it's not programmable the only real advantage I can think of would be the possibility of more common and or less expensive replacement parts.

Greg,
Silicone Hose Kits
OKINJECTORS.COM
 

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By modern, do you mean aftermarket programmable like MS or Haltech??

If so the main plus is you can get rid of the air mass flapper which is restrictive compared to MAP/TPS sensor. Or on my Alfetta, the mechanical system.

Amazon has the accel thruster system for 550$ (narrow band O2 and new old stock from 2/10) Great deal however....

I have only used Haltech with very good results on a turbo 4 banger and the F10x on a gtv6 which ran great right out of the box.

Wish I could get my hands on another F10x, but they stopped making them a year ago or so...

If you are not familiar with the Bosch system, installing an aftermarket system will be challenging.

Why?
because the only timing mark will be by the dizzy, so you will need to add crank or cam sensor to get full sequential FI (the best) vs batch fire. Also, you will have to adapt a 4 wire IAC because Bosch is 2 wire and most aftermarket systems (except MS which you can put in some jumpers and change a resistor) use 4 wire IAC.

Best bang for buck is to get a 3.0liter for the gtv6
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've thought about which 3.0L to get. Could you give me an idea in pricing for either a 164S engine or a 24v. And if I go either route should I just stick with my 2.5L system or go with a new ignition system? I think I'm looking for the most fun with my car at a price in willing to go for.
 

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verde 3.0's can be had for 400-1200$ depending on condition and owner. generally around 700$ with all attached parts.

3.0 12v 164 engines 600-1200$ depending on condition and owner, also, you will need a bunch of conversion parts like oil pan, flywheel, verde front cover, crank pulley engine mounts, head cover plate and intake parts

3.0 24 valve engines very rare. there was one on ebay a month ago for IIRC 800$, but condition unknown

In any case you can expect to rebuild these for a cost of at least 400 including new rings, V-springs and gaskets. if you need head work, add another 250$ plus parts. oil pump 200$. sleeves and pistons 700$.

Once rebuilt correctly, these are great engines. I would choose the 12v 3.0 as they are more common and have less parts.

BUT: I have a strong 2.5 with verde cams in it and it is a super sounding engine with great pull. So rebuilding a 2.5 is also a good option.
 

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I have a GM Delco computer on mine (from a Holden Camira, but US models also use them). It is programmable injection and ignition and uses a MAF sensor, so no air flow meter is required. Works well and the ECU cost $100 not $1000 :)

check this out for more info

delcohacking.net • View forum - Delco ECU Conversions
 

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I have a GM Delco computer on mine (from a Holden Camira, but US models also use them). It is programmable injection and ignition and uses a MAP sensor, so no air flow meter is required. Works well and the ECU cost $100 not $1000 :)

check this out for more info

delcohacking.net • View forum - Delco ECU Conversions
Fixed it for you ;).

What interface did you use for tuning? Real time like the Kalmaker or some other method?

Fully programmable fuel and ignition tuning will allow you to get the best out of YOUR engine, so long as you have accurate feedback (a decent dyno) to tell you when you are getting the best power output at any rev/load/inlet air temperature combination.
That, and from what I've read, fuels now a days burn a bit faster than the older fuels but still have good octane values. So with older ignition timing and air/fuel ratios you probably won't be suffering any knock issues, but you probably won't be getting the best performance either.
You can run a distributor-less ignition system with coils on plugs and do away with a couple of metre of high tension ignition leads. 1 good set of leads would make a decent dent in a full 6 coil ignition system.
Chuck in the ability to cater for future modifications, you can tune cruise points to run leaner (some computers have dual maps, 1 could easily be a lean cruise map) it all equals WIN! So long as you get the job done properly (good installation and tuning).
 
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