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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys,

I am finally putting together the list of stuff I want to do with the Junior Z, given the collapsed headliner and I am inclined to go big and address all the things that bugged me since I got the car back in 2005:
  • Windshield - get scratches out or get a new one (In progress)
  • Crack in dash and in the plastic piece with the windshield vents
  • Re-paint hood and valance over wipers due to emerging paint stress cracks (Those developed in the past 10 years under my ownership. Not big, but also not a big thing to address so why not while I am at it?)

On the dash, I absolutely, positively do not want to go the "upholstery route". On the later 1600, the dash is one foam piece. As such you see a lot of restorations that upholster the dash in vinyl or leather with the associated super ugly seams and material.

Some are big fans of LA's Just Dashes and their approach with heat shrink factory correct materials. They do wonders for other Alfas of that vintage but I wonder if any of you has experience with a what I would think is a difficult piece on the Junior Z?

Thanks,

Mike
 

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Hi, Mike. I noticed that there is a windshield scratch remover that is apparently useful on deep scratches. The problem with the generic scratch removers is that they're basically polishes and are the very devil to use on real scratches. I haven't tried this new product but, if it works reasonably well, it might be worth a try. Also, Permatex makes a crack repair that ought to work. I tried it once on my GTV and wasn't happy with the results. But, then, I saw a professional job done by a guy who works for used car lots and was impressed with his results. I haven't given up on the Permatex product despite not having much luck using it. You might search around and see if the car-lot guys are still around. If you have to replace the dash anyway, it wouldn't hurt to have one of those guys give it a try. If it doesn't work you can always send it to Just-Dashes or, maybe, find a good replacement dash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Jim. The dashes are one of the bigger headaches on the 1600 as it is unique to the car, a rather complex piece and with 400 cars made, replacements are impossible to get. In fact, I have never ever seen one anywhere for sale.

So we see how it will turn out but the fun begins now.
 

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I had just dashboards estimate my 1600 dash. They wanted 2500 to re-do it. The plastic section in mine is now aluminium. I made a new one and re-used the vents from the plastic. I epoxied them in to a square cutout in the new item. In the end, I had vinyl stretched over both pieces. It looks great.
Brian found a guy in Italy re-manufacturing the center console stainless steel. I finally got it all installed and re-done last week.
The next project is new turn signal unit. Mine are corroded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for this - do you recall the process that Just Dashes would have applied to the dash? I can imagine that they would estimate that $-amount, given the dash is actually quite complex.

Mike
 

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Looks wonderful!
Do you worry the center console stainless steel will be too reflective? It looks great but I would worry about scratches and reflections.
 

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Mbaum,
Search "vacuum forming dash" on YouTube and you will see some remarkable results on complex dash shapes using that process, with no unwanted seams.
I don't know if JustDashes uses vacuum forming, but I would strongly suspect that they would.
 

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Looks wonderful!
Do you worry the center console stainless steel will be too reflective? It looks great but I would worry about scratches and reflections.
I don't drive the Zagato very often, so I'll wear sunglasses
 

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Vacuum forming

Yes, precisely- they suck the air out from underneath the vinyl sheet to make it precisely follow the contours of the dash, while the glue then keeps it there. They pre-heat the vinyl to make it more pliable - hence the presenter's description of 'thermo vacuum forming'.
It works equally well on sunken, round gauge clusters etc., like ours. On some of those Youtube videos I mentioned plenty of people have made their own forming devices - usually for smaller jobs, of course - but it's only a matter of scale. It was interesting to watch a couple of those to see how simple the idea is, and how well it worked. Add DIY to your search phrase to find a couple of those.
 
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