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"Having read a bit more it seems the car must locate the keyless start fob inside the car before it will accept a command to start the engine by pressing the start button"

Nice thought, but not true, at least with the Chevy SS, don't know about other makes. I can set the remote outside the car a little ways away, and then get in the car and start it nicely.

"I don't think they actually work"

Watched a video where two guys did just that.
 

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Actually, watching a video tells you nothing. Forest Gump is instructive in that regard.

As for your Australian Chevy somebody made a big mistake encoding the software for your fob.

This is how Chevy thinks it works:

 

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chiuso per ferie
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From driving cars with such fobs. If the car will start when the fob is more than a couple of feet from the steering wheel then that manufacturer is unnecessarily using inadequate technology. No car so equipped that I have driven will allow the engine to start unless the fob is pretty close to the steering wheel. Certainly filling the gas tank with the fob in your pocket is far enough away.
You are generalizing as you usually do. You do not own an modern Alfa Romeo, so you really don't have any experience with one.

I can start my car with the key fob 6 feet away. That does not mean that all modern cars behave in that same way. Until you have actual data on how an Alfa Romeo key fob works, you are only speculating.
 

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Properly written keyless start requires that the fob be inside the car before the start button will start the car. All other variations are defective.

Keyless entry and remote start are different technologies.

I have driven the modern Giulia several times.
 

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Well, ok, we all have our own experiences. Regardless of what you read, in real life we know what can happen, based on our own tests. Defective software or not (indeed, what software is NOT defective one way or another). It's life.

"Actually, watching a video tells you nothing. Forest Gump is instructive in that regard".

Somewhat dismissive, eh?
 

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Well, ok, we all have our own experiences. Regardless of what you read, in real life we know what can happen, based on our own tests. Defective software or not (indeed, what software is NOT defective one way or another). It's life.

"Actually, watching a video tells you nothing. Forest Gump is instructive in that regard".

Somewhat dismissive, eh?
Not at all. My profession gives me insight on what is reliable evidence and what is not. The posted link shows that GM is apparently under the illusion that their keyless start cars will not start unless the fob is inside the car.
 

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I personally don't care what GM, or Fiat/Alfa, or whomever thinks what happens with these fobs, I'm more interested about what really does happen, occurrences which can be at least reasonably verified. If I or others can set their fobs somewhere outside the car and then get in and start it, good enough evidence for me.

And maybe you think GM or others didn't check for that? I suspect they did, but they will tell the buying public whatever they think will help sell the car. I would imagine many potential buyers don't want to hear that the fob needn't be inside the car in order to start it when pushing the start button on the dash.
 

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1972 Montreal. 2019 Giulia ti Sport
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Discussion Starter #28
Well thank you all for your replies. I worked out a deal with the dealer, key fob included.

As far as the worries of a keyless entry/remote start fob, I have owned 2015 Ford Fusion with keyless entry, push button and remote start since fall of 2016. Zero issues. After using remote start, you need to press the start button in the car before you can shift out of park or move the steering wheel. The start button in the car will only work when the key is very close to the steering wheel. As far as getting it wet, I once went swimming with it in my swim suit pocket, without realizing it was there. I discovered it about a minute after getting in the water. I left it in the sun for a while. It works, and it seems no worse for the wear.
 

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Water in these printed circuit board devices only causes a problem if the water conducts electricity to where it isn't wanted. The operating voltage is around 3 volts and very low currents are involved. It is unlikely that water will cause a short circuit. Still, if I got one wet I'd open it up and remove the battery before allowing it to dry in the open air. Rice or desiccant would be unnecessary.

And as I say just because Chevy can't write correct software for their keyless start fobs doesn't make all keyless start fobs inadequate. My Jaguar will not recognize the keyless start feature unless the fob is inside the car reasonably close to the driver's position. No accessory feature and certainly no start.
 

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"And as I say just because Chevy can't write correct software for their keyless start fobs doesn't make all keyless start fobs inadequate"

Assuming one thinks their software is faulty, lol? If someone is worried about the car being stolen by someone as you stand nearby, a key, removed when you get out, instead prevents that.

I still see no advantages to having a fob such as these, since the only thing I truly need it for is to carry it in order to start the car. I can do that with a key, which BTW doesn't require a battery, and doesn't cost an arm and a leg if lost. Simple keys do wondrous things, such open or lock the doors, open the trunk, and even start the car, just what I need it to do. And, incredibly, the fob comes with a key as well, however I cannot start the car with it, alas. Jeez.
 

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Well, we finally did it. Just agreed to buy a 2019 Giulia ti Sport. We love the car, and hope it gives us many years of smiles. However, the dealer (non-Alfa Chrysler-Jeep dealer) only had one key fob with the car. I know that they can be expensive. Has anyone here purchased one? I saw some on eBay, and they were less than $100. Just not sure if I'd be getting the real thing or a knock-off. The nearest Alfa dealer is over an hour away from me.
I've been down the same path. A new fob will cost around $250, the hard key is just under $200, and the programming is around $150. The keys advertised on Ebay are locked out, meaning they are programmed to another Giulia. They can be unlocked by the dealer if they happen to have the car, which of course they don't. Alfa has the software really locked down, when a fob is reprogrammed it is over the internet using the software at a single location. The software has never been available to a dealer anywhere so no one has the opportunity to reverse engineer the code. The main controller chip is available from a European company unprogrammed. If you wanted to try to remove the surface mounted chip from the fob circuit board and resolder the new one, you could then have a dealer program it. The cost of the chip is around 30 euro. You can order hard key blanks on Ebay (I have extras) and take them to a locksmith and get a copy made from your existing key. It cost me $35 to have a copy made. The head of the key has to be ground down on one side to fit in the fob. Not a big deal to grind it. So the bottom line is you can save a little over $100 by getting a blank hard key and make a copy. It is not very practical to try to shortcut the fob.
 
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