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Oof, pricey fuel. Right now we are running along about $4.25-4.50/gallon for premium here in the Seattle area. East coast is lower by ~$0.50 where we were visiting in New England (always depending of course), and in California they seem to be running about $5/6 per gallon I guess, according to the news.

Turns out the prices are very high because the worldwide oil companies reduced their production because of the pandemic and the expected lower demand; and now that demand is up, they have jacked the prices clear out of sight. Why? Because they can. They control the market and prices.

Not really into big engines as well, but got this car in a fantastic sweetheart deal, and wanted to try something a little different than our Alfas. Very different for sure. Doesn't get driven much, though.

Pushrods work very well, just not "modern", lol.
Gas at Costco here in SoCal is around $4.60 for 91, although I did see $6.50 in LA on Friday. Yikes.
 
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When Pete says Holden engine he really means GM; Holden made them in Australia for Commodores and a version of the blocks were sent to Alfa in Italy for these 3.2 engines. The heads were designed and manufactured in Italy IIRC.

As Pete and Dean say these cars have a reputation for being heavy, and the spider versions for also being very flexible. The platform was shared with the 159. If anything the 159 wagon was the best looking of the lot, best had with the 2.4 JTD engine by all reports.
 
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I don't think that's correct however I understand this is a point of conjecture. Alfa massaged the intake system, I don't believe they changed the heads. Indeed like the JTS when you inevitably replace the timing chain you use GM parts.

Quick calculation would have petrol in the US at a similar price here. Must be killing the people who drive those massive pick ups.
More than happy to be corrected in that one, it’s sad either way to remember as we write these words of the factories and knowledge lost when the auto industry pulled up stumps in Australia.

Yes, gas (petrol) is pricey in parts of the US. It does vary though depending on local and state taxes.
 
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I make it a habit to stay away from Holden's but I am sure in my discussions with Oratzio, who has heaps of experience on both cars, he can confirmed this. Something to chew over Friday fish n chips next time your in Melbourne.

I have huge sympathy for the workers who lost their jobs in the auto manufacturing industry. That's where it stops. It might not be a popular opinion but Australia has never made cars good enough to compete on the world market. Look at the main stays. Falcon, Commodore, Sigma/Magna. They are all really bad cars. I'll bite my tongue when it comes to anything from the US other to say that if anyone thinks a trans am was a good car they can stay away from my alfa 😁
Actually they do make some really good cars in the US, you see quite a few of them on the roads in Australia mainly going by the name of Toyota, Mercedes, and BMW. We just bought a GLE 350 made in Alabama, quality is excellent.
 
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It's interesting getting feedback on Alfa models that were unavailable to us here in the US, from other parts and other markets. The good, the bad, and the ugly so to speak! Thanks guys.
I’d love to show folks in the US some of the cars they missed out on but which we are very familiar with, starting with the Alfasud. Now that’s a car to lust after which is still affordable even though so few are left of course.
 

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I have posted this before but its worth another shot because its just so good. Wait for the guest appearance from Peter Griffin.

Love that video. So many of those Sud series cars ended up as club racers, they'd led a hard life by then! Nice to see Joe Beninca get such a good rap from the commentators and other drivers. His workshop was only 1k or so from my place in Melbourne, I spent a lot of time up there working on various cars and just hanging out.
 
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Yep... Henry N Manney III sure liked the Sud. I recall reading his reports in R&T, way back when. Never had an opportunity to drive one myself, but I've seen a Sud driven briskly and they appear to handle very well.
They handled in a way that their simple design and suspension layout had no right to do. Just sublime, loved to rev and could go round the outside of many supposedly more exotic and more powerful cars. The Angeles Crest Highway is made for them...if only!
 
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Alister my first track day at Winton about 30 years ago Colin took me out in his 33 to show me the way around. We came out of the sweeper and four wheel drifted all the way into the first right hand tit. I can still see his face as he turned to me and said 'I bet you didn't think a front wheel drive could do that'.
Colin Thomas (a.k.a. ColCol)? He and I were made life members of AROCA(Vic) on the same night back in 2014. My memories of the Winton 6-Hr will forever have an image of Colin at pit exit waving cars out, last I heard he still owned that spot. Really nice guy.
 
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ALFA probably took their time to tune the handling on their FWD models. My very first car was an 850 Austin Mini (not a Cooper S, tho). I admit they carved the corners rather nicely. FWD, for the most part, is for the benefit of the car manufacturer, vs a fussy driver. Only so much HP you can ask of the front wheels that have to steer also. But the average driver wouldn't notice the difference. What ever driving skills I might posses were honed for RWD. Each one requires a different set of skills and inputs.

Whenever I am backed into a corner on the FWD vs RWD question... I have to reluctantly resort to this argument:
All NASCAR racers are born as FWD models when on the showroom floor. Chevy, Ford, Dodge, Toyota. The builders chuck everything FWD and turn it into RWD for the race track. Must be some major benefits for them to start from scratch.

I had a love affair with my 1966 Olds Toronado years back. First modern US car with FWD. Maybe the 1936 Cord 812 was the actual first here. None in between as I recall. Wasn't intended for carving corners on mountain roads, of course. But as a land yacht, it was gorgeous and an engineering triumph.
The original Mini was probably one of the best handling road cars ever. I used to believe that I would get through any corner no matter how fast I entered it

Pete
My family had a stock ‘65 850 Mini for many years, I think I’ve mentioned it here before, and it was a hoot to drive. Ran cross-plies and had no power but in the wet you could slide it around endlessly doing no more than 40-50 mph. Sadly it rusted away as many cars do in the salty Auckland climate.
 
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All this talk of American iron reminds me how much I’ve come to appreciate the design of 50’s and 60’s US cars since being able to regularly attend Cars and Coffee type events in SoCal. Or Donut Derelicts in Huntington Beach, if anyone is in that area on a Saturday morning it’s a must do at least once. So much excess, so much chrome, interiors that are works of art.
 
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