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I found these step by step instructions for removing a Giulia dash. I would love to learn the steps for removing a Berlina dash. I want to send mine out to have the wood redone as well as the dash cracks fixed.

Thanks!


I found these on the BB for the Super dash:

The Super dash is super easy to remove/install.

1. Remove the dash vent grille near the windshield. (don't lose the big washers, you can't replace them)
2. Under the grille, you'll find three bolts.
3. There is an outboard mount on each side above the fresh air vents
4. There is a mount on each side of the heater box.
Other than wires & cables, you're ready to come out.

Notes:
You can take the gauge cluster out separately if you want, although the four nuts on the backside can be a bit of a battle. Also, it is easier to remove the steering wheel first. The heater unit can pretty much only be R&R'ed with the dash out. Replace the heater valve, you don't want to do this a second time for a leaky valve.
 

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Alfa dashes of this period are all pretty similar in terms of removal. Unhook the battery first. Be prepared to take pics and/or make notes and mark wires and cables.

It can help to remove the console (unplug wires, undo three screws, remove gear shift knob, remove heater control screws, lift console up and back), though it's not required. Having one of the seats out can help, but it's not essential.

Remove the hoses for the air vents from the back, unscrew the tach and speedo cables, remove the wire groups for the gauge binnacle, remove and mark the wires for the small gauges. Remove and mark and cables (hand throttle). Remove radio. Remove hoses to defrost vents, pull defrost grilles up and out. The gauge pinnacle pops out by prying through two small slots underneath, which you can see by looking up from the bottom. Use a thin screwdriver or small putty knife to push up on the releasing springs in there. With the binnacle out access is better.

Remove A-pillar trim. Remove steering column clamshell, maybe loosen steering column 17mm nuts. Remove screws visible through defroster vents, then a 10mm nut on a stud at each outer end below the A pillar. There are one or two steel support brackets, attached to studs near/below the radio opening and maybe one to the left of the steering column. The whole thing should then lift out, exposing the heater.

This understates somewhat the need to lie on your back, see into dark places, reach where it's hard to. But basically proceed slowly, noting and marking each thing you undo so it goes back the right way later. To remove the dash, be sitting in the driver's seat, and after the screws are out, pull it into your lap, moving slowly so you can catch anything you might have missed undoing, and not just ripping connections loose. Or have one person on each end, leaning in each door.

It can also help access to remove the steering wheel, again not essential. I haven't done this in some time, so I may have forgotten a step, but this is basically it.

Andrew
 

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yes thank you , im tackling this next
Peter
 

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Alfa dashes of this period are all pretty similar in terms of removal. Unhook the battery first. Be prepared to take pics and/or make notes and mark wires and cables.

(...)
This is what I was planning for long cold weekends in Jan or Feb - thanks for that wonderful explanation; otherwise I surely would have asked the same question as the thread opener.
Joerg
 

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So I pulled mine today out of the 73 Berlina. Windshield still out so no need to mess w steering wheel. Removing Center vents exposed those bolts, dropping the fuse panel on left made it easier to get the left nut off. Right side was easy to get too. All are 10mm n better accesssd with an extension in the socket. Took a few hours but most was spent labeling wires n taking pics, to hopefully help in putting it all back together. Now to find a good guy to redo it. Plenty to do while that’s going on. Cheers
 

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Save some time and trouble, leave the steering wheel in there. As Andrew said, mark the wires as you remove them. It will save gobs of time.
 

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Sorry, are you sure it's impossible to regenerate your dashboard?
Humbly, I say it because 99,9% you buy not a new brand but a well regenrated one.
 

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That is my plan is to restore what I have. Hoping to do it professionally if possible. If I find a good thread on DIY, I may get inspired to do it myself.
 
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Dash is off to upholstery shop. Plastic welding was almost fun. Fumes make it a 1-2 hr gig st a time.
 

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Interesting....I'd love to see pics of the result. Are they doing time all in one piece?
My kit came from Polyvance a couple days ago. When my shop warms up in a week or so, I'll get started.
 

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I don’t think mine can be done in one piece. Sure it will have a seam around binnacle. FWIW I bought a jack if extra sticks n used all of them. If I had to do it again, I’d be less aggressive with Dremel in making grooves to open up cracks. Especially around curves n corners. It melds well with the foam so I’d avoid cutting they it all the way even if cracks goes to bottom. The plastic will fill it. All this will make refinishing it easier.

Btw, just dashes has a video of their process n they they sand all the vinyl away n a chunk of foam then glue over foam n sand it down to shape. Sure that’s the time sucking part.

It’s cool but I’m tapping out on my car n will be happy with it redone n installed again. Been 6 months and $$$ n I’m ready to drive it
 

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I don’t think mine can be done in one piece. Sure it will have a seam around binnacle. FWIW I bought a pack of extra sticks n used all of them. If I had to do it again, I’d be less aggressive with the Dremel in making grooves to open up cracks. Especially around curves n corners. It melds well with the foam so I’d avoid cutting thru it all the way even if cracks goes to bottom. The plastic will fill it. All this will make refinishing it easier.

Btw, just dashes has a video of their process n they they sand all the vinyl away n a chunk of foam then glue over foam n sand it down to shape. Sure that’s the time sucking part.

It’s cool but I’m tapping out on my car n will be happy with it redone n installed again. Been 6 months and $$$ n I’m ready to drive it
 

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Thanks for the Dremel tips. My investment(?) in this is also adding up, quickly, mostly in engine parts. I also have some parts coming from Larry. I'm pretty far behind you and slower. I was hoping to have it ready this summer, but not looking good for that.
Looking forward to seeing the dash covered.
 
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