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Hello, I have found ignition coils on summit racing’s website of all places, backordered. The number is 221 504 456. They look right but they are missing the 0 prefix. I noticed a lot of the coils are like that. Anyone have experience ordering these lately? Thanks. It’s for. 164 q.
 

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1994 Alfa Romeo 164LS/Q-1974 Laverda 1000 3C
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I ordered three Bremi Alfa 164 24v coils off the bay. Not too expensive coming from Latvia. I have used this seller in the past without issues. $35.36 each and $18 shipping. I got three new coils to replace the old three coils hard to get to and hidden behind the intake. I will install the new coils when I replace the timing belt. Keep the old ones as spares.

Bremi 164 24v coils
 

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Bob, hmm, never had a problem with the LS coils, only the power modules instead. Carlo just said, if they work, don't mess with them.
 

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Yeah, I see what you are saying, they worked ok before I had an engine mishap. I broke one of the coil connectors apart by accident when I was moving my engine across the garage floor. One of those doh moments.
 

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As a mechanical engineer I have no business venturing an opinion on anything electrical, but as a human I can't help it, so here goes: As far as I know, coils are very simple devices, they are just transformers, and about the only parameter that matters to the proper functioning of your ignition system (on any brand/model of vehicle) is the primary winding's resistance, which should match as closely as possible the specification for your ignition module (if electronic), or ignition points (if old-school). E.g. most coils for electronic ignitions need to have a primary resistance in the 0.75-1.5 Ohm range, while ignition points usually require something around 3.0-4.0 Ohms. Knowledgeable readers, please chime in...….
 

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1994 Alfa Romeo 164LS/Q-1974 Laverda 1000 3C
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Indeed there is a very valid point, if it isn't broke..dont fix it.

On the other hand 24v parts are becoming more difficult to find and my time is very valuable. Getting 3 new coil packs to replace those more difficult to get to 1.2.3 pots behind the intake while servicing the timing belt just makes sense.

The OEM Alfa coil packs do have a reputation for cracking, arcing and causing misfires, see the picture above. Remembering those coil packs are now 27 years old and if I find a cracked coil issue when servicing the belts, I now must stop work, take a one month+ wait on quality made coils OR paying hundreds of dollars more locally and getting some China made junk then waiting a week or so for China coil packs.

So my reasoning is install three new coil packs on the difficult to get to backside of the 24v engine then keep the three "good" used near three decade old coil packs for backup spares, if the coils do not have any visible cracks developing.
 

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Ok, while you are in there, you might as well change those particular Iridium plugs, as they are one generation older than the good to go fronts which are pretty new, very few miles on them, relatively speaking. Yeah, I got lazy when I decided to change several plugs when I had the problem with one power module cr*pping out. I think those modules are less reliable than the coils, that's why I gave you spares of those.

Um, Xiden?
 

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1994 Alfa Romeo 164LS/Q-1974 Laverda 1000 3C
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Got six new NGK BKR6EIX to fit at service. Like to get the scheduled maintenance balanced.
 
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