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Discussion Starter #1
I've been enjoying jazz for a long time. Anyone finishing high school in the mid 1950s would have grown up with a lot of swing music on most radio stations.

The period I like is from the early stuff, such as performed by Ellington and Armstrong out to some of the modern jazz as exampled by Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan, and Modern Jazz Quartet.

Ironically, I thought I knew a lot about the early period with Armstrong and his "Hot Five". But there is one tune I missed, and this is the reason for this post.

In following the Ken Burns documentary on jazz of a few years ago, which was outstanding, I picked up on the mention of probably the best three-minute composition of a tune. It was "West End Blues", and I thought "never heard of it".

But the name stayed in my mind, but I wasn't motivated enough to go and find the CD.

Then, early this year I discovered how to download selections from iTunes on my Mac. Well, there is a whole world out there and as part of a growing library of music I downloaded Armstrong's 1928 recording of West End Blues and it is amazing.

Don't know how I could have missed it and now have two different recordings by him:):):) as well as 2 by two other groups.:)
 

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Love jazz, used to buy CD's from Jazz Heritage Society an outfit in NJ (they have a more well known classical division). Have several of the Armstromg Hot Fives. A Few of my Favorites:
Mikes Davis: Kinda Blue

Dave Brubek: Time Out

Ellington: Live At Newport; Black, Brown & Beige; Four Symphonic Works; and really cool double CD: Live at Fargo, this album is digitally remastered from acetates made as part of a local live radio broadcast from a dancehall concert by Ellington and his band in Fargo ND 1940! The sound is clarity is amazing, real time capsule
 

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my all time favorite:
Oscar Peterson, Exclusively for my friends Vol 3: The Way I really play
 

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Gotta Bunch

My humble collection of CD's include:

Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong
Art Blakey The Freedom Rider
Clifford Brown & Max Roach At Basin Street
Dave Brubeck Time Out
Cab Calloway Forever Gold
John Coltrane Ken Burns Jazz
Chick Corea The Best of
Miles Davis Kind of Blue, Steamin
Charles Mingus The Very Best of
Hank Mobley No Room For Squares
Thelonious Monk w/ John Coltrane At Carnegie Hall
Thelonious Monk Underground A favorite!
Lee Morgan Standards
Fats Navarro Timeless
Oliver Nelson The Blues and the Abstract Truth
Charlie Parker Round Midnight
Sonny Rollins Compilation

Love 'em all. I can listen to them hours on end. I also consider Steeley Dan and some solo Donald Fagen as Jazz, or Jazz like. I have almost the entire collection, and enjoy listening to that also.
 

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In following the Ken Burns documentary on jazz of a few years ago, which was outstanding, I picked up on the mention of probably the best three-minute composition of a tune. It was "West End Blues", and I thought "never heard of it".

But the name stayed in my mind, but I wasn't motivated enough to go and find the CD.

Then, early this year I discovered how to download selections from iTunes on my Mac. Well, there is a whole world out there and as part of a growing library of music I downloaded Armstrong's 1928 recording of West End Blues and it is amazing.
I have that copy of Ken Burns Jazz, called The Best of Ken Burns Jazz Unless the series had more than one volume, Armstrong's West End Blues is not included on the copy I have.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Maybe it was played on the broadcast, and it is interesting that it was not included in the CD collection.

Until I actually listened to it the name and the tune was just a vague recollection.
 

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Maybe it was played on the broadcast, and it is interesting that it was not included in the CD collection.

Until I actually listened to it the name and the tune was just a vague recollection.
Yes, you are right. They certainly played more than just the 20 tracks on my CD during the PBS broadcast. Now that I think of it, they may have had it on the Louis Armstrong collection from the series. i only have the Best of Ken Burns Jazz and John Coltrane's collection from the series. I agree, that was an excellent broadcast.
 

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I like all of it, from dixieland to experimental, although a little bit of Ornette goes a long way. The stuff I can listen to all day is mostly from the "cool" era: Brubeck, Getz, Miles, Coltrane.

Who is this Ken Burns cat and what does he blow?;) (Just kidding)

Bill
Selmer MKVII alto, Buffet Super-Dynaction tenor, 1926 Buescher soprano:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Love jazz, used to buy CD's from Jazz Heritage Society an outfit in NJ (they have a more well known classical division). Have several of the Armstromg Hot Fives. A Few of my Favorites:
Mikes Davis: Kinda Blue

Dave Brubek: Time Out

Ellington: Live At Newport; Black, Brown & Beige; Four Symphonic Works; and really cool double CD: Live at Fargo, this album is digitally remastered from

I Attended two Ellington concerts, one of which was a dance in about 1956

Did a big number on Diminuendo and Creschendo In Blue with the long alto solo by Paul Gonsalves --Just like at Newport, but without Jo Jones at the side of the band stand.

Got Ellington's signature on my LP album--still have it./QUOTE]
 

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I like minimalist jazz from the middle 60's. I'm a guitar player so my favorites from that period are Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, Charlie Bird, and Jim Hall. Of these, Jim Hall is the guy I listen to the most. Minimalist in the extreme, his every-note-in-its-place style has a luninosity that makes his music unique. For me, one of his best pieces is "All Across The City" which is on the "Storyteller" CD from Concord. Reportedly, he wrote All Accross The City after a late, late set in NYC. I think it perfectly catches the sense of stillness of early morning hours.
 

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Jazz fan here

Hello,
Very excited to hear there are some jazz fans here on the forum. (After all we ALL have good taste and DO NOT follow popular tastes and pop culture!!!!).
I am a college music professor and a professional Jazz bass player. Though I tend to specialize in the Jazz fusion era (as a bass player). Jaco Pastorius is my favorite bass player. I have done graduate research on his life and music. This is mostly due to me being an electric bass now (due to work reasons) and specializing on the fretless bass (keeps me rooted to my training as an upright bass player...)
Though I do not claim to be an authority on the subject of Jazz... I have taught the Jazz history course and I have lots of resources. Ken Burns did a decent job but he was extremely partial to African-American Jazz. He completely disregarded Latin Jazz (Tito Puente? Dizzie Gillespie and Chano Pozo in the late 40's? and many more... And he also disregarded the entire Jazz fusion era!).
Then again he also insulted so many Jazz players in his statement towards the end of the last chapter. He stated that in the 80's Jazz "went away". There were no more Jazz clubs, and most musicians stopped performing Jazz... Then out of nowhere comes Winton Marsallis and he single-handedly "revived" Jazz and inspired a whole legion of Jazz players to return to Jazz!!!! Of course we saw the end credits that stated that Winton was one of the producers and consultants to the documentary!!!!
To his credit he really burns on that trumpet!
But he certainly did not "save" Jazz!
An absolute insult to all the Jazz greats who were touring, recording, and playing their "butts off" during the late 70's and 80's!!!!!!
Ken Burn's documentary is worth gold in that has real footage of the performers, it regards Louis Armstrong as the father of Jazz, features him in every episode, and it is the most complete and historically accurate documentary we have on America's art music and America's only contribution to the Arts.
I have a dream that one day every college student will be required to take a Jazz Appreciation course as part of their general education requirements.
Until then, I have to comfort myself with my 1991 164 S.
Thanks for starting a thread on Jazz!

1991 ALfa 164 S
2002 VW Eurovan (family and gig mobile)
1987 BMW 325i (lives in LA Union Station)
 

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Trad Jazz baby

Back from the days of downbeat mag;

Sonny Rollins Way out West (the new CD release is awesome)
Rahsaan Roland Kirk- Case of the 3 sided dream in audio color (classic Kirk), also try his live recordings they are a blast
Any Miles Davis
Any Charlie Parker
Any Coltrane
Sun Ra!
Billie Holliday (Lady Day)

Sax, piano, bass, drum kit--- awesome

For more modern, and loud, try Tower of Power (mind blowing at volume)

And don;t forget the blues!
 

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Just downloaded Jim Hall's rendition of "In A Sentimental Mood"

Nice stuff--thanks for the intro....:)

I'm glad you like him. His music always puts me in the mood for a good single-malt Scotch, a fireplace, my favorite girl, and the quiet of a midnite snow. Alas, I have the whiskey, the fireplace, and the girl (40 years now), but I still have to work on the midnight snow. :)

Oh, yeah. You might see if you can d/load "I Can't Get Started". Like All Accross The City, it's Jim Hall at his best.
 

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I like minimalist jazz from the middle 60's. I'm a guitar player so my favorites from that period are Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, Charlie Bird, and Jim Hall. Of these, Jim Hall is the guy I listen to the most. Minimalist in the extreme, his every-note-in-its-place style has a luninosity that makes his music unique. For me, one of his best pieces is "All Across The City" which is on the "Storyteller" CD from Concord. Reportedly, he wrote All Accross The City after a late, late set in NYC. I think it perfectly catches the sense of stillness of early morning hours.
Speaking of minimilism on the guitar...are you familiar with John Abercromie
or Tejre Rypdal ? Very sweet [to my ears anyhow).I grew up in a jazz house.
My father and uncles were professional musicians and from the '50's onward
I had the great pleasure of meeting MANY of the jazz greats when they blew through town. George Benson, Joe Pass, Count Basie,Wes Montgomery,
Grant Green, Buddy Rich,...on and on....would stop-by and 'chat' and play
eat and drink, laugh and tell stories..Way cool!!!!!!!!!! Now most of that
generation (inclding my father and uncles) are long-gone. Oh how I miss
that. Everytime I play their stuff; I have visuals to go along with it........
......Ed K.:cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool:
 

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Did some cat say Eric Dolphy?:D

Jazz lover from waaaaaayback, here! Grew up in Montreal, where Jazz was, is and ever-shall-be happening!

There was a club called The Rising Sun, where I got to see Oscar Peterson, Rhassan Roland Kirk, Dave Brubeck (all Canadians) and others like Miles, Hancock, Ponty and many more played for small, but very appreciative audiences. Charlie Biddle also ran a great Jazz club there. Nowadays, they hold one of the largest (if not THE largest) jazz festivals every summer. That, lots of Alfas and a Formula One Race!!!!!! Now THAT was a great place to grow up!

These days I have a pretty extensive collection of CDs, though I sold all my old vinyl about five years ago.

By the way, for Kirk fans: "Sleep...yeah, dream!! You don't want me to sleep! We the ones been wakin up da world!...Saw a woman once makin love to a computer!!...Couldn't get no satisfaction!"
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Nice story on your visitors.

" I Can't Get Started" -- I would like to have the original 12-inch 78.

Not to play it but to hang it on the wall in my "study".

My iTunes library amounts to 1235 tunes of different classifications, with 238 under Jazz.

A lot of the Basie and Ellington were downloaded from CDs, some of the music is from CDs borrowed from the public library, and the rest from the iTunes Store.

Browsing through the latter discovers some otherwise "unobtainables", like some of the old standards such as "Autumn In New York" by Lawrence Brown, who played trombone with Ellington.

Similarly, I found more of the ballads done by Webster, Hodges, Edison, and Chet Baker.

Even a novelty piece, "Open The Door Richard" smokes along on the Basie beat, with Edison doing the "vocal".

To have found this stuff through CDs would have taken ages, and then there is the waste of in some cases only downloading one or two tunes from an album.

My iTunes habit is now down to only a few dollars a day:)
 

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" I Can't Get Started" -- I would like to have the original 12-inch 78.

Not to play it but to hang it on the wall in my "study".

Subtle:

I have the LP . . . somewhere. . . :) Although I don't want to part with the LP, I'll be happy to take a photo of the cover to send to you. You could massage it in photoshop and then print out a great album sized print for framing. Finding the LP will take awhile, but when I come across it I'll set it aside, take the photo and them PM you, if you want.
 

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"won ton - and it ain't gonna get no heavier":eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:
"there ain't no 'lectricity in the jugle":cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool:
....Rhassan Roland Kirk:):)
............................................Ed K
 

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I have the good fortune to live close to Monterey, California, and have attended the Monterey Jazz Festival for the past two years. Each outing is a learning experience, especially for a Jazz newbie like me. The Festival's showcased a number of up-and-comers, and all-time greats as well, which allows me to compare many different eras of jazz. We had Kurt Elling doing vocals two years back, as well as Roy Hargrove strutting his stuff on the trumpet, mixed in with Dave Brubeck doing his Take-Five and Sonny Rollins dancing with this sax on the stage. Clint Eastwood even did a little number on the piano (yeah the actor, the ex-Mayor of Carmel, CA). John Scofield was also a participant, who followed up with a solo performance at a local jazz club. Winton Marsalis is next on the list at the club.

I've got lots to learn! Glad I found this thread.
 
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