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Discussion Starter #1
All,

i did some searching but couldn't find any advice on these subjects. can anyone lend some wisdom?

1 - installing u-joints - what's the best way to proceed? i've gotten one of them in, but something must installed wrong because only 1 of the c-clips can be installed (seems like the u-joint is too wide!)...maybe i got the wrong one, but i don't think so.

2 - how do i get the support bearing off of the driveshaft? is it simply a matter of using a puller?

Kevin
 

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1- I would check the installation of the U-joints first, but I did read on other threads about having to have the right circlip thickness.

2- The bearing has to be pressed off, as the force required is quite large. Leave the nut on the end of the shaft to prevent the assembly from flying all over the place when the bearing presses off.
 

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I've been able to do pretty much everthing on my car myself with a limited workshop. Replacing the universal joint has been the one exception that beat me even though I read all the DIY "bench vice" threads on the BB first. I ended up taking it to a drive shaft specialist to finish the job off which they did superbly and balanced both halves while they were at it. I have recovered fully from the defeat and moved on.
Don't for get to get the universals in sync when you reassemble.:)
 

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I've had the problem of getting replacement u-joints that are not the correct size. Check the size of old ones against the new ones.
 

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The support bearing can be pulled off easily with any old cheap puller, but the yoke is an absolute bastard to get off the tapered end. After destroying a couple of cheap pullers I gave up and handed it over to the local garage. They eventually got it off ... with a 20-ton press!

After that, it's just a matter of removing the bearing housing/rubber thing which attached to the chassis. I used a hacksaw. Be careful with the slinger behind the housing.



 

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Discussion Starter #7
so the classic alfa u-joint i have, which is the shorter version..is the one that doesn't fit!

the one i got from spruill is a bit longer...and also doesnt fit.

not really sure where to go from here. are both u joints the same? i presume so...but maybe that's causing some problems for me?
 

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Kevin I am sure you checked, but any chance you wedged a roller under the cap? Only reason I asked because I just did it. U joints from Centerline fit fine after the oops was corrected. No grease zerks though....
Brian
 

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I've had the problem of getting replacement u-joints that are not the correct size. Check the size of old ones against the new ones.
Also check the thickness of the new circlips against the old circlips. And, make sure there aren't burrs / shear flashing on the edges of the new circlips. Oh, and while you're at it, make sure the grooves that the circlips fit into didn't get mashed closed while the old U joints were getting hammered out.

MRTR2 said:
any chance you wedged a roller under the cap?
Yup, I've done that too. When that's your problem, the circlip will miss fitting into the groove by a mile. So kpc655: How much room is there for the circlip to go in? I know it won't fit, but is the whole groove covered by the U joint cup, or is most of the groove visible? If the first, then MRTR2 may have suggested the problem. If the second, then you may have incorrect parts, or else one of the problems I described above.
 

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It is also possible to bend a yoke slightly when hammering or pressing joints in /out. If bent slightly closed then the joint would appear too long, although I wonder if a bent yolk would be misaligned slightly as well and therefore not be able to lined up for the re-installation of cups.

FWIW

Ken
 

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just did this job yesterday. if you can get one circlip on, put the yoke in a vice with a socket on the other cap. press the other cap in with the vice and put the clip on. You should have slop in the u-joint if the cap is not pushed in. don't force it if you think a bearing is out, just pull the cap off and check the alignment of the bearings. I could slip the caps on and off, but they got tight as they were pushed in, and would only seat with the extra compression from the vice. the u-joints I got from Centerline had the grease fittings. the CL catalog shows the same u-joint for all '65-'74, different item # for earlier cars.
Stan
 

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I think everyone at one time or another when we were younger had a needle bearing fall down. If one has the ujoint will be in a bind when you have the second cap almost to the point where the second clip will go in.
There are lots of u-joints out there that claim to fit an Alfa but they don't. Had the best luck with Centerline and IAP.
 

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Hi all,
I've twice been able to use a puller to remove the flange off the taper - no puller breakage in my case. You should always get decent puller tools, IMO (no disparaging comments intended toward TorW) - you put a puller under one hell of a lot of strain, and your body is not far away when you're using it. You don't want pullers exploding - never. And for sure always keep nuts in place where applicable, pretty close to their normal position. 1mm gap is plenty. Where applicable, always hold the piece you're working on in a vice so you're not fighting against yourself when trying to tighten the puller.
Also, be gentle in the sense of cranking up the pulling force only incrementally, not trying to go John Rambo on it. What I always try to do is to give the puller some time to work. A joint may move after the puller's been providing the force for a minute rather than right away. Also - the torch is your friend ! (Repeat after me: "the torch is my friend") A good way is to get the puller up to a pretty decent force level, get out your propane torch, light it up full blast (no diddling around with a puny flame, get it going hard), and put intense heat into what you're trying to pull off, the cylinder of the flange in this case. You'll very often find the joint will pop apart after several minutes of heat. If it doesn't work, then give the assembly time to cool down to room temp again, then increase puller force, and try the torch again.
You have to let things cool down fully as you need the biggest temperature difference between the two sides of the joint. If you don't let things cool down, then the inside piece will still be hot and the torch doesn't help you much.
Apologies if I'm being pedantic...

About procedure for changing u-joints, here's a copy/paste of tips that Tom Sahines gave me some years ago before the first time I did this. Full credit to Tom for the description. I've had good success following this:

""
A couple tips for installing the new joint.

Be sure that the cup can pass all the way through each hole. I use the old caps and press them through each hole. File locally where needed to prevent binding.

For loose holes use a punch on the inside of the hole to raise the surface in a lot of places. Then push a cap through – keep doing this until you get the fit you want.

The trick to installing the new joint – first take off the caps and l lube them with a very stiff grease to help keep the rollers in – next install the cross then push it all the way over to one side and put the cap on now push that cap all the way in until it stops because the cross hits the other side. Install a snap ring on the first side. Now put the other cap on and push it back until you hit the snap ring. If you can install the other snap ring you are done. If not then you need to remove the snap rings and make them thinner until they both will go in. If you drop a roller the second cup will not go in enough to see the snap ring groove and then you have to take it all apart and start over. Not easy but you can do it. It is always a good idea to buy three joints in case you have problems. If you do drop a roller be sure it is not bent when trying to reuse it.

I made a little holder on my lathe that retains the snap ring and then I hold it against the side of my grinding wheel to thin it up. They usually need a lot of material removed. I don’t know why they supply such thick snap rings. Measure and duplicate you old ones or just use your old ones if they are thinner.

After you get the whole assembly together you need to make sure that each cup is pressed up against the snap ring. Do this by supporting the joint in a vise as shown on the attached sketch and then hit the opposite end to seat the cup. When done the joint MUST move freely or you will end up with a vibration.

Most important – MARK EVERYTHING SO YOU GET IT BACK TOGETHER THE SAME WAY.
""

In my case I did have to do a lot of sanding the snap-rings down to fit. I just used emery cloth and pushed the snapring down with a couple fingers, then did figure-8's. Measure the snap rings in several places around the circumference (with a micrometer) to see if they are thicker in a particular place. Sometimes they can be a bit twisted also, and that works out the same as if they are too thick. Twisted areas need to get reduced also. Using the fingers and the emery paper, you'll be ready to perform espionnage duties as you won't have too much of your fingerprints left, but hey :cool:

Cheers
Neil
 

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Why are these drivesafts so complex? My wife's 66 Galaxie has a one piece shaft that is close to twice as long and it gets by without a center support and a Gubio? There must be a good reson but I've never seen it.
 

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The rear part of the driveshaft is the same length as the trailing arms, which minimises movement in the splines, and reduces vibration. I'm willing to bet that the Galaxie's rear axle wasn't located in the same way that the GTV's is.
 

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The rear part of the driveshaft is the same length as the trailing arms, which minimises movement in the splines, and reduces vibration.
Actually, though they may be roughly the same length, the front u-joint of the driveshaft is located about 14 inches ahead of, and slightly above, the front trailing arm mount. If Alfa was trying to minimize movement in the splines, the pivot points would have much closer together.

Why are these driveshafts so complex?
The giubo (rubber donut) was designed to be a buffer between the driveline and the transmission and are designed to flex, but only slightly. The amount of flex necessary to follow the rear axle would be too much so another pivot point was necessary further down the driveshaft. The center bearing support is used to keep the driveshaft in line with the transmission output shaft until it reaches the first u-joint.
 

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question while we're on driveshafts

Since we're talking driveshafts, sometimes mine bangs against the hand-brake lever link inside the tunnel when I hit a nasty bump in the road. It's a very unpleasant noise. Many moons ago, after figuring out where this awful noise was coming from, I shimmed the driveshaft downwards at the carrier bearing by adding washers between the carrier bearing mounting flanges and the mounting studs which are welded inside the trans tunnel. This wasn't pretty or correct but it worked to the extent that the I rarely get the nasty bang with this configuration. This past summer I removed my shim/washers and took a test drive and the noise returned (so I put them back). My driveshaft was rebuilt right after I got the car in the mid 90's including a new carrier, maybe 20K miles ago. Any thoughts as to what's buggered up?
 

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Hi,
Most probably your motor mounts and gearbox mount bush are collapsed from age, or not the right mounts/bush for the car. I don't see much else that would cause that much movement.
/Neil
 
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