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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here is a series of photos: installing front spring into my '67 GTV. The technique would apply to all 105/115 cars. Caution: SAFTEY FIRST, LAST AND ALWAYS!
Once you have all the parts ready, I start with a 5/16" threaded steel rod, they come in 36" length, at mininum: 6 nuts, 4 flat washers and 2 lock washers. Mark the rod for 9" lengths, make sure you put nuts on both side of the marks, then cut to length, use a grinder and wire wheel to clean the cut ends, then work the nuts off and on so you can easily thread each end. Set two rod in to the A-arms as pictured, at the top of each rod should be a nut/lock/nut combination well tightened, this is the end you'll turn; a place a flat washer between this combination and the A-arm for security and turning ease. Put the spring pan on the other end of the rods with a flat washer and nut. insert the spring with any shims your using, don't forget the top spring mount (if you haven't taken the car totally apart, the old upper spring mount may still be in place). Raise the spring pan with the spring "up" so the spring is now centered in place with the upper spring mount in its seat correctlly (a small jack will help, do not try to compress yet) now tighten the bottom nuts on the two rods to hold this hanging in place (no compression). I then use a small air-ratchet to turn the top nut clockwise with a wrench holding the bottom nut, the screw action will slowly compress the spring. Work each side slowly, a little bit at a time, alternate sides. For saftey you can keep the jack under the center of the spring pan, do not try to use the jack to compress the spring, you'll just start lifting the car off the jack stands! As you compress the spring and get near the end you'll notice the back doesn't close all the way up on the side without the rod, that's normal, as soon as the front is close you can insert the front bolt/nut/washer combination in the empty front hole, tighten this combination snug, but don't torque it. Once the rods are all the way tight you then can put the bolt/nut/washer combination in the rear empty hole, as this gap may still be a little big you can now place the jack on the edge near the rear of the pan to influence the pan the small distance you need to shorten the gap, again snug the bolt, do not torque. Next remove the rear rod by undo the nut/lock/nut combination. Insert bolt/nut/washer in the hole and snug. Now remove the front rod in the same manner and replace with the last bolt combination which in this case in the special unit for the sway bar interface. Now you can tighten all the nut/bolts. I prep all bolts with anti-sieze before installing and use a wood block with the jack so as not to tear up the finish. The process takes about one hour or so. I only use the two rods twice and then throw them away, some may want to use a rod only once.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
completion pix (last two photos out of order)
 

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Most excellent description and the photos will be of great use to those tackling this for the first time.


BTW, where are the caps for the lower control arm bushing nuts? (or were you replacing them and doing like manual says in regard to not fully tightening until the car has it's weight on the suspension, hence not having those in the way yet?)


*is that a non-stock SS braided brake line I see snaking off the edge of the photos? (great ain't they :D )
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Tifosi said:
Most excellent description and the photos will be of great use to those tackling this for the first time.


BTW, where are the caps for the lower control arm bushing nuts? (or were you replacing them and doing like manual says in regard to not fully tightening until the car has it's weight on the suspension, hence not having those in the way yet?)


*is that a non-stock SS braided brake line I see snaking off the edge of the photos? (great ain't they :D )
Thank you. Yes, new bushing; once everything is reinstalled and the chassis is fully loaded I'll fully tighten the nuts, bend the tabs and install the caps. With the complete overhaul those are stainless steel brakelines, they do add to the braking efficiency.
 

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Roger,
That's a pretty slick method. I've been trying to locate a spring compressor that I like, now I have. One suggestion, though. Try using a threaded rod with 'ACME' threads. Not Wiley Coyote's ACME, mind you. ACME threads are designed for this type of appication (they're probably in most screw-type jacks, or spring compressors that are commercially available). The ACME thread will make your rods safer, and need replacement less often. They should be available at any shop specializing in screws, bolts, and fasteners, forget Homeless Depot, they won't have a clue. I'll attach some diagrams of screw threads, the difference should be obvious. The first is of a normal thread, the second is the ACME thread.
thread.gif

Power_screw_acme.gif

Casey
 

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Discussion Starter #7
brew_alfa said:
Roger,
That's a pretty slick method. I've been trying to locate a spring compressor that I like, now I have. One suggestion, though. Try using a threaded rod with 'ACME' threads. Not Wiley Coyote's ACME, mind you. ACME threads are designed for this type of appication (they're probably in most screw-type jacks, or spring compressors that are commercially available). The ACME thread will make your rods safer, and need replacement less often. They should be available at any shop specializing in screws, bolts, and fasteners, forget Homeless Depot, they won't have a clue. I'll attach some diagrams of screw threads, the difference should be obvious. The first is of a normal thread, the second is the ACME thread.
View attachment 39088

View attachment 39089

Casey

Great idea, looks like the thread of a good C-clamp. One thing though, unless the rod is a very high-grade steel, I dodn't know how many times I'd want to use it. Having used this method many times, I notice that the threads themselves get damaged, rubbing against the pan and the A-arms during the process.
 

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I've used good-ol' cheap Ace Hardware grade 5, I think, threaded rod for this job a couple times, which scared heck out of me but worked. Something stronger is definitely preferable, and the ACME thread looks a lot closer to the kinds of threads on the various factory compression tools.

The factory spring compression tool is really good if you have one, and can get the car up high enough to give clearance for the tool (like 18" maybe?).

Andrew
 

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This method works really well, i used a ratchet spanner when i did the Berlina, makes for fast progress. Make sure you get a set of nuts that turn tight on the threads otherwise you might strip the rod when the pressure builds up near the top end of spring compression. Using the lock washer is a good idea, no matter how tight you get the top nuts it may still turn on its own without them.
 

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Following the detailed instructions and photos by Rogerspeed in this thread, I successfully installed the front springs on my '71 GTV today; thanks to all who contributed to this thread; this should be made into a STICKY.

I wasn't able to find 7/16" nor suitable ACME threaded rods, so I picked out two 3/8" rods, already cut to 12" length at Orchard Supply and Hardware. With my jackstands at their lowest to ground setting, these rods were JUST short enough to slot into the spring pan holes from underneath. With six 5/16" nuts, four suitable flat washers, and two lock washers according to Rogerspeed's instructions, the job went very smoothly - no bouncing springs.

The rods seem to still be in usable condition after use (I've only done one side of the car), however, even if they last a second time, I think threads would have been mostly destroyed and the rods would require replacing.

Not having a ratchet spanner to turn the inner-rear rod's top nut, I ended up taking my time, and eventually got the job done. There was no space for my regular ratchet due to the steering tie rod still attached to the track rod.
 

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Remove sway-bar connection first when removing springs

Many thanks to Rogerspeed for this thread. I used it to remove the springs while stripping the car before blasting.
One thing I would add is that if you're removing springs, then it can be quite awkward unless you remove the Roll-bar/sway-bar connection first. This is because this is the only one of the four bolts that is a special type and doesn't just pop out when loosened. So, when I tried to remove the springs with the roll-bar still connected, that corner of the pan wouldn't separate (per the photo attached).
This was because the sway bar was holding the pan up against the A-frame. This could be quite dangerous as the spring could pop out the other corner with the pan being held on just one side. I used a jack to lift the whole A-Frame up before I realised that the best option would be to just remove the sway car connection.
 

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