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1969 Alfa Spider 1750 veloce.
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello my fellow Alfisti.
I'm in the process of changing my brake pads/rotors. I am having a tough time removing the 2 flat head screws that hold the rotor in place. Any tricks that you may know would be helpful. Theyre pretty rusted in there.
Also the 2 19mm bolts that hold the brake calipers in place will not budge. I have spayed some WD40 to know avail. Are they reverse threads? Or are they just rusted in there?
As always any advice is much appreciated..

BTW the brakes are ATE.
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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My electric impact wrench made short work of removing those rotor screws.

WD40 is a pretty crappy penetrant, BTW. I've had good luck with PB Blaster.
 

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Any tricks that you may know would be helpful. Theyre pretty rusted in there.

Also the 2 19mm bolts that hold the brake calipers in place will not budge. I have spayed some WD40 to know avail. Are they reverse threads? Or are they just rusted in there?.
I just did this on my 84. I used my biggest slotted screwdriver which has a square shaft. I put a cresent wrench on the shaft close to the screw, then torqued the driver with the wrench. I used a hammer on the wrench for one that was moderately stuck. The impact screwdriver idea is a great one if you have one.

The caliper bolts on my 84 were all standard thread, none reverse. Best of luck.
 

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Failing what has been suggested, that method worked on 3 of my 4 rotors, I carefully drilled out the conical head (used a large drill bit whose tip approached the cone dimension of the recessed screw head). That left the threaded screw part sticking out when I removed the rotor. I then soaked the "stub" with penetrant. The "stub" is the thickness of the rotor and I was able to grab it with vise grips and twist it off.
Problem seems to be that the penetrant does not get to the root threads, cause its covered by the rotor.
In any event I used the above technuique successfully on any screws that did not respond to the impact method...their slots were toast, so no other option.

Elio
 

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Hello my fellow Alfisti.
I'm in the process of changing my brake pads/rotors. I am having a tough time removing the 2 flat head screws that hold the rotor in place. Any tricks that you may know would be helpful. Theyre pretty rusted in there.
Also the 2 19mm bolts that hold the brake calipers in place will not budge. I have spayed some WD40 to know avail. Are they reverse threads? Or are they just rusted in there?
As always any advice is much appreciated..

BTW the brakes are ATE.
If you have a torch, oxy acetalene, heat the heads of the flat head screws red hot and quench with WD 40.

For the big bolts it should be possible to put enough force on them with a bar and socket to get them loose or break them if the impact gun suggestion does not work. You can try heat from torch and quench but if you heat the bolts you with have to replace them as the heat may alter the metallurgy. These are high strength bolts.

There is also a rust removal product called PB Blaster that some swear by. Worth a try first. Have seen it at CTC.

Good Luck

Ken
 

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1966-2013
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:nod: PB Blaster rocks!

BTW, might be worthwhile to swap the slotted screws for allen heads once things do come apart.
And a teenie drop of nev-r-sieze on the threads will go a long way toward preventing such seizures in the future.
 

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:nod: PB Blaster rocks!

BTW, might be worthwhile to swap the slotted screws for allen heads once things do come apart.
And a teenie drop of nev-r-sieze on the threads will go a long way toward preventing such seizures in the future.
Never seize on the cleaned up counter sink as well as I think that the rust there together with the larger diameter of screw head is what offers the bulk of the reisting torque. That is why hammering with impact screw drivewer or heat is effective with these screws, as it breaks that rust bond. Of course you still may break off the thread in some cases.

Ken
 

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1969 Alfa Spider 1750 veloce.
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all of the replies. I will try the PB blaster, combined with the impact.
Nevr seize is a nice idea-wish the po had done that!!
 

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Push hard and live
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Old trick is to TIGHTEN the screws first. They take a set counter to the original torque, and slightly tightening them breaks this set.

Do not replace with phillips head screws. The only reason phillips head exists is to speed assembly on a production line and perhaps to minimize skating along an adjacent painted surface. You will get better torque application in a slot-headed screw. Slot heads get beaten up because people don't slightly tighten before removal.
 

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Old trick is to TIGHTEN the screws first. They take a set counter to the original torque, and slightly tightening them breaks this set.

Do not replace with phillips head screws. The only reason phillips head exists is to speed assembly on a production line and perhaps to minimize skating along an adjacent painted surface. You will get better torque application in a slot-headed screw. Slot heads get beaten up because people don't slightly tighten before removal.
Hi, Yes I agree with this and have used this technique. May have to used the impact screw driver. Sometimes just hammering on the screw before trying to loosen it also works, if you have a solid steel screw driver with no plastic handle or a bit in a socket extension.

Ken
 

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+1 on the PB blaster. When I did mine, I sprayed the bolts with PB blaster over a few days leading up to the removal. Like Ken says, heat helps a lot too. Good luck
 

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there is an impact screwdriver on the market, well known to motorcycle shops. I have one from harbor freight. it comes with several bits and you hit it with a hammer to remove stubborn screws. I wish I could remember what the thing is called, other than impact screwdriver.
cliff
 

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Using an impact screwdriver on mine merely bent and then broke the hardened screwdriver tip! Ended up have to drill out the screw and retap the hole. As the lug nuts attach to the hub, is it really only these two screws that hold the entire hub/wheel assembly to the rest of the frame??
 

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But Mad North-Northwest
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For the record, I tried an impact driver on mine and it wasn't enough. That's why I suggested the electric impact wrench: it worked a treat.

Harbor Freight sells a cheapo one ($50 or so on sale) that's worked well for my occasional use.
 

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is it really only these two screws that hold the entire hub/wheel assembly to the rest of the frame??
No, the two flat head screws just hold the brake disc to the hub when the lug nuts are removed. Once the wheel is put back on & the lug nuts tightened the two flat head screws are superflous.
 

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That makes me feel better! So really, if those flat head screws are loose, it won't matter as long as the lug nuts are securely fastened.
 

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PB blaster does not work as we expect all the time-just a warning. If rusted in/fused, no Blaster will work, as only thing that will dislodge fused iron is Hydrochloric acid. Theres no acid in PB blaster.

Impact wrench is good. You will have to source new screws afterward. Those screws strip soooo easily. Wonder why they ever used them. Good luck.
 

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Failing what has been suggested, that method worked on 3 of my 4 rotors, I carefully drilled out the conical head (used a large drill bit whose tip approached the cone dimension of the recessed screw head). That left the threaded screw part sticking out when I removed the rotor. I then soaked the "stub" with penetrant. The "stub" is the thickness of the rotor and I was able to grab it with vise grips and twist it off.
Problem seems to be that the penetrant does not get to the root threads, cause its covered by the rotor.
In any event I used the above technuique successfully on any screws that did not respond to the impact method...their slots were toast, so no other option.

Elio
This works on the rear axle straps, as well. I drilled them out, then used a large Vise-grip.

Came right out.
 
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