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Discussion Starter #1
Someone recently posted about a very nice Giulietta in England, and mentioned having failed the MOT requirements. With some variations, a lot of us in the U.S. have the luxury to drive anything on the highway that can move under it's own power (with the result that unsafe cars can be seen with frequency). In addition, vehicles with reasonable or sometimes bizarre modifications are seen; again, with no apparent review or approval required. This isn't intended to start a flame war, but it would be interesting to learn what safety / inspection requirements are in place around the world.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Bump.

I was just curious about inspection requirements in different parts of the world, and how they affected Alfas; especially older ones...

Where I live, there is nothing. No inspection whatsoever. Don't you Australian, New Zealand, and other owners wish you didn't have to worry about rust, lights, modification approval, etc?. If I drive in Eastern Kentucky, all I have to worry about on the road is meeting a speeding coal truck weighing 10 - 20,000 lb over the legal weight limit.
 

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Most US states probably do have some sort of minimal requirements as to roadworthy-ness. But those laws are selectively enforced (which tends to make them either moot at best or discriminatory at worst).

IMO, the biggest danger to road safety is not rusty floorboards or bald tires but the loose nuts holding the steering wheel...!
 

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New Mexico doesn't have any vehicle safety inspection, and only one county does smog tests. As Conedriver mentioned, if it has some tires, possibly glass, you can drive it. I also see quite frequently here, cars with tags that have been expired three or more years. They say your aren't a New Mexican unless you have a cracked windshield. It's not unusual to see cars with exterior body parts duct taped on!

Being from Washintgon, D.C., I can tell you that they have a fairly tough inspection policy. Brakes are tested for stopping power rather than just a visual as in other states. They also don't allow rust holes in the body.
 

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I could tell you all about the very strict biennial inspection requirements in Norway (cars registered before 1960 are exempt), the extreme taxation on new cars (EU price * 2.5) and used cars (USD 500/year just to own it), the USD 8.75/gallon fuel price, the laughable condition of most public roads, the neverending traffic everywhere in the Oslo metropolitan area, the salting which eats up the brakes, suspension and everything else in 4-5 years, the USD 100/hr workshop cartel prices, the insane cost of spare parts, the almost complete lack of Italian cars and the proliferation of very small diesel engines.

But I won't. It would only depress me.
 

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Texas has an annual safety inspection that checks some stuff but NOWHERE near as complete/invasive as a typical Euro check (Control Technique in France, etc.). They check here: reg paperwork and insurance to stamped VIN, headlights/adjustment, brake lights and parking/directional lights, significant issues with window glass (more than small rock chips, etc.), tires above minimum (wear bars), handbrake and brakes, horn, wipers, and they do a roadworthiness test. Some EPA non-attainment areas they do a smog check. Not too much but some. Still lots of wrecks on the road spewing stuff.
 
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