Alfa Romeo Forums banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,326 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought some carpet from Classic Alfa a while back because the carpet in the car was beyond salvage.
Of course all aftermarket carpet is in pieces unlike the original.
I believe that i have identified all of the pieces but am wondering if they were maybe cut and sewn by Stevie Wonder.
None of these pieces seem to fit well.
Have any of you been through this that can provide any guidance before I start modifying these pieces?
I don't want to cut where i shouldn't.
Are you guys gluing these pieces in place?

THanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,426 Posts
While I can't help with the carpet issue, you know most aftermarket parts are guaranteed to almost fit. A friend reminded me of this while I struggled with door panels recently that had the fastener holes almost in the right location.
 

·
Registered
1999 Mercedes C43, 2003 SL 500, 2000 BMW 540/6 , !981 Alfa Spider
Joined
·
168 Posts
I believe there is a recent "U-toob" (by a Chef Tush) with info on using aftermarket carpet in a series 2 Spider. BTW... Factory molded carpets are NLA, so we don't have a lot of options on carpet replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
This is a recurring theme WRT carpets. The aftermarket kits to replace the factory molded onesey are always subject to complaint. In addition, they don't include all of the necessary pieces (such as the transmission tunnel kick panels). Someone on this board created his own onesey (in red). He created a form of wood and seemed to do a good job. Having determined that buying precut pieces was going to be problematic, I decided to try it myself. I bought 5 or 6 yards of carpet and tried his technique with the wooden form. I measured the one-piece original carefully for the hole locations, but when I tried installing, everything was a bit off. As a result, I decided to roll my own separate cut pieces. It's in process and it's coming out okay. I'll post some pictures later today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,803 Posts
I guess if one found a NOS one piece carpet, a negative and positive form could be made

the best video how it is done is an Australian company, search "Knox Auto Carpets how to make a moulded car carpet"

looks fairly easy with the right equipment:cool:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,326 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I guess if one found a NOS one piece carpet, a negative and positive form could be made

the best video how it is done is an Australian company, search "Knox Auto Carpets how to make a moulded car carpet"

looks fairly easy with the right equipment:cool:
And the key is "the right equipment"
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,326 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I believe there is a recent "U-toob" (by a Chef Tush) with info on using aftermarket carpet in a series 2 Spider. BTW... Factory molded carpets are NLA, so we don't have a lot of options on carpet replacement.
Found it, Thanks

 

·
Registered
1999 Mercedes C43, 2003 SL 500, 2000 BMW 540/6 , !981 Alfa Spider
Joined
·
168 Posts
After much frustration, his results actually look pretty decent.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pantera928

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
652 Posts
I used a steamer to help make the pieces mold and conform. Harbor freight. Also good for cleaning.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pantera928

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,326 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks gentlemen
I guess it is what it is. I will battle it again today
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
As promised, here are some pictures of my in progress work. As an aside, the reason I got into this was that the car stalled whilst I was driving with my brother. A fuel delivery problem and I began chasing it as such. The wiring for the fuel pumps is pretty arcane and in order to find the different wires to and from the engine compartment, I pulled the carpet out and most of the dash. When I did so, I found that the floor boards on both sides were much more rusted than I thought. Bought some new floorboards from Classic Alfa in the UK and, after some cutting and fitting, welded them in place. Then I put down thermal and sound deadening material, followed by 1/2 inch jute as an underlayment. I had already scraped away all of the linoleum from the factory. And, oh, by the way, the problem with the stalling was a bad O2 sensor which happens to be in the circuit for the fuel pumps (one of the fantastic experts on this board pointed me in that direction). I also recovered the seats in leather and replaced the top as part of this extravaganza. Both activities have been covered extensively by others on this board. Sorry not to have cleaned up before most of these pictures.
I bought some new carpet shears and 50 yards of a beige twill tape. I used 2 different techniques with the twill tape. For the carpet under the console and the door panels, I sewed the twill tape on the underside of each edge and then contact glued the pieces to the jute. As you can see on the door pieces I needed to roll them with a wooden roller and was too lazy to run back to my garage from the workshop (dumb, I know). For the doors and the lower back bulkhead I made poster board templates first, overcut the carpet and trimmed it to fit. A bit of a challenge getting the holes lined correctly. For the kick panels along the transmission hump, I used the old carpet pieces as templates and glued the carpet whilst fitting. The factory had some screws in the kick panels, but since there slots/tabs and part of the panel fits under the shift lever console area as well, I didn't bother with screws. I also did not carpet behind the kick panels and shifter. There's jute then and it's otherwise invisible (to say nothing of being a real pain to get to and install).

The lower rear bulkhead was my first attempt and I wrapped the twill tape around the edge. When I saw the contrast, I decided not to do that with most of the other component areas. However, as you can see I did the same thing with the package shelf and it turned out well. The original had a dark brown plastic binding sewn to the edge. I tried to reuse it but it didn't work so I used the twill tape. I like it.

Right now I'm working on the complex upper rear bulkhead carpeting. On the right side there's a plastic panel that I covered easily, however the left side is part of the rear carpet. It's got multiple molded elements (part of the seatbelt system, the intermediate bolt, and the package shelf support brackets). I think that I can do it without the molding the carpet since most of it is under the package shelf and doesn't have to fit perfectly tightly. The challenge is the compound curved back with the metal bracing and overlaid plastic strip (I've renovated the old one with some black gorilla tape). There's also a grommet up high on the back carpeting for no obvious purpose that I can tell. I thought that it might either be for a breathing hole or for some sort of drain tube, but neither make a lot of sense to me. Lining up the holes that attach the carpet to the body will be a real chore. After that it's on to the front floor carpeting and reinstallation of the seats. A challenging project for someone who has never used a sewing machine before. 60 year old Kenmore model is working well, but I'll **** sure never be a tailor.
Motor vehicle Car Automobile pedal Vehicle Steering wheel
Hood Motor vehicle Trunk Automotive design Luggage and bags
Hood Motor vehicle Car Automotive tire Yellow

Hood Sleeve Motor vehicle Automotive design Luggage and bags
 
  • Like
Reactions: Stevew

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,326 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Looks very nice
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,326 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
While i am hitting the home stretch on installing this carpet, I will make the following comments.

If your original carpet is salvageable, use it. You can dye it if that is the main problem and floor mats can cover worn spots on the bottom part.

Installation definitely requires some cutting to get it to fit. Measure twice and cut once.
 
  • Like
Reactions: factotum and billj

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I can second Greg's comment about measuring twice before cutting. I would go further to say that you should cut a bit larger than initially measured. I put in new carpet a couple of years ago. Several of the larger pieces have now settled, likely from getting hot and conforming to the contours. I now have some small gaps at the transmission tunnel.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,919 Posts
As promised, here are some pictures of my in progress work. As an aside, the reason I got into this was that the car stalled whilst I was driving with my brother. A fuel delivery problem and I began chasing it as such. The wiring for the fuel pumps is pretty arcane and in order to find the different wires to and from the engine compartment, I pulled the carpet out and most of the dash. When I did so, I found that the floor boards on both sides were much more rusted than I thought. Bought some new floorboards from Classic Alfa in the UK and, after some cutting and fitting, welded them in place. Then I put down thermal and sound deadening material, followed by 1/2 inch jute as an underlayment. I had already scraped away all of the linoleum from the factory. And, oh, by the way, the problem with the stalling was a bad O2 sensor which happens to be in the circuit for the fuel pumps (one of the fantastic experts on this board pointed me in that direction). I also recovered the seats in leather and replaced the top as part of this extravaganza. Both activities have been covered extensively by others on this board. Sorry not to have cleaned up before most of these pictures.
I bought some new carpet shears and 50 yards of a beige twill tape. I used 2 different techniques with the twill tape. For the carpet under the console and the door panels, I sewed the twill tape on the underside of each edge and then contact glued the pieces to the jute. As you can see on the door pieces I needed to roll them with a wooden roller and was too lazy to run back to my garage from the workshop (dumb, I know). For the doors and the lower back bulkhead I made poster board templates first, overcut the carpet and trimmed it to fit. A bit of a challenge getting the holes lined correctly. For the kick panels along the transmission hump, I used the old carpet pieces as templates and glued the carpet whilst fitting. The factory had some screws in the kick panels, but since there slots/tabs and part of the panel fits under the shift lever console area as well, I didn't bother with screws. I also did not carpet behind the kick panels and shifter. There's jute then and it's otherwise invisible (to say nothing of being a real pain to get to and install).

The lower rear bulkhead was my first attempt and I wrapped the twill tape around the edge. When I saw the contrast, I decided not to do that with most of the other component areas. However, as you can see I did the same thing with the package shelf and it turned out well. The original had a dark brown plastic binding sewn to the edge. I tried to reuse it but it didn't work so I used the twill tape. I like it.

Right now I'm working on the complex upper rear bulkhead carpeting. On the right side there's a plastic panel that I covered easily, however the left side is part of the rear carpet. It's got multiple molded elements (part of the seatbelt system, the intermediate bolt, and the package shelf support brackets). I think that I can do it without the molding the carpet since most of it is under the package shelf and doesn't have to fit perfectly tightly. The challenge is the compound curved back with the metal bracing and overlaid plastic strip (I've renovated the old one with some black gorilla tape). There's also a grommet up high on the back carpeting for no obvious purpose that I can tell. I thought that it might either be for a breathing hole or for some sort of drain tube, but neither make a lot of sense to me. Lining up the holes that attach the carpet to the body will be a real chore. After that it's on to the front floor carpeting and reinstallation of the seats. A challenging project for someone who has never used a sewing machine before. 60 year old Kenmore model is working well, but I'll **** sure never be a tailor.
The grommet is for the rubber straps. To hold them up out of the way when the top is up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
The grommet is for the rubber straps. To hold them up out of the way when the top is up.

Thanks, Jim, but what rubber straps when the top is up? If you meant when the top is down, I'm still confused.
Eric
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
I installed a carpet set on my 78 spider. When the box first arrived, none of it made any sense. But by placing pieces and understanding the overlaps, it began to make sense.
Overall fit is nice, with exception of the back. My 78 apparently is a S2-S3 and some modifications were made to the back. But all else fit fine. The other issue I have is the hand brake corrugated rubber attachment to the carpet. It always come loose. Does anyone have a fix for that??
 

·
Registered
1981 Spider - Daisy, 1976 Spider - Tex
Joined
·
99 Posts
For What Its Worth. Not a YouTube but some photos and comments
 

·
Premium Member
1971 Spider (USA) 1750 Spica
Joined
·
331 Posts
I bought and installed a carpet kit for my 71 Spider a year ago. Like a jigsaw puzzle, it took a while to figure out, but overall it was ok. BUT… the kit did NOT include pieces for the package deck and rear/side walls! Was I P*SSED to learn THAT! So, I had to roll my own, so to speak — found a remnant that matched surprisingly well at a carpet store. Sadly, it is precisely that area that SCREAMS for a molded piece in 3D space.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,919 Posts
.
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top