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What are things you look for when you go to inspect a potential purchase ? I've been sniffing a few restored cars. I know restored cars can have a lot of "cover up":surprise:

What's your "quick and dirty" ?
 

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I finished a ground up restoration of my 1961 Sprint Veloce. I am restoring one 750 Spider and one 750 Spider Veloce and both are ground up restorations. I only hire a very knowledgeable Alfa person to perform an inspection of any car that you might be interested in purchasing. I know of a number of Alfa owners that purchased cars that were not correct and had to undergo expensive repairs to fix hidden body damage.
 

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Giulia Spiders and Sprints, as well as Giulietta versions suffer the same issues. These cars were not originally designed to last 50 years or more. Corrosion of structural members is extremely common with these cars, and though not terribly difficult to address and repair, many feel they will just use the car as a "driver" for a few years watching the value increase, and pass the car on. Repairs are cover-up at best in these cases, often dangerous in others. There is no easy quick-and-dirty means to discover a quality repair from a cover-up without partial disassembly, as in a restoration. Generally, a quality restoration will have a history WITH photographs of the repairs, just as seen here on the BB. One reason to document high quality restoration work on the BB is that members see the car, see the work, and remember who did the work, and who had the car. Buying a car with photo restoration documentation history, from one that spent the time and money is never a mistake.
Buying a car to restore yourself, or have professionally restored, you need to be sure the car is complete and restorable within your means. Again, a car with known owner history that shows little or no cover-up repair is a reasonable starting point. Finally, having an individual with restoration experience with the specific model is extremely useful. They can spot "issues" from personal experience, thus saving you both time and money.
My opinion from my own experiences over time.
 

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I finished a ground up restoration of my 1961 Sprint Veloce. I am restoring one 750 Spider and one 750 Spider Veloce and both are ground up restorations. I only hire a very knowledgeable Alfa person to perform an inspection of any car that you might be interested in purchasing. I know of a number of Alfa owners that purchased cars that were not correct and had to undergo expensive repairs to fix hidden body damage.
Great advice. Nothing better than the eyes and advice of someone who's done a Giulietta restoration before.

Body coverups that us mortals can't see are usually still visible to a professional restorer. You can also use an electronic dry film thickness gauge to be sure (they're made for both steel and aluminum sheet metal), but don't ding a car where it's supposed to have leaded/filled joints.

Is it possible to see inside the sills with a borescope? If yes, I'd take one of those.

Inspect it up on a lift or at least up on jack stands

If possible, do a leak-down test (easy with portable take of compressed air, spark plug wrench, a little anti-seize, and the LD gauge.

If a restoration was done, ask for pictures to show your 'expert'
 
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