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Discussion Starter #1
When I was cleaning the "oil fumes recovery trap" at the back of the engine, I removed the idle speed actuator for access. I noticed the black plastic gasket into the rear head was really loose and the plastic hard.
I wrapped a about 4 turns of electricians tape and installed it all together again, and couldn't believe what a difference this made to the smooth running of the car:)
The car purrs flawlessly when started from cold, previously it used to be tiny bit rough until warm. Also noticed a difference when idling at traffic lights. Even at high speed the car seems smoother, although this could have been my imagination.
So I reckon this should be scheduled maintenance to check and replace this gasket. Anyone found a replacement part for this?

-VARIS
 

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So I reckon this should be scheduled maintenance to check and replace this gasket. Anyone found a replacement part for this?

-VARIS
Gaskets can usually be made from heavy paper or a sort of impregnated cork.

Engine silicone is a great thing to have around. Even if the gasket has tiny cracks that let air in and out or is no longer flexible, a little dab of silicone should seal it. It will also outlast the tape that just wasn't made for those sort of hot and greasy conditions.
 

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Idle actuator "gasket" is really a rubber ring that fits on IAC inlet and then seals it in the intake plenum.

The black tape repair is the best way get a tight fit/seal unless you can find a new ring gasket.
 

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I've done the electrical tape thing on these and it works well, solves the false air problem. The donut gasket is a hard item to find new these days, so you did the right thing.
Charles
 

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What does the actuator look like and is it hard to get off?
 

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What does the actuator look like and is it hard to get off?
Bright aluminium pot shape layed on side with rubber shroud and one-bolt saddle clamp, on back of intake plenum chamber. Has one hose and one electrical plug.

Very easy to get off - probably the hardest part being the releasing of the electrical plug (spring clip ends have to be pried out but can't be seen underneath) and of the hose (might have Clic-clamp fitted).

Rubber ring (gasket) would certainly be nice to replace. I have put them in with grey silicone before - need to be degreased first. The single-bolt clamp that holds the valve in place always seems just a little insufficient to me.

I reckon a similar air leak would be caused by the six 'rubber' hoses on the chrome pipes - these are usually hard and brittle and the pipe stubs they push onto (on the plenum chamber) have no ridges - instead, they are nearly a taper fit. I think new Norma-type screw clamps are a worthwhile precaution to clamp them up properly tight.

-Alex
 

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Thanks Alex. I will check ours out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Pretty hard to check for vacuum leaks, especially on the intake I know its recommeded to spray a solvent close by and listen for change in engine revs. This doesn't seem to work so well i find. Any other methods for checking those chrome pipes? I don't want to disturb them, as the seals are probably brittle.
 

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Talking about air leaks, I took the opportunity to take a look at a turbo engine out of the car last time I went to the wreckers. I'd always wondered where the vacuum hoses were: under the big, thick cast manifold. They're almost inaccessible.
 
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