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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does any know if there is a soft rubber seal between the yoke and the rear driveshaft coupling on a late style rear Alfetta driveshaft coupling, i.e. it would slide over the tip coming out of the yoke that engages into the driveshaft coupling and then get compressed as the bolts holding the rear driveshaft coupling to the yoke are tightened? This is on a Milano race car running Alfetta parts, but I don't have an Alfetta manual. The Milano rear driveshaft setup has it, and I suspect the Alfetta does as well. An Alfetta parts manual or a Haynes workshop manual will likely show it, or anyone familiar with late style Alfettas will know.
Thanks,
Jes
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·

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Looking in an Alfetta spare parts catalog did not clearly show a seal as described. I don't recall there being a seal on my car during donut time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info. Can anyone else confirm the absence of a seal?
Jes
 

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There is a small rubber seal that sits on the end of the prop shaft where it locates into the coupling (or is it on the yoke?). I'm not sure it does that much. Just use a thin slice of rubber that fits, like half a grommet. It's fine.
 

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Jes, based on limited experience, I have not seen a seal where you have indicated (between the front face of the TA yoke nut and the rear face of the rear giubo). There is a spare shaft in the garage that I just took a better look at and the rear face of the rear giubo does have a thin rubber coating on it however. From your question, I decided to take a better look at the Spares Catalog (#2462). It shows several parts (9?, 15?) and a design that I'm not familar with. The two or three Alfetta shafts that I have seen look as shown in the Haynes manual.

That all said however, several of us with Alfettas have a problem with the propeller shaft being too short by about 1/4" or so that puts a real strain on the giubos as you might imagine. Still searching for the reason for this. No pinch bolt on Alfettas and the short shaft problem is with the transaxle shifted as far forward in its mounts as possible. Perhaps this missing(?) seal you mentioned might be part of the solution. Or maybe not.:p
Best guess today is a difference in today's giubo flange thickness.
 

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There is no seal between the yoke and the guibo. The tip of the input shaft should fit snugly into the guibo. Since the input shaft yoke does not move relative to that part of the guibo, a rubber seal isn't required. There is a rubber seal on the forward facing side of the guibo. That one severs to keep our debris as the drive shaft moves relative to the guibo. I hope that makes sense.

The parts book does not show a seal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks all for the thoughts. No seal it is.
Jes
 

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Might be the clutch schematics you need to look at. There is sometimes a small rubber seal/ring that sits on the input shaft in front of the nut that holds the yolk on. Like I said I don't think it does much.
 

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The blow-ups posted seem to have more parts than the one I have. In the front section there is listed a seal on both ends and the back section shows a "rubber pad". If Alfa put it there, I'd leave it. Must be a reason - take-up slack, vibration mitigation? Also, if there's no pinch bolt/collar, it could be important.
 

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Is that what causes this? It isn't normal is it? Looks kind of stressed.
I have encountered this as well on my Alfetta race car. What I discovered was the centering bushing on the trans side of the rear giubo was .02 mm smaller in diameter than the clutch flywheel shaft.The giubo in question was a Malo Akron 59006AGES. A little work with a drill press and small grinding stone made it fit with a firm push by hand and now all is well.
 

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This can also be caused by the transaxle position due to broken mounts, or imp oper positioning. Many use the trick of lowering the nose of the t-axle to make driveline removal easier. When finishing up a driveline job, I install the trans axle cross member but leave the bolts slightly loose. Then loosen the single rear mount and force the trans as far forward at tolerances allow and tighten all hardware. The alignment is usually alot better, and the rear flex disk much less stressed.
 
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