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Discussion Starter #1
I’m doing a full rebuild of the front suspension of a 115 Super, and am starting the re-assembly phase. I'm doing a test-fit of the new lower a-arm bushing and have a question:

With a new bushing pressed into the a-arm and the a-arm installed on the dogbone, when the arm rotates on the dogbone axis, the inner sleeve of the bushing rotates relative to the dogbone shaft, rather than the inner sleeve of the bushing rotating relative to the outer sleeve. Is that normal? Are the dogbone shaft and the ID of the bushing supposed to be bearing surfaces? The dogbone shaft has a ground surface, so maybe that's really intended. However, there is clearly no permanent source of lubrication there. Is the idea that the bushing will eventually loosen up, as the bushing-to-shaft joint loses lubrication and tightens up? Seems like an odd system, but maybe that's the way it's 'sposed to work.

(BTW, for the dogbane nut I tried both the 40 ft-lb torque setting in the book, and 60 ft-lbs as suggested by @Tifosi in an old thread. Also tried adding an extra washer on the inboard side of the bushing, just to make sure the shaft threads weren't bottoming out. No difference in any of those variations -- the whole bushing still rotates relative to the dogbone.)

Any insight on this?

Logan
 

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Inner sleeve should not rotate. It nut and washers should lock it down on the shaft. The outer part rotates around the sleeve. Bushings are lubricated for life.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Figured it out. See my last post in this thread:

 
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