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Discussion Starter #1
i'd like to think that it is but i can't do fiberglass repairs (right now anyway)

the photos were taken with my phone so the quality isn't the best, but the hardtop is cracking and exposing the fiberglass underneath it.

there's also these hairline cracks coming from the dynaplastics badge
 

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If this is something you really like, then you should take it to an experience fiberglass expert.

Alternatively, I see hardtops online every so often. Not sure if your Alfa is garaged, if so, a nice soft top should work during the time that it is driven.
 

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Somewhat fixable but it will never be same as new. Use fiberglass resin mix only, no fiberglass matt or cloth as there is no where to put it. Remove the hardtop to a set of saw horses or a work surface. Cover any work surface exposed to the resin with waxed paper. Get this at the grocery store. Double or tripple layer any waxed paper application. Read up on the resin mixture and determine your work time before the resin hardens. This will be something on the order of 15 or 20 minutes. Apply the resin mix with a small paint brush, working it into the available exposed spaces as well as possible. Wrap the edge with waxed paper and use a series of 3 C clamps starting 4 or 5 inches above the rivet and pull everything back down into place with the C clamps. Do a dry run practice on this C clamp work first to determine how best to apply and secure the C clamps. You may need to use a board behind the inside lip of the window opening to get something for the C clamps to secure against. Apply and remove the C clamps from the top down. Don't bother removing the rivet as it will no longer be doing you any good and can stay in for apprearance sake. Pull everythind back into place with the C clamps and leave it for a couple of days.

Remove the C clamps from the top down and see how much success you have achieved. This will be determined by how well everything stays in place and how much if any tries to pull back apart as you remove the C clamps. If the aluminum trim rail stays in place then you will have done as well as possible. Add a couple of stainless steel sheet metal screws above the rivet to help keep everything together, if possible. If this seems to work out OK, then add another couple of sheet metal screws to the opposite side for appearance sake. This is just about as good as it is going to get as far as repairing old fibergalss is concerned.

I worked in a fiberglass boat building shop in high school and this is how I would approach a repair on old deteriating fiberglass. Fiberglass has a life expectancy and once this has been exceeded then there is not a lot you can do about it, repair wise. Expect the other side to try to delaminate the same as the drivers side has done. It is obvious that this corner is the weak point in the design of this hardtop. It occured on the drivers side first because that side gets the most wear. But it will eventually occur on the less used pasesengers side as well.

You can do as good a repair as anyone, since you are fighting basic fatigue failure of the original fiberglass material due to age. The trick here is not past experience, but careful patience as you do the repair. And keep in mind that if you cannot successfully make a decent repair, then it is due to the condition of what you are working with, not any failure on your part. Probably no one else would be able to do it any better than you did.
 

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I have not worked with old fibreglass but I have worked with fibreglass on my club race car and after a few crashes and repairs I love the stuff. Extremely easy to repair and as good as new.

Good luck
Pete
 

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Polyester resin is great for layups.... but not ideal for repair... I'd recommend using Epoxy as the resin component for this...

West System epoxy is available in small kits from most boat supply houses and Amazon.

Good luck!!


.
 

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Polyester resin is great for layups.... but not ideal for repair... I'd recommend using Epoxy as the resin component for this...

West System epoxy is available in small kits from most boat supply houses and Amazon.

Good luck!!


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+1
Thickening with CABOSIL will help fill gap.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #7
interesting...
might end up fixing it, might not
not a huge fan of the hardtop because of how much it resonates the exhaust noise inside the car, and the only real reason i use it is because the area around the top still need some work done to it. But i'll probably end up fixing the hardtop one day :whistling:
 

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76' alfa spider
85' jaguar XJ6

My wife's old 72 XJ6 Series I short wheelbase was the best driving/riding/handleing interstate cruiser I ever owned. It would pass everything on the interstate except a gas station.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
they are sublime cars, everything about them is so smooth
its a shame they're plagued with so many small problems
 

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they are sublime cars, everything about them is so smooth
its a shame they're plagued with so many small problems
You have elegantly summed up the classic in-line 6 cylinder Jaguars in a nutshell.
 
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