Alfa Romeo Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
340 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Yes Virginia, there is a Santa Claus....the pedal box is out, thanks to the suggestions of removing the rubber covers. So I ordered a new pivot shaft at the suggestion of just about everybody who mentions it. After I removed the pedal box I noted a piece of wire where a cotter pin should go so somebody's been here before (in the last 47 years) on the clutch rod so I wondered whether it had been replaced already. See picture. Is this the old or the new?
Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Hood Automotive exterior Auto part

Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Hood Automotive exterior Auto part
 

Attachments

·
Administrator
'66 Sprint GT, '67 Duetto, '70 BMW 2800CS
Joined
·
13,071 Posts
I think you mean "is this a new clutch shaft & lever", yes?

If that's what you're asking, then the part may be original. Those things don't fail that often, and can last for years. I suspect a lot has to do with variability in the quality of the welds from the factory and how aggressively past owners have stomped on the clutch pedal. Maybe whoever welded your's did a good job and the car's PO's took it easy on the clutch pedal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,615 Posts
It looks original to me, but I could be wrong. Frankly, I think the biggest contributor to these things failing is an old clutch line hose that is partially blocked on the inside. We all know the rubber delaminates over time on the ID, and restricts the flow of fluid, thus hydraulically overloading the pedal pivot arm. It's best to replace that hose if there's any doubt as to its time in service. Better yet, get the SS braided teflon hose, which will easily outlast the rubber ones.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
340 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OK, to moderately change the subject: Pic of the fluid I drained from the clutch. Should I rebuild/replace the master, the slave, the hose or all of them? Seems to be hard to find rebuild kits.
Drinkware Tableware Cup Ingredient Serveware
 

·
Registered
74 Spider 78 Spider 84 Spider
Joined
·
1,094 Posts
pivot level looks original. The factory weld also looks marginal. I have a couple originals and the welds looks way more complete on mine. Since it's already out, perhaps take it to a muffler shop and have the guy complete the weld bead all the way around. It looks to only be welded half way.
 

·
Premium Member
1987 Spider
Joined
·
140 Posts
I was under the impression that the break typically occurs behind the weld. The pivot shaft is smaller in diameter where it is inserted into the arm, and it is this smaller section of the shaft inside the arm that breaks. At least that's how it was on my failed pivot.

So the quality of the outside weld may be less important. I believe I've read about someone welding the inside of the arm, where the shaft enters the arm. That would take the stress off the section of shaft with the smaller diameter.

There was a gentleman selling upgraded pivots with a larger diameter, but I think he was closing out his remaining stock recently on the classifieds.

EDIT - yep, they are all sold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,615 Posts
Brad, you're right about the location of the failure. I'm no metallurgist, but they seem to have a lack of penetration and weld area onto the end of the shaft itself. It's visible on a broken pivot arm.

I did get the backside of my pivot arm mig welded so that the shaft was fused directly to the other side of the arm. A skilled welder can lay the wire down there in a small fillet. He ground out the front side factory weld, and rewelded that also. That was over 20 years ago. I still have that pivot arm in my Spider.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GradBrad
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top