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Don - I found the same rubber/foam strips in the door opening (your 2nd picture), mine were covered in paint from previous resprays so I assumed that they were original, presumably to keep the rain out.
It's unlikely that the area where the rubber strips are placed would be prone to rain problems. I suspect rattling and/or wind noises may be the reason why they were installed.
 

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Another change from the '59 is a drain tube that extends down from the bottom of the windshield side uprights through a dimpled hole in the plate that covers the upright attachment nuts.
The same system is present on the 2600

It's unlikely that the area where the rubber strips are placed would be prone to rain problems. I suspect rattling and/or wind noises may be the reason why they were installed.
Agree with you.

Well done Don !
 

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Discussion Starter #83
It's unlikely that the area where the rubber strips are placed would be prone to rain problems. I suspect rattling and/or wind noises may be the reason why they were installed.
You may be right. But.... back in the late 60's and through the early 80's, something as simple as the front rubber door sealing strip would not have been easily found. I can imagine an owner of such an old and worthless car would have simply tried to stop the drip on his pants leg, without realizing where it was coming from, or what might have failed to allow it in.

Plus, Touring doors with good perimeter seals do not rattle.
 

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Discussion Starter #85
I'm beginning to think factory....
 

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My car #836 had them from the factory....... Also, I confirmed I did not use an E-brake handle from a 105 for my 102 spider.
Looks like a very nice car Don... All the best
 

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Discussion Starter #87
I note that the picture above does not have the hole in the cover-plate for the drain tube. I vaguely recall that my car, 00072, has a third hole in the upper body panel, which I always wondered about, but no tube or hole in the cover plate.

I'm going to have a small batch of door hinge pins made. Let me know soon if you want any.
 

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Discussion Starter #88 (Edited)
Rear end removal. No honey. Not you. Put down the knife

I got all the stuff under the car in the rear out and onto the floor. It was momentarily exciting when I detached the two nuts, one holding the top of a shock and the other holding a piece of all-thread where the shock used to be. The springs still had quite a load, and as I had the rear end supported by my floor jack, the car jumped about 9" into the air, fortunately coming back down on the jack stands. Phew. A couple of inches left or right and it might have turned out differently.

The rear brakes do not appear to be self-adjusting, but they have that funny big knob just like the front. I have no idea what it does, or how it does it. Inside that knob is a pin that fits into a grooved pin. On first glance, it would seem to be more of a guide than anything that would adjust the clearances. Lots of meat left on the linings. Cylinders frozen, but oddly clean. I'll soak them in a variety of magical, holistic essential oils, and dangle a crystal over them. The California method.

The axles required both persuasion, and heating around the end of the housing to encourage looseness. The bearings finally got unstuck, along with the axles. Hopefully nothing got bent in the process.

The oil inside, presumably since at least the 70s, was a medium amber and clear-ish.

The backing plates left and right are identical to each other. As assembled, this means the cylinder and adjusting shaft are clocked differently from side to side. I doubt it matters, but will research whether that's correct or not. Should I have a left/right backing plate? Parts book research.

After cleaning everything up, I'll haul the axle housing over to the powder coater, and the pumpkin down to Larry for a good check. That's a long time just sitting.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
I just checked the book. The rear backing plates should be different. This may be related to the right plate being painted green. According to the early 2600 manual (same rear brakes) the wheel cylinder should be behind the axle, hanging down at about 45 degrees. The crusty left brake assembly appears to match the book. The right assembly, oriented more or less vertically with the cylinder on the bottom, is incorrect.

Anyone have a late-version, right side backing plate? Oh. Wait a moment. I think I've got one on the entire rear end assembly out in the storage garage. I'd still need a replacement for that one, but at least I won't be held up.
 

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Don,
You are a guiding light for those of us who are sitting on our projects; your activities, which are inspiring, infuses us with the activation energy to get up off the couch and make progress on our own projects. You make it look so easy, attesting to your expertise in these areas.
You stated that you are sending the axle housing for powder coating.
Do you believe that powder coating and painting produce the same result? I do not believe that any of the parts of these vintage Alfa Romeo cars were powder coated. I only ask this because I have started to Powder coat many of the parts that were originally painted satin black, because I believe that powder coating is better. eg. Plenum tube on the 2600. I have wondered if this is ok for concours. I realize that there have been many arguments on this forum about original vs owner preference, but you expressed that you were gonna sell this restoration and the highest awards go to originality.

Also, I do not understand the reference to the funny Big Knob-where is the FBK?
Clear-ish is good for gear juice.

Lastly, what is your Magical, Holistic essential oil, concoction? (for soaking the cylinders)
 

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Powder coating is definitely not OE, even for modern cars.

But some consider it just paint ... I don't.
Pete
 

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Don, I can tell you that those pins on the shoes are intended to act as a massive frustration device when trying to both reinstall the shoes and fit the drums (especially the rears). Like you, I can see no other purpose. Hence my recent post about frustration on refitting both shoes and drums.

As to finishes. While I'm no expert, I have helped a friend who's father started collecting cars in the 50's out of Reno and focused on high end Euro stuff (Bugatti's, Merc SSK's and such) prep and show cars at Pebble Beach. I learned early about how the auctions go as some of his cars got moved from show to sell. To get top dollar I would replicate factory finishes whenever and wherever possible. Powder coating things? Not so much. Selling a restoration at auction for top dollar is very different than taking your car to shows next to those very same auctions. Buyers who pay top dollar typically know whats what for the era of car they are buying, if not the specifics of the manufacturer. It doesn't take much to drag the price down from the top to 25% less based on small (to you) details. I'm sure your car will look and be fantastic once you're done, but since your building to sell I'd recommend attention to (original) detail.
BTW - once again, thank you for taking the time to share your project.
 

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Discussion Starter #93
Random replies...

I powder coat things that aren't particularly visible, and live a hard life. Front suspension arms, springs, backing plates, rear axle housing, etc. Alfa used a lead-based primer that is tenacious as hell. Can't get that "original" material, so I use the improved version. The exterior paint also won't be lacquer. The under coating won't be gummy rubbery asphalt. And so it goes. My practice is to build the best car (or airplane) that I can, balancing a respect for originality with long term reliability, plus some added performance. I really don't care if my stuff sets price records. I decide what my price is, and am happy when, not if, I get it. I've told more than one prospective buyer they were no longer eligible to buy my work.

The reassembly of the brakes is relatively easy. The wheel cylinder is the "key", like a Chinese puzzle. Install the adjuster first, then hang the shoes-with-springs into the assembly. Last piece is wheel cylinder, while prying open the "jaws" of the two shoes.

The 102 with the Rover engine advertised in Hemmings for $240,000 is described as having a powder coated body. Bet that was an interesting job.

I reckon I'll send both of my rear end pumpkins to Larry for a check, as long as I'll be pulling the axles. That's the hard part.

And as for slavish originality....

I plan to use the cam grinds I have in the 102-2300, and an OKP manifold with 40DCOEs, plus the new plenum we designed for this mod. I'll include a box with a pair of freshly rebuilt 44PHHs, attached to a restored plenum and manifold, along with instructions on how to remove about 30 horsepower from the car. The buyer who will want my car will never use them. I don't do this to make statues.

If it ain't fun, I do something else.
 

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Discussion Starter #94 (Edited)
Fiddly work

The small number of pictures does not reveal the amount of time and work done today.

I got the screws reinserted into the right door hinge. PITA. I took them out when I planned to remove said body-side door hinge, but after removing discovered that this hinge was also welded into place. I guess Touring had concerns about their doors flying off at the eye-watering speeds achieved by the Solex-equipped 2000.

I spoke with Larry Jr today. The guts of the trans are surprisingly good, given the external funkiness. All the gears are good, but we're going to replace all of the bearings and some of the synchro stuff. He reckons it'll be good.

This led to a conversation about hardware. He's got a place not far away that does a black-zinc plating process that is a close match to the original black-oxide. We all know that the oxide finish sort of depended upon a prompt and continuous re-oiling, either from the engine or trans, to prevent rust from appearing. So, to take advantage of the minimum-batch price, I went through my years of Alfa hardware and dumped all of it that appeared like it would benefit. Some of these I had already done a black-sulfite blackening, but that requires a clear-coat to stop the rust.

It turns out I do have a left and right rear brake backing plate. One of them was just rotated funny by the hyper-active idiots who worked on this car several decades ago. They must be the ones who felt it was appropriate to paint everything green that they removed. Easy to trace their work, and give those areas some extra scrutiny.

Part of the fun of this project is the logistical skills I built back when my poor choice of parents forced me to work for a living. I now have the steel on the way for the rotisserie, the glass-slurry paint stripper/surface prep guy awaiting delivery of the rotisserie-mounted body, the body guy standing by with my project at the top of his list (best painter I've ever used), several thousand dollars of parts stacking up at Classic Alfa pending my "ship now" signal, Borrani of America pursuing a quote and clarification of just *** their catalog is trying to tell us, 3 more Pirelli CA67s en route, the chromer looking forward to a nice bump in his annual billings, quotes in hand from Donatella Esposito for the interior (choice of vinyl or leather?), and a nearby fellow Alfisto offering to come down and help. I'm going to take him up on that. He's the guy with the one-owner (his dad) 71 GTV in his garage undergoing a sloooooowwwww resto. He'll experience the other version down here. I suppose he thinks I'll help him with the 1750 GT when I finish this. Might just do that.

A pot of beans and sausage has been on the stove all day. I've just added some hot sauce that my (hopefully temporarily) absent wife brought home from her visit to her mother's services in Australia last year. I wonder if she was hoping this would kill me? For those of you who like a little spice in your life, one tooth pick dipped into this, and stirred into a bowl of chili was TOO MUCH. I've dolloped in what might be a lethal dose into about two gallons of pintos and sausage. If my regular posts cease, you'll know why.

Next week....

Trip to powder coater with first load.
Three wheels off to Stockton Wheel for straightening
Fly over to Lampson field near Clear Lake, CA to pick up my airplane, then down to APE/Tracy to drop off two rear-end pumpkins for inspection, along with a tub of hardware for plating
Start collating, photographing, and inventorying all the chrome and shiny bits that need to head toward Oregon.
Send two or three more orders to CA for stock-piling.
Send pictures of front wheel cylinders to both CA and OKP (both of whom have never heard of the late style brakes on a 102)

G'night Gracie
 

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Discussion Starter #95 (Edited)
I should add that Australia is the country that boasts of a company, "Dickens Cider" that offers amusing ads about their products.


 

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Discussion Starter #97
Yes it is, eh?

The hard part remains. This is all brute-force stuff. Air ratchets, screw drivers, and who cares if you scar the surface of the car?

The more rewarding part comes when one starts the reassembly on the pristine tub, making sure each bolt head and nut is the right type, in the right place, without fingerprints on the paint.

Ommmmmmmmmmmmm
 

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Discussion Starter #98
My Reno neighbor Joe Atencio came down yesterday, with his daughter, Jenna. We got the shop significantly straightened out. For the last few weeks, things were flying off the car and into a few labeled bins, or onto a shelf, or piled on the floor. We resorted bins, re stacked shelves, and got the bins organized. Floor cleared and swept. Not just everybody will volunteer to help clean up a shop. He might have been expecting to help remove the last few bits from the car, and we did some of that, but what we got done was a critical step. Thanks Joe!

I've kept the pink-fuzz-with-black-plastic insulation originally placed on the backside of the firewall. Anyone know where to get the best replacement for this stuff?

Steel for rotisserie arriving this week. That won't take too long to fabricate.
 

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AFRA knows about Self Adjusting 102 series brakes.

Don,
There is nothing strange to AFRA about the 102 series self adjusting brakes. They have two different types of wheel cylinders. When they are on ones care the real tip off is the round black piece on the side of the brake shoe that has to fit onto the pin on the backing plate. That black piece looks like a disk with a hole in the center on one side (that's where the pin on the backing plate fits) and what looks like a 24mm (or so) hex on the other (outside of the shoe). The front cylinders are different, and I used to have a photo of one with the crucial adjuster on the end that was broken off. I can't find that now, but I am sending you the catalog photos of front cylinders from AFRA showing the two different numbers. For example, the self adjusting are on my #00019 sprint (the latest model), but not on either my ancient #00126 spider or my even older #00900 sedan.

The secret to fitting the self adjusting brakes is to fit one end of the shoe in place, then be sure the pin is in the center hole of the black slider (other end of the shoe will be way out of place) and then tap the other end of the shoe to fit on the opposite side where it can also be secured. I do this one shoe at a time, then take one off to put the springs (they only stretch so far) onto both shoes and -- guess what? -- they fit wonderfully and push out to adjust to fit the drums when you first stomp hard on the brake pedal. I still don't know if Seattle Dan ever got his done.
 

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