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Discussion Starter #1
I'm just curious how well the Milano LSD works. Anyone out there who's driven both transaxles and can provide some experience of the differences in spirited driving? What's it feel like? Is it apparent with a non Verde engine?
 

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Richard Jemison
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The Verde transaxle is a high geared LSD(3.54 Diff). If you want an LSD for "Spirited driving, source a Platinum (4.1 diff.)
As to handling the Transaxle cars don`t get a real boost from the LSD application with any of the stock engines. If the engine is making at or over 250 HP then the LSD will control inside rear wheel spin in a sharper corner.
Ric Lovecchio (? hope I spelled it right/ RML) raced his Alfetta with an open diff for many years.
 

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Having raced an Alfetta with both the open diff and now with the Milano LSD as well as having a Verde daily driver, I'll try to help.

As Richard states above the big difference is noted in the tighter corners. With the open diff, even with our underpowered (150 hp) 2L if a tight radius corner was not entered correctly (all of the braking done prior to corner entry and throttle back to WFO before you turn the steering wheel) you would induce quite a bit of wheel spin and corner exit speed would suffer badly. With the LSD the car is much more forgiving of bad technique.
Outside of an AutoX or race track the only time you will even notice the LSD on a street car is at times of limited friction and enthusiastic throttle input.
 

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A few years ago I got a call from Al Mitchel on a Saturday afternoon asking if I had a spare transaxle. He and his wife Mel were racing at Kershaw, SC which is about an hour from me. I told him that I had one that I had pulled from a Milano Gold, it was still in the Dedion and I had no knowledge of its condition. Mel showed up and we loaded in into the truck. They installed it and Mel won her class the next day. I am pretty sure that Al told me that the car was slower but easier to drive with the open diff.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, everyone. I wasn't sure it would be a big difference with our 158hp cars but I figured the Verde would make better use of a LSD. I didn't realize the Verdes had different final drive ratios so that probably doesn't help things. Do people ever put the Platinum LSD in their Verdes?

I originally thought that I almost never spin or slide my car. I do have Falken RT615k tires so the car does enough grip in most situations. But then I remembered on some tighter, uphill canyon roads off of PCH, my Milano does lose traction and spin the inside wheel quite a bit. And when it does, it takes quite awhile to regain traction without bogging the engine. The De Dion does offer lots of rear traction but once our cars lean a certain amount and the weight transfers, the traction on that inside wheel goes away. I'm sure everyone knows about that Alfa lean I'm referring to, ha ha. I would think the LSD helps a lot in these cases.

Also, I'm sure wet weather driving is probably improved.

Wish I had picked up the tranny from that Platinum I saw in a pick a part many years ago....
 

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I had a hot 3L motor and a platinum transaxle in my GTV6. It also had dropped spindles and 27 mm front sway bar and torsion bars. It was very stable at medium to high speed and I could get on the gas very early coming out of turns but it was the opposite of nimble - almost impossible to generate any oversteer. Turn 14 at Kershaw is about 110 degrees leading on to the start/finish straight and it is the one that you want to nail. There were a few times when I either turned in a bit to soon or braked a bit too late and ended up on the rumble strip on the exit. I think that with an open diff I could have generated some oversteer and stayed on the track. But when I got it right I had very good acceleration on to the straight. So in that case the open diff was more forgiving but in the hands of a better driver the LSD would be the winner.
 

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I have lsd in my Verde and it comes in handy in rallycross on the dirt. Tight turns and looser gravel, I'm able to drift through turns pretty readily, but that's what you want to do. Tarmac tracks not so much. I'm pretty sure the rally cars in Europe had LSD. What would Yves Loubet want in his drives in tighter road course turns? I'm sure everyone has seen the video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7VmDlS0Bao
 

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I have both a GTV6 and a Milano Verde and as other have said the LSD is very noticable when turning tight, especially in the rain. The GTV6 will just spin the inner tire and the Milano's rear will hang out as long as throttle is applied!

I rebuilt my LSD about 11,000km ago and when it was very new you could feel it when turning slowly on dry pavement, but it has since broken in and loosened up a little. If yours is original and high mileage, id say its getting tired and could use some new coated plates. Regardless of the wear though the diff should still work and lock to some degree still; because of the 'ramps' inside the differential this would be considered a 2-way LSD as the ramps are on both the accelerate and decelerate side
 

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My wife spun our auto 75 once on a wet surface, turning out of a side road. With her mother on board. Shame there was no in car video!

Quite why Alfa fitted an LSD to that model is beyond me but it was pretty easy to hang the tail out.....
 

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Yes, that was definitely a "win-win," but, two gearbox changes in two days is approaching my maximum cumulative dose of fun for a race weekend.
 
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