Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Got in the car (87 Spider Veloce) yesterday morning to drive to work. Turned the key and engine cranked strongly (I put a new battery in last weekend) but did not catch. The car has run well since I bought it over a year ago. Replaced the spark plug wires, distributor cap and rotor earlier this summer. Usual oil changes. The car has been very reliable.

The car had not been driven for a couple of days when yesterday's problem occurred. After a few tries I finally gave up for the morning and took my truck to the office. Got home around 6:30 pm and went to take another look fully expecting that I had a fuel pump problem or something like that and voila, first turn of the key she roars to life.

My question is this: Are these cars subject to condensation in the distributer? It has been rather humid around here and has cooled off into the 60's at night. My car is garaged so I wouldn't think it would be an issue. How about flooding? Is it possible to flood a fuel injected car?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
16,652 Posts
The car had not been driven for a couple of days...
It was pouting. And 'punishing' you. It IS Italian, remember... :D


Is it possible to flood a fuel injected car?
It should not 'flood'. The CSI (Cold Start Injector) should only squirt for a few seconds until the TTS (Thermo Time Switch) warms up and cuts off the CSI. After that the ECU (computer) should supply a slightly richer mixture until the CTS (Coolant Temp Sensor) indicates the engine has warmed up and the O2 sensor begins to supply a valid signal for the ECU to go into 'closed loop' mode.

See my sig block for a link to the Spider L-jet diagnosis page. But it can be hard to find intermittant problems...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Eric. Boy..I hope she's not pouting! I spend money on her, keep her polished and treat her real nice. I hate intermittent problems! :mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
When you're going through Eric's excellent L-Jet Diagnostics, check the condition of the Bosch AMP plugs that are used with the various sensors. The yahoo that worked on my Spider for the PO managed to damage all of them and outright destroy some of them. I found these damaged plugs to be the source of some intermittent problems with starting my car - especially the ones connected to the temperature sensor and the thermo time switch.

I have observed two major failure modes:

1. The plug slips off of the sensor just enough to loose contact but not enough to be noticeably unplugged. This is usually due to the absence of the little wire bale that holds the plug onto the sensor. These go missing when the aforementioned yahoo couldn't be bothered with (or wasn't capable of) the finesse these plugs require for removal. If the wire bale is missing, check that the plug is connected by trying to push it onto the sensor.

2. The wires leading into the AMP plug are pulled back far enough that the little metal ends that reside inside the plug no longer contact the pins in the sensor socket. This can be a real stumper since the plug looks and feels connected. The loose wires will be hidden by the rubber boot on the back of the plug, but usually will push back in so that contact will be made with the pins.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,506 Posts
You forgot iffy crank pickups. I had an iffy pickup on my son's '86 Spider. It would start if the ambient temp was above about 40F, but not below. Check the resistance. It should be about 1,000 ohm. Ours read about 1,000,000 ohms but gave sufficient signal at warm temps. Probably in this case, it was thermal expansion making up the connections enough to function, with cold weather contracting to open the ground reference.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top