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Discussion Starter #1
Hi does anyone know the full history of this car, I only know chassis number 916139 and the engine number 926455 originally correspond to an Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Sport Pinin Farina, manufactured on the 23rd March 1948 and sold on the 20th January 1949 in Turin, Italy.
Andres
 

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What is your interest in this car?

Dear Andres,

What is your interest in this car? Do you have a few pictures?
They might help create some extra interest in this thread.

Ciao! Olaf
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ar 6c 2500

The car is mine and I want to know if someone have some info of this car (origin and so on)
regards
Andres
 

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This car was just on eBay (item #330844908665 ended Dec 21, 2012, starting price $200.00, 24 bids to $150,100.00, reserve not met, seller: andreskormis2009, location: Santiago, Santiago / Las Condes, Chile, 60,000 miles) with the following description and pictures:

Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 cabriolet sport pininfarina
The car is located in Santiago - Chile it was restored about 10 years ago, runs fine and have all his original parts (nothing is missing), the conditions is really good.
The car belong to the same owner for the last 35 years.
The car numbers are Chasis 916139, Engine 926455 - Matching numbers
Shipping worldwide on behalf of the buyer (from Chile)
Millage unknown - shown millage is only referential
Given the wording in the first post of this thread, he obviously has some information from Centro Documentazione, but doesn't care to share that information here (or what he posted on eBay, for that matter), nor did he volunteer any information or details about this car in this thread.
 

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You probably don't have any idea how rude you are.
 

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History of 916139

I have done no specific study of 916139 but would enjoy having some additional information from the current owner. Data sought would come from the car itself and any files that accompanied the car during recent(?) sale(s). I realize that such files are often meager, but there can be interesting leads given by even small details ... if they are shared. If the radiator was repaired in France ... or Germany (or elsewhere), this can help us to look in other places for additional information.

In his book, Alfa Romeo 6C2500, Tito Anselmi shared some basic production data information about most Alfa Romeo 6C2500 cars built after about July of 1942. That information came from Alfa Romeo records.

It seems that the Alfa Romeo records showed that 916139 was delivered to Pinin Farina to receive a body ... but did not record the body configuration. I am considering that the presentation of the car today as a cabriolet fulfills the most likely original configuration for such a car of the time, so we have already learned something of interest by seeing that the car exists ... and what form it has. That is a good beginning.

It would be very nice to learn the Pinin Farina body number. Sometimes the last three (or two?) digits can be found stamped in the bonnet panels (inner flange areas near the central hinge) and glove-box door hinges ... as easy places to look. It will also appear stamped, scratched, crayoned and penciled in/on many other trim parts. Many parts need to be removed in order to find the number on a hidden area.

It is normal practice today for Alfa Romeo to withhold the name of the first owner, probably for legal reasons valid in Italy. "Francesco Giovine, Torino" was shared by the appendix in Tito's book as the name of the first owner with a consignment date of 16 February 1949, following the chassis-ready date of 23 March 1948. Tito did not share a date corresponding to the "sold" date that you evidently received from Alfa Romeo, so we get to believe that Tito considered the consignment date to be the more important data point in a line of information that was limited as to its size in his book. This makes me wonder if there is additional information in the Alfa Romeo archive that was not shared by Tito?

Although the name "Giovine" is not truly common, there are 41 listings currently in Torino, none of them for someone named "Francesco". If someone would like to chase the name as a lead, one might go to Torino, purchase an inexpensive cell phone and a month's service, hole up in an inexpensive albergo and start to make some calls to people who might be family members? If you strike out in Torino itself, one might begin to search nearby areas. The internet makes it simple to find many possibilities ... but the people you seek may not be listed in any telephone directory? Such research is not a sure thing at all!

I have gathered a data collection that describes some little bit individually about more than 20,000 Italian cars, generally of a low-production and specialized nature. "Francesco Giovine" does not appear yet in the histories of any other cars that I've studied and described only partially during researches of the last 30-plus years. It is quite likely that his name will turn up one day in association with another car ... but not so far. It does not seem that he was a regular "player" in the brief ownership of a variety of interesting cars, so we cannot yet learn more about him by researching another car.

There is another research possibility! If we were to research Torino license plate numbers issued beginning 16 February 1949, there is a good chance that the car would turn up within a very short time period. The plate will probably be somewhat near "TO92000". We can perhaps narrow the start number down a bit with a bit of additional checking among numbers already researched while studying other cars. As part of the process, we would also gather some information on a number of other cars before (probably) tripping across the plate number for 916139. It might well be that the Torino plate will lead to another plate that will wish to be researched, but this will probably be quite specific. The only real risk with this research is that there is the remote possibility that Francesco Giovine pruchased the car for export on behalf of someone else and never registered it himself. It is also possible that Giovine purchased the car to take to South America himself? Neither of these possibilities are likely ... but remain possibilities. There are fees to pay for each number plate researched and it all takes time. So, such research does come at some trouble and expense. I can introduce you to an Italian friend who could do it and perhaps help devise a strategy to spend the least possible. I will work with you if you like as I always hope to learn more as part of the process.

Do you wish to know additional early history even if it should come at some expense?

John
 
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