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I replaced the aft axle / differential on my 1986 Spider and had to dismantle the brake lines from the t-piece just in front of the diff. I have put everything together and started to bleed the brakes the normal way. Brakefluid is coming out through the nipple, but I cant manage to get a solid and hard pedal.

Any advises that can help me would be very much appreciated!
 

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if you replaced the whole rear axle, you probably swopped over the brake calipers from the old axle....correct?
if yes, did you put the calipers back on the correct side? There is a left and a right but you can easily fit them back on the wrong side...

simple check, the bleed nipple must be at the top....if not, you have them on the wrong side (and you will never get all the air out)
 

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Thank you very much! I have swapped them!!! The nipple is at the lower point... stupid done by me! I should have seen that!
 

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You might also use a rubber mallet to give the calipers a few taps. Bubbles can sometimes get trapped. That can also happen to the brake master cylinder, though the solution would be to bench bleed it (probably not something you really want to do unless absolutely necessary). Finally, I recommend pressure bleeding as opposed to pedal bleeding.
 

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This is the one I use. Saves a lot of time and aggravation. Fits on the fluid tank perfectly.
And get a set of "speed bleeders. Don't forget the one for the clutch slave. Also at Centerline. I'm going to use the rubber hammer trick....


 

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This is the one I use. Saves a lot of time and aggravation. Fits on the fluid tank perfectly.
And get a set of "speed bleeders. Don't forget the one for the clutch slave. Also at Centerline. I'm going to use the rubber hammer trick....


You will need a really good friend to get them to push the pedal down for 2 days!
 

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I have two brake bleeders. One pressure bleeder that works of the pressure of your spare tyre and one vacuum bleeder, for which you need a decent capacity compressor.

The traditional method of pumping the brake pedal has one disadvantage. During the pumping the stroke is larger than normal. If your master brake cylinder has been in use for some time it will have noticeable ridges near both ends of the cylinder. This is where sediment will accumulate. When pumping the brakes to bleed you push the piston right through it! It might cause extra wear and tear on the piston and you might end up with a failing master cylinder in due course.

So I always prefer to use a proper bleeder. In theory the vacuum bleeder should be more effective than the pressure bleeder. But the pressure bleeder is always a lot faster I find.

In addition it allows for single person operation. As another tip on one person operation with pumping or pressure bleeding: I have a piece of hose with a valve from a bicycle tyre. I put that on the caliper and turn open the bleed valve. Hydraulic oil can only come out, no air can escape back in and I don’t have to keep opening and closing the bleed valve on the caliper.

If you are messing with your callipers, make sure to get the piston into the correct orientation before inserting the brake pads.

Here you can see the use of both my bleeder after I had replaced the front callipers and rotors:

 
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