Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings:

I KNOW how popular this question is.
And I know it is impossible to answer.
And I know that someone will answer "It Is Worth Whatever Someone Is Willing To Pay".
But I am looking for a general guideline here . . . .
SO: Here it is:
If I find an early 70's spider with 100K, running, with sound body and frame, not in need of paint, no major issues . . . . How much should I expect to pay?

OR, put another way: If I found that car for around $3000.00 would I be doing OK? (I think that the answer is "YES" but I am not yet convinced.)

I have been tracking a bunch of spiders on ebay and it looks like there is NO predictable pattern to the pricing of these cars! Many ebay sellers set the reserve so high that most of the listed cars do not sell. I wonder if this is case with all cars (or items) sold on ebay or is this specific to Alfa Spiders? Why would the sellers of Spiders consistently believe that the value of these cars is higher than the buying public is willing to pay? It just don't make no sense!

Thanks for the feedback!

Rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,267 Posts
Probably.....

Gotta know the market you are in.
How in-depth has your study been? What do you mean by " no major issues"?
Even if you had to spend $5k on the engine/trans/drive, if the body is in great shape you would have an pretty nice car (probably) for $8k, which would be a good buy (in my mind) if you are talking about a pre-75 type Spider.
You're right, you're like to get a bunch of comments.:D
 

·
1966-2013
Joined
·
13,741 Posts
I've got a much more simplistic approach: What is it worth to you?

If you're going to try and pick something up on the cheap just to turn it around in a hurry to roll a quick profit on it is one thing, if you can spot a deal so you don't get hosed on a keeper is another, or, if you don't mind paying top dollar under the assumption that more $$ = better end product then it's another thing yet.

Decide what you want out of it and what you may or may not be willing to do or sacrifice to get the end result you desire regardless of what a 'market' seems to say you should.

Patience for what you want at the price you want to pay will eventually yeild the result you're after. Impulse purchase will just cost you a lot of dosh or get you a lot of headache, or both.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,087 Posts
If you found an early '70s Spider with sound body (no rust), good paint and no major issues for $3k, you are either buying it from someone who doesn't know the Spider market, or from an unscrupulous buyer who has covered the car's flaws, or you have no idea what you are looking at, and therefore think that things are ok, when they are not.

In general you do really get what you pay for. Most cars that look decent are just used cars, which means that they are far from perfect. (There is nothing wrong in having a used car - that's what most of our cars are, and they are a joy to drive.) It costs much more to fix things in a car, than to buy one that is already good. You will often hear people say about the price of fixing something (one thing) on their relatively new-used Spider: "but that's more than I spent for the whole car". Well, that's why many things in a car are just not fixed or refurbished. My "favorite" is the infamous second gear crunch. I see descriptions that state how a car is original, well-cared for, etc., etc. but has a second gear crunch and how these cars are known for weak synchros. No where in the description does it say that the car is 33 years old and the transmission has never been opened because it costs $1500 to $3500 to do so, so it's not that the owner doesn't want to spend the money on maintenance, but it's a design flaw. If you replace the synchros, and shift properly, you can go 20+ years without a synchro issue. (My '74 Spider, by the way, has never had it's transmission opened, and there is no crunch in any gear. I really don't think that it is the only Spider with "strong" synchros.)

Spiders up to 1974 were free of smog equipment, and in stock form are faster than all Spiders that came later. Furthermore, they are historical, and even within the "older than 25 years" historical status, there is an unofficial "pecking order". You will find many events that are limited to pre-1975 automobiles. Rather than repeat some of these points, let me offer you a post that I wrote, "A comment that may be helpful when considering the Spider market", as part of the discussion in the thread titled "Buying a Spider".

Best regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,068 Posts
I bought a 74 spider that was driveable , but neede work. the transmission shifted bad, the top ws shot, there was a viberation and thumping in the drivetrain, and generaly run down.
After changing to the right (almost) transmission fluid, a new top, rebuilding the driveline, new hoses, fuel pump, carb rebuild, and wireing repairs, all done while still driving (and smiling), all that is left is to fix some rust and repaint.
enjoy what you can when you can.
cliff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,051 Posts
Depends on what you want to do with the car.

If you find a 70's Spider for $3000 and want to complete a frame up restoration for a show car, make sure the body has little or no rust. You can buy almost all the mechanical and interior parts and install yourself or pay big money to someone else.

It seems these cars attract two main types of people- those who appreciate the ahead-of-its-time engineering and want to restore, maintain the cars themselves, and those who want/wishing/hoping the cars become worth what a mint 1970 SS Chevelle is now worth.

If you are like me- drive the car often, work on it mainly yourself, willing to learn the quirks the car has (there are many), then buy the $3000 car and pour a few thousand dollars into it and do the job yourself. Or, lurk the internet, local papers/advertisements and pay many thousands more for the car to sit at car shows or in your garage. You can also hope that you find an old lady whose husband just died and left a classic mint condition Alfa in the garage that she is willing to sell for a fraction of its worth.

I bought my 1986 Graduate for $2500 from a guy who was terminally ill. The car had 111K miles on the odometer, needed a radiator repair and a clutch master cylinder. I drive the car almost everyday, and I drive it hard. I've also poured/perused the manuals, books, this website. I recently had to replace the exhaust cam because of a bad lobe, but blame that on myself since I hadn't checked the valve clearances in over two years and drive a 600+ mile roundtrip once a month.

Buy it to drive it, or buy it as an investment. Either way you'll have an exotic sportscar for a fraction of what other exotic cars cost.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top