Alfa Romeo Forums banner
21 - 40 of 80 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
4,978 Posts
These dimensions I took from my S4 Spider might be helpful for you:

 
  • Like
Reactions: Dr. Lo

· Registered
'69 1750 Spider Veloce (Euro)
Joined
·
220 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
These dimensions I took from my S4 Spider might be helpful for you:

Any idea whether those dimensions would be the same for my S1 1969 1750 Spider Veloce ?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,978 Posts
Well, the wheelbase would be the same, which is your primary concern. The ground clearance is going to be a bit different, though.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dr. Lo

· Registered
Joined
·
4,978 Posts
is it very expensive to dig a pit?
Then, height clearance is irrelevent.
Dom, at least here in the US, it's generally much more expensive to excavate, form and pour concrete than to attack the wood framing above. If you work with a good framing carpenter, and do it right (building permit), then a garage ceiling can be altered in less than a week. Concrete needs 28 days to reach full strength.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Honestly the thing that worries me the most is an earthquake hitting while I'm under the car, lol. California life.
I'm just adding this, since the alarm just went off as I'm about to get under my (non-Alfa) car ...

To improve your odds, you can install a simple app (My Earthquake Alerts) on your iPhone to give you a few seconds of advance warning if anything happens. I arrived here in the SF bay area a little before the big one in 1989 and am still alive.

I have my app set to sound like a siren, and have it trigger based on magnitude and proximity so it does not become as useless as a car alarm. This last one was 94 miles away and 3.2 Richter, so I still get alerts enough to let me know the thing works.

So if I hear the siren go when I'm under the car, I could be out by the time any shaking would actually reach here. In theory. :ROFLMAO:
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
18,507 Posts
is it very expensive to dig a pit?
Then, height clearance is irrelevent.
Pits are horrible things. What happens if you spill something in it? What do you do with the wood that covers the hole when not in use, how do you get in to it, etc.

Rather have 4 commercial jack stands, not the type you buy at the local parts supply store but ones that professional mechanics use. They can raise much higher and are solid. I luckily have such things as my father kept his after closing/selling his shop. Note you need a commercial jack also otherwise won't lift car high enough in one lift.

Never thought of the earthquake risk ...
Pete
 

· Registered
Joined
·
11,701 Posts
ok, expensive they might be in the US.
but horrible they are certainly not if bult properly. I spent the first 20 years working from a pit, as our local Garage back then in England would rent it out on an hourly basis.

I am not talking about a big square hole in the ground :ROFLMAO:
Water Brickwork Building material Brick Composite material


I'm talking a modern Pit, with stairs, lighting, lined with tiles, and a sliding hydraulic lift....like every bus, lorry or train workshop has (I haven't yet seen a 4 poster for a train;))......but sort of a small version:
with the sliding lift you can get the wheels off the ground.
Light Infrastructure Yellow Flooring Floor


But ok, I agree, that is likely too much money for anyone other than a Mr. Leno;)
(oh and a better chance of survival in an earthquake too!)
 

· Registered
1987 Spider Graduate
Joined
·
16 Posts
I'm sure the QuickJack is a good option, but what I prefer is the Unijack, 2 ton bottle jack/jackstand combo unit. When in the lowest position, it fits under my Spider's jacking points, and is able to raise the car high enough for most of my needs. They are compact, lightweight and relatively inexpensive, especially when compared to the QuickJack. You can find them online at multiple retailers, but the least expensive I've seen is at Summit Racing - $67 each.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,348 Posts
I'm sure the QuickJack is a good option, but what I prefer is the Unijack, 2 ton bottle jack/jackstand combo unit. When in the lowest position, it fits under my Spider's jacking points, and is able to raise the car high enough for most of my needs. They are compact, lightweight and relatively inexpensive, especially when compared to the QuickJack. You can find them online at multiple retailers, but the least expensive I've seen is at Summit Racing - $67 each.
Those are convenient, but may not work for lowered cars.
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
18,507 Posts
Just had a look at the QuickJack. Looks tidy but I reckon I'd have my car up on jack stands in a similar time and the advantage of jack stands is more room around them AND you can use the jack for other things.

Of course I would love to have a hoist, but I cannot justify it, and my garage is a low ceiling and we have shelved the idea of moving (way tooooooooo much hassle)
Pete
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,348 Posts
Just had a look at the QuickJack. Looks tidy but I reckon I'd have my car up on jack stands in a similar time and the advantage of jack stands is more room around them AND you can use the jack for other things.

Of course I would love to have a hoist, but I cannot justify it, and my garage is a low ceiling and we have shelved the idea of moving (way tooooooooo much hassle)
Pete
The quick jack makes it easy to get the car up relatively high for jack stands. It can get the car about 2 feet off the ground (depending on the model). That can be done with jack stands, but it’s a bit of a process, and you need really tall ones. But if you just need the wheels off the ground, I agree jack stands are just as quick.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
821 Posts
I have a Quickjack 5000. The good: I find it a little quicker to set up than jack stands, and it feels more secure. I got mine from CostCo for a good price. The bad: I can't get direct access from the sides of the car, but am getting pretty good at creepering in under the rear axle or the through the front wheel wells. And I have a Giulia sedan so the 5000 is just barely long enough to span both jack points -- I modified the front rubber blocks so they can sit a little further forward. I wouldn't think that would be an issue with a spider or GTV, but check the specs against your car's dimensions.
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
18,507 Posts
The quick jack makes it easy to get the car up relatively high for jack stands. It can get the car about 2 feet off the ground (depending on the model). That can be done with jack stands, but it’s a bit of a process, and you need really tall ones. But if you just need the wheels off the ground, I agree jack stands are just as quick.
Yeah I have professional jack stands that can be so tall the underneath of the car is too far away from me lying on a creeper. I also have a professional jack that can lift that high in one lift. I was going to say worth buying IMO, but I didn't I was given them by my father

Pete
 

· Premium Member
1986 Spider Graduate
Joined
·
228 Posts
I purchased lift ramps to make it easier to work on my cars. My garage is too low for a two or four post lift and the lift ramps are about 1/3 the cost of the Quick Jack unit. https://www.discountramps.com/automo.../CARLIFT-3000/

They lift ramps are made very well wilth good welds, properly fitting hardware, and a heavy paint coat. The hydraulics work smoothly but I did have to top up the fluid (recommended in the instructions). The ramps must be bolted down (holes provided) as they will slide on concrete when attempting to drive up the ramps. I used 1/2" inserts for concrete that were threaded for 3/8" bolts. The inserts are set just below the concrete level so when not in use the ramps can be unbolted and removed leaving a smooth surface. Driving up the ramps was no problem and the ramps' safety catch stopped the car with the tires square on the lift surface. The hydraulic pump lifted the car evenly and was not difficult to operate. When at the highest point, the lift safety locks fell into place.With the locks in place I lowered the lift surfaces slightly to relieve the pump of pressure while working on the car. Lowering the lifts was controlled by two knobs on the pump. Lowering was well controlled. The lifts raised the wheels 15" above the floor giving 35" of lift at the front of the car and plenty of room to work under the car. Backing onto the ramps is no problem and gives the same undercar space. If working on brakes or suspension jack stands can be placed and the lift platforms lowered to remove the wheels. The hydraulic lift ramps have met my needs and I am pleased with their operation.
These lift ramps have worked well for me. I looked at the Quick Jacks but I want to do some clean-up work along the underside of the rocker panels and replace fuel lines, etc. and the Quick Jacks would interfere with that.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Hood
 
21 - 40 of 80 Posts
Top