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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So last year I built this wind screen but didn't have a camera to show what I was on about.

Now that I've got the camera, I can finally share :)


If you look at the pic with 'fixing bolts' texted into it, you'll see where I removed the two outermost luggage skids that go in the cargo area.

Using #6 machine screws, some flat washers, 4 nuts and 4 wing nuts and drilling only 2 holes (that will never show if the cargo rails are put back in) I made the mounting system.

The shield was made out of one of the hunks o' 1/8" plexiglass they sell at home depot, and was large enough to get 2 panels out of in the event I broke the first.

The support bars are those 1/2" x 1/8" x 4' galvanized flat bars they sell for use in chain link fences.

The seats, if straight up, can go to the rearmost setting on the rail, and if you come forward 1-2 notches, they can be almost fully reclined.

The top can go up and down without removing the shield, so having to take it out or tinker with it isn't a neccesity.

The whole shield will fit in the trunk of the car, and if laid with the little support feet pointing up, will take up literally 0 trunk space. (of course there's a better chance of scratching the plexi if it's put in that way, but if you needed to stuff the trunk, you could)

BTW, the red vinyl on the lower 1/2 was something I had laying about that more or less matched my carpet and dash color, so I put that on as a 'lower level' deflector to stop air from coming in down low between the seats. It can be slipped right off with no problem.


As to effectivness, my wife can vouch for that.

Prior to this things creation, it was a 15 minute stop outside wherever our destination was so she could get her hair back in shape.

Post creation and install, the hair fix takes less time than what you spend at a short red light.

Net cost of the whole project: around $40

Net worth: priceless
 

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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's the spiffy part of it: the shield can be installed or removed in less than 3 minutes as it's held down onto the panel with wing nuts. ;) (the only thing left behind are the machine screws like what's shown in the 2nd pic)

I never worried about my hair, but the wife was having kniptions over it so something had to be done. (I didn't like the bungee solution, and no way was I going to pay over $200 for something that would just block my seat movement and make me cut up a perfectly good boot cover to just to use it)
 

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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
See if this brings it for ya Paul. (it should print out on a 8 1/2 x 11 if you rotate it 90 degrees)

As to the cargo panel holes, you kinda have to build the thing first to get them just right.

Remove the outermost scrub strips from the panel, come up through the bottom of the frontmost scrub strip mount holes with a #6 screw through broad washer (fender washer would be ideal) then through the panel, then a regular flat washer and nut to anchor it.

With the panel still off, and using the holes furthest out on the arms/uprights on those two screws, wing nut it in place, drill for the second set of holes and repeate the screw-washer-washer-nut as done in the front holes.

When it's done and installed, the headrests on the seats will brush up against the plexi just above the centerpoint between the upper and lower screws through the plexi proper.

Putting the top up and down can be done with the panel in place, though occasionally it'll 'just' rub the frame as it goes by so you may need to reach under there and give the panel a tug forward til the top clears.

The upright bars are strong enough to hold things in place, but just flexible enough where if someone moves a seat it'll give a bit instead of limiting travel.



****

LOL

Just noticed I didn't put the size drill for the holes in the support bars.

Those would all be 3/16" or 1/4", your druthers.
 

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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
FWIW, the wind blocker won't prevent your hair from getting messed up, it just lessens the degree. There's still plenty of breeze, but you can talk a bit easier and you might not lose your hat at highway speeds.
Just to drop a late note on that:

With the above panel, windows rolled up, wing windows turned out, I can go 65-70 down the road and have no concern about my *hat coming off unless it's a particularly windy day. 55 is pie, and all bets are off over 75mph. (with the vinyl sub panel on, you can even smoke and not worry about ash flying everywhere but in the ashtray)

I suppose I 'could' talk to my wife too, if I thought she actually wanted to hear what I had to say......


* I've got a pointy head too, which as we all know does very little to keep a hat on in a breeze.
 

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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Mabe lexan instead of plexi in the colder climates might be viable then.

I used lexan (1/8") as a storm door window with no ill effect down to at least 40 below zero F and it's been the same piece in the same door year round for going on 10 years now.

I just went with the plexi because I could get 2 out of the piece for less than half the price of what would have amounted to 1 in lexan. (ie: I'm a cheap bastard)

I like the idea of the moulding, but the way I sit, I can see the top edge of the deflector right about dead center up to down in my center rearview. Having a literal 'line' running across there might be an annoyance in my case, or worse yet, a potential blindspot. (bifocal mirror LOL)

Still, for a finished look, I can imagine it would have a nice effect.
 

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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Oh, as another 'noticed too late' moment from the cargo panel part of the install:

Using the holes furthest out on the arms/uprights on those two screws, wing nut it in place, drill for the second set of holes and repeate the screw-washer-washer-nut as done in the front holes.
Yeah, you're probably going to want to drill the second set of holes with the panel off, unless you're big on potentially boring a hole through the ECU or one of the relays.....
 

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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #33 · (Edited)
As you likely know anyway, it mounts directly to the cargo panel via screws coming up through where the outer 'scuff bars' were removed, and is held onto that with wing nuts.

Both seats can be independantly moved/reclined/tipped forward/whatever without effecting the screen or how it interacts with the other seat, but it is a bit better if both headrests at least just touch it to prevent wobble when at speeds over 65mph, and it just looks 'neater'. (except when tipping one or both the seats forward so the sun doesn't turn them into ham cookers while parked with the top down, in which case it then just looks neat :) )

Space-wise, a few 12 packs of your beverage of choice can still be dropped in behind the screen and it's mounting bars, and if neccisary, only takes about 30 seconds to remove and drop in the trunk.
 

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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Just remember to put a drop of locktite on the bolts-n-nuts that go throught the sheild to hold it to the bars. (it sucks when they unscrew themselves, the thing drops, and surprises the crap out of you)

I'm considering a few revisions that'll some features I'd like, such as a plexi lower panel and the ability to raise and lower the upper portion.
 

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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Obviously you weren't where the bugs are then :) (I swear, some nights I come home and have to clean them off with a ice scraper)

If you do yours according to the drawings on p1, the top will go up fine, but depending on seat angle, you might need to reach under the top and pull the screen forward a bit to clear the middle roof bar as it goes by. (not a big deal, and certainly nothing you'd have to take it out for)

Do you roll your windows up when at speed? It helps quite a bit with the stereo killing buffet noise.
 

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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Random answers in no particular order:

1) lexan will far exceed plexi for durability and shatter resistance (you can hit lexan with a hammer and it won't break)

Scratches and scuffs can be easily buffed out with the proper stuff. Gouges obviously cannot.

2) aluminum might not be stiff enough to stop the screen form flopping around in the wind. Do let us know if it does or doesn't please.

3) cutting either lexan or plexi can be accomplished with a jigsaw using a very fine metal cutting blade at slow reciprocating speeds, though it'll still likely melt itself back together right behind the blade. Having a few slivers of sheet metal to slip into the freshly cut groove can help alleviate that. Otherwise, just try to keep the cut slot open a bit until it cools.

4) rust on the frame gets touched up periodically. I'm more concerned about the rockers right now than the top frame truth be told.

5) lexan is the material of choice for replacing windows on race cars. NASCAR even uses it for windshields, but they do have those tear away layers to help protect it a bit. (plexi on the other hand is actually against the rules do to it's habit of shattering into large shards when impacted)
 

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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Aren't #6 machine screws gonna be too narrow to hold the pressure of wind on the Lexan?
They've been fine for the last couple years on mine.

Also, what length screws did you use?
That's dependant on how thick the stack of parts is.

If nothing else, go a little long and you can cut them to length.

If you've got a set of wire strippers/crimpers, they usually hve a spot at the pivot point where you can screw in small screws or bolts and cut them without messing up the threads.

barring that, figure the length you need, run a nut down on it a ways, then cut to length with a hacksaw. Take the nut back off and it'll clean the threads as it's removed.

I thought of adding lock washers, --do you think this is necessary?
No, but the flat washers are, and a drop of locktite on the nuts is pretty well a must. (you could go with urolock nuts, but the extra thickness they have put me off)

The thought I had in mind was to keep it all as thin/low profile as possible.

I even considered using aluminum screw rivets at one point, but didn't want to deal with trying to finesse them so they fit just so.

Finally, I thought of putting some strips of metal UNDER the cardboard rear deck, so as to sandwich the deck between two pieces of metal, -does the cardboard rear deck ever deform under the wind pressure, or is it strong enough to hold wind pressure?
It's quite strong enough as is, (it's pressboard, not cardboard), though fender washers on the back side are needed to prevent the screws from pulling through.

No reason you couldn't go with a strip of metal instead.
 

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1966-2013
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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Oooh, can't recall what size holes for the screws, but they were just big enough to let the screws pass through without binding.

No rubber under the steel washers. If the screwholes are small enough and the nuts tight enough there is no movement, thus no scratching.

Don't peel the protective 'skin' off that lexan til it's all said and done so no scratches get created during the work.
 
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