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Congratulation Don !

PThe front suspension is completely done except for the sway bar and springs. I'll do the latter last, as it loads things up and makes it difficult to maneuver when needed.
Don't install the sway bar too late. I have been stupid enough to install it after the engine en the radiator was in place and I have been obliged to move out the radiator. It is much more easy when the engine is not there.

What is that ? You succeed with the regulator label ?

Four-wheels.jpg

Alfa-burpees need high quality wine ! especially when the Alfa is a Touring.
 

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Don't install the sway bar too late. I have been stupid enough to install it after the engine en the radiator was in place and I have been obliged to move out the radiator. It is much more easy when the engine is not there.
I agree. The sway bar drove me nuts -- including the fact that the rubber bushings where the sway bar attaches to the body are asymmetrical and if they're not installed correctly (what is up/down and front/back), the sway bar alignment is crooked. After trying several different approaches, the least hassle turned out to be to detach the front suspension (at the A-arms) on both sides, then install the sway bar, then attach the sway bar to the suspension, and then reinstall the front suspension again.
 

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Discussion Starter #563
Serge,

I found a gummed label. Probably one I’ve had for years. It turned up yesterday, so no need to make a decal. But thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #564
I agree. The sway bar drove me nuts -- including the fact that the rubber bushings where the sway bar attaches to the body are asymmetrical and if they're not installed correctly (what is up/down and front/back), the sway bar alignment is crooked. After trying several different approaches, the least hassle turned out to be to detach the front suspension (at the A-arms) on both sides, then install the sway bar, then attach the sway bar to the suspension, and then reinstall the front suspension again.
I’ve ordered some taps to open up the ID of the bar-end bushings. I expect to get the bar installed on Thursday or Friday.

The parts book shows washers on both sides of the Tee-bar end bushings. I’ve got the rubber (poly in my case) in place on the inside of the bushings, but can’t find anything in my carefully sorted parts like what is pictured for the outside of the bushings. Anyone got a photo?
 

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I'm not sure which washers you're referring to. Can you mention what table in the parts catalog you were looking at?
 

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Discussion Starter #566
washers on reaction "tee"

Here's a snapshot from the 2000 parts book. It's the same picture in the two versions of the 2600.

On either side of the upper two ends of the reaction "tee" are shown two washers. One is listed as being for the nuts that secure the bolt through the bushing, 1365.48.420. However, the picture shows a very large hole in the middle making it appear more suitable for fitting over the middle part of the bushing.

On the inside of the bushing is shown another item. It appears to be a washer, or a cup, but is somewhat faded out, and there is no part number pointing to it.

My spotty memory keeps telling me this is where a rubber washer/cushion or something goes, and in fact, I have a pair of poly units I bought years ago that fit perfectly in that spot. They may originally fit a 105 series car, but what is the non-numbered picture in the parts book?
 

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Here's a higher resolution version (from the 2600 parts catalog).

Since both, the 102 and 106 parts catalog list 4 pieces of 1365.48.420, I presume these parts used to be cups (as shown in the piece without a number) and the illustration shows both sides. It would be great if somebody has pictures of what the original parts looked like.

Pub. 1147 - p. 204 (cropped).jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #568
The catalog lists these as “washers for the nuts”. However, particularly if there should be four, I’m wondering if they were rubber “cups” that fit over both sides of the bushing? The 105 rubber/poly spacer fits on either side of the bushing perfectly. Although they aren’t cupped, they are held in place by the center steel component of the bushing assembly. We might guess they would help prevent noises under extreme loading, and slow down destruction of the bushing rubber due to sideways motion.
 

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The part number you reference 1365.48.420 is the same for 750's 101's and 105's and possibly on later. There are two.. one on each side of the bushing and are "spring articulating washers" or in other words "'springy, forgiving material" like poly that reduces ever so slightly any yaw component induced by the slip gap between the bolt shank and the inner bush. I think they were more of an engineer's CYA than anything else.There are no other washers or covers over them in these applications. They usually disintegrated from old age (which wasn't long) and the result was never recognized as the yaw component is pretty small in the first place especially with fresh bushings. The original ones were like the consistency of bee's wax. JMO.. Sorry ref your reara reaction "triangle".
 

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I think Ric is right, after looking into these(I have the rubber ones), they seem to be basically useless. Alfastop sells both(rubber and plastic) for the Giulietta suspension(same part # as what is listed in the 2000 Touring book).
 

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Discussion Starter #574
OK. So I've already got two poly units. I'll order a couple more. Hmmm. Maybe I've got two more hiding somewhere. These are not cupped as in the hand-drawing or parts book, but the poly is less likely to drift sideways, as it is much stiffer than the original.

I don't know how much they'll help, but the 102 has about as much lateral stability as a Walmart shopping car, traveling backwards in the wind. In addition to a steering box with is slightly iffy even when new, the front wheels have essentially no caster. Thus, very little self-centering action. Larry D told me I should dial in some caster, but the kingpin system doesn't really offer that as an option. Then, there's the Pirelli CA67s, which are comfortable to ride on, but have much softer sidewalls than modern tires, so add to the hunting while driving.

Oh well. Better go order a couple of more poly wafers.
 

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Discussion Starter #575
Abandon all hope, ye who enter here....

I've started the windshield install this morning. Not my first. Dear god, let it be my last.

On 00072 the original installer had executed an interesting interlaced fit between the post gasket and the bottom gasket. Of course, it was all dry and broken up when I removed it, but I was able to create a similar effect, with great care and aggravation.

This car, perhaps reflecting the full-speed production they were trying to achieve in 1960, appears to simply have the post gasket and bottom gasket terminated and butting at the lower end of the vertical post. I'm going to try and at least have the flat strip of the post gasket extend under the bottom gasket, the better to stabilize things and provide a better seal at the transition.

I am contemplating a deal with the devil to have the glass suddenly transport itself into place, rather than the extreme, and sometimes dangerous, acrobatics to get it to slide into position. Not sure I'm using my soul anymore, anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #576
I picked up a couple of reams today. One a .552”, the other .555”. I wanted a .554, but this was as close as I could get. I reamed out the upper bushings on the links, and the first one drove home with a perfect interference. The second hung about 1/8” short of home. That’s when renembered I had emerry-clothed the first pin, but not the second.

Size matters.

I’ve got spare bushings, so I’ll cut off the stuck one tomorrow, and hopefully finish up the sway bar.

I’ve decided to drive home the second link after I’ve got the bar in position. Too hard to fiddle into the car otherwise.
 

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Discussion Starter #577 (Edited)
Sway bar installation - duplicate post to ensure continuity of this build

It's easy, once you know how.

I'm going to assume you're starting with everything stripped, painted/powder coated, and ready to go.

Yes, the installation can be done with your suspension fully assembled, although I did my installation without the springs installed. That probably makes things easier, but maybe not, as mine were in full-droop anyway.

I recommend buying extra bushings for the down-links between the bar and the lower A-arm pin. You may make a mess of some.

The bushings we get these days are probably made in Pakistan or someplace, so the dimensions may vary from correct. I've had two that could be pushed through the link hoops. The bushings should be an interference fit into the links. The IDs can vary also, partly in the average size, and possibly in being oval. Dang.

Find, or have made, an insertion/removal ram for the bushings. I'll post a picture of mine later. It is essentially A) a flat round base that you can insert the link heads into, to stabilize them, and give you a larger surface area on your hydraulic ram base than just the link-heads would provide and B) a ram with a slightly smaller OD than the the bushing (so it will slide through the link head without itself becoming stuck) and a slightly smaller "lip" which will insert inside the OD ring of the bushing to keep it centered. These tools make things acceptably easy. Without them, you're a cave man using a club where a scalpel is required. Yes, you should already have a hydraulic ram. Nothing else will really do.

After you have inserted four new bushings, get out your micrometer. Note the OD of both the A-arm pins, and the sway-bar end-pins. On my car, the sway bar pins were much larger than the A-arm pins. This will be explained later.

Obtain a 14mm ream. You need this in your shop anyway. Well, maybe. Assuming your sway bar pins are around .556", ream the ID of the upper two bushings. A 14mm ream, although listed as .5512, will probably result in a finished ID in your bushing of closer to .5545" -.5555" or so. We'd like the upper pin to bushing installation to be a tight fit, but not one requiring damaging force. On my car, the bushings I received averaged about a .546" ID. A .010" interference installation is simply not going to happen in this particular installation. As it was, I also used some emery cloth on the pins to both smooth them, and to get maybe .0005" reduction. It took awhile. I kept working until I could get a hand-fit about half-way onto the sway bar pins, with the sense that if I continued, I'd have a problem getting them off again.

Test fit your upper bushings on the sway bar pins. You should be able to slide them about half way on, or slightly more, with the confidence that you've produced a good enough finish on the pins that you'll be able to tap the bushings home in the confined space behind your fully assembled wheel and brake assembly. There's not much room, so slight tapping is all you're going to get.

Check the lower bushings against the lower A-arm pins. If these were new, OE Alfa bushings, they would probably slide onto acceptably clean and polished pins. However, they won't be new, OE Alfa bushings. I used some coarse Scotchbrite wrapped around a 1/4" drill bit, and polished the inside of the bushings. Sometimes it required several repetitions. I expect the OE dimension was .546" for both the bushing ID and pin OD (you can convert that to metric at your leisure). With good consistency, and at equalized temperatures, the bushing should smoothly slide onto the pin. My bushings were not consistent, so some work was required. The problem is more likely your bushings than the pins, unless your pins got boogered up at some point in their life. Given its age, that's possible.

Now for the fun part, and AFTER you've confirmed the bushings will fit as described.

Install the sway bar rubber blocks into place on the bar, with the centering clamps and washers positioned inside of them.

Slide the sway bar into position. You may need to steer the wheels one way or another to get some clearance, but it is possible, without dismantling anything, to get the bar into its correct position. This is ABOVE the fore-aft structure connecting the major transverse structure between the front suspensions to the structure that is under the radiator.

Slide one link into position on either of the lower A-arm pins. Put on the nut and washer, but do not tighten. You need the link to easily rotate. Tighten them when you're done.

Move the bar as far away as possible from the link you just installed, toward the opposite side of the car. This will position the sway bar pin more or less directly above the link. Wiggle the upper link bushing onto the end of the sway bar pin. With some wiggling, the bushing should start sliding onto the sway bar pin. Once it's started, rotate the wheels to give you as much space as possible, and tap the upper link bushing fully into position on the sway bar. It is at this point you'll discover if you took enough time and care to get this slight interference fit correct. If you were able to get it all the way home, but only with careful tapping, you win. If it snaps all the way in, it's too loose, and you get to ask yourself if it matters, and then you suffer some sleepless nights, or another day redoing this bushing/pin interface. If it goes part way, and refuses to go any more, you've got to pull it all apart and finish the individual fitting that you left undone earlier. Good luck getting the stuck bushing off of the sway bar link.

Assuming you got the first side correct, go to the other side.

Install link onto lower A-arm pin, with nut and washer.

Slide the sway bar away from that wheel, toward the opposite side of the car. It will be more difficult to slide now, as the bushings on the other link will be resisting you. Put on your big-boy panties and shove. Once you have the bar far enough over, position the upper bushing on the link over the sway bar pin, and hope it starts. Once it starts, rotate the wheels, and repeat the tapping. If you got it all right, you can now turn your attention to putting the brackets over the rubber blocks and bolting them into place, and affixing the sway bar positioning clamps.

This job requires something better than Chateau Cardboardeaux, but it was quickest, and that seemed more important than quality at this moment.
 

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Discussion Starter #578
6” and growing

The snow. What’s wrong with you guys?!

My son came over, and we spent the day trying to install the windscreen. Got close, but I called an audible to think about a few things for awhile. We’ll try to wrap it up this week.

I strung the new e-brake cable, but it appears significantly too long. I’ll check it against 00072 when the snow breaks. What I got from OKP also didn’t include the short piece that connects from the center link to the left wheel. Maybe they’ve got those, as well.

Rear axle fully fixed in place. I’d have it finished, except the straps I got from CA are odd. There’s one wide and one narrow. I’ve never seen this before, including the set I ordered from Alfa when I was working at the dealer. Plus, the squat buffers from CA aren’t right.

So, in the last week, I’ve encountered:

Can’t finish the interior carpet, or install seatbelts because WULPH made the rear floor pan carpets wrong. Italy is out of stock. Says “two months”. What does that convert to when translating from Italian to English?

Wrong parts from CA, so can’t finish rear end install.

Cicognani left out two parts I ordered, but shipped and billed me for a duplicate order already received and paid for two or three months ago. Without one of those missing parts, I can’t continue with the trunk finishing. They also left off the windshield post gaskets, but to keep moving I bought them from Mr. Fiat, for a total of $52 for the pair!

My plan was to get as much as possible on hand early so the installation would breeze along smoothly.

We had a competitor at a company named “Kelkar” when I was the BAP store manager in Pasadena, Texas. His last name was “Schmidlin”, and certainly dead by now. He was infamous for selling people a knowingly wrong part, just to prevent the customer from buying it from a competitor. Then, as soon as the buyer left the store, he’d shop around town to get one quickly, or order it from an out of town warehouse. He’d apologize, seemingly sincerely, when the customer came back with the wrong part, and he’d exchange it for the recently received correct one.
 

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Hi Don,

I have a NOS buffer for a 102. In the research I've done. In the 2000 parts book I have which I don't have here with me at the moment. But they used different ones between the different models. One of the models using the same one as the 750/101 cars used. Which is the only one produced.

I think for use to use the ones that are available now you will have to flatten the steel plate.

Here are some pictures of it. If your interested in it send me a PM. I have no use for it.
 

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